Obesity Puts People at Risk for These 11 Cancers

Healthy people come in all shapes and sizes. Just because someone is thin doesn’t mean they have healthy insides and just because someone is fat doesn’t mean they are unhealthy. Yet, research continues to shed a light on the connections between those who fall into the “obese” category and major health conditions. Recently, a new study has shown the strong link between obesity and risk for 11 different types of cancer.

Cancer, the leading cause of death worldwide, is a disease that shouldn’t be taken lightly. A study published in The BMJ evaluated 204 previous studies on the connection between obesity indicators and 36 cancers. Hormone-related tumors, especially in women, and cancers of the digestive system were found to have the biggest link to obesity. Other conditions which showed undeniable links, were cancers of the breast, ovaries, colon, rectum, esophagus, kidney, biliary tract system, pancreas, gall bladders and bone marrow.

The World Health Organization estimates that 1.9 billion adults are overweight and about 600 million adults are obese. Incidence rates have doubled since the year 1980. This means research on the condition’s connection to disease is relatively new, in the grand scheme of things. Scientists are quickly developing a picture of the health risks that are associated with obesity, however, which include these cancers.

“Avoiding weight gain through adult years is important,” Dr. Graham Colditz, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, told The Huffington Post. “Even if you are overweight, focus first on not gaining any more weight; for those who are overweight or obese, taking off some pounds can lower cancer risk.”

When trying to address the growing research between obesity and its risks for heart disease, cancers and diabetes, there is a difficult line to walk. Some people may be quick to slip into an admonishing tone without taking into consideration the whole person to whom they are talking.

Blame and shame can too easily be shifted without recognition of the countless reasons WHY obesity rates have been rising. A culture that latches onto fat-shaming trends and wags its finger at people who are fat is a culture that ignores individuals’ emotional wellbeing and sense of self.

While obesity is one indicator of health, it is not the sole indicator. The goal is to find ways to balance the act of learning what medical research says with the act of keeping a healthy body image. Each of these are evolving lifelong processes, yet both vitally important.

Related:
5 Science-Backed Effects of Fat Shaming You Should Be Aware Of
Obesity is a Growing Problem, But So is Malnutrition
Chronic Stress is Linked to Higher Obesity Risk

Photo credit: Thinkstock

39 comments

Marie W
Marie W5 months ago

Thanks again

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Sarah Hill
Sarah Hill6 months ago

thanks

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Peggy B
Peggy B8 months ago

Thinking about all the people I have lost to cancer only one was fat. The rest were average weight of always none thin. For years I have read that being fat increases cancer, but is there really good research on it?

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heather g
heather g9 months ago

It's easier to love veggies...

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Always will

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Love veggies.

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Thanks

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Always have.

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barry Werbowsky
barry Werbowsky9 months ago

If people would get up off their ASS AND MOVE!!!!! Thx

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Margie F
Margie F9 months ago

Thank you

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