Orange Is The New Dog Treat: Fall Veggies for Canines

5. Sweet potatoes are another source of dietary fibre and contain vitamin B6, vitamin C, beta carotene, and manganese. Sweet potatoes are great sliced and dehydrated as a chewy treat for your dog. There are so many dog treats on the market that we often overlook the simple, healthy, and reasonably priced treats available at our grocery store. – See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/10-people-foods-dogs/1896#sthash.AsXENQxS.dpuf
5. Sweet potatoes are another source of dietary fibre and contain vitamin B6, vitamin C, beta carotene, and manganese. Sweet potatoes are great sliced and dehydrated as a chewy treat for your dog. There are so many dog treats on the market that we often overlook the simple, healthy, and reasonably priced treats available at our grocery store. – See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/10-people-foods-dogs/1896#sthash.AsXENQxS.dpuf

It’s the height of fall and gorgeous orange pumpkin patches abound. Your dogs may not be allowed to run around the pumpkin patches, but you probably want to consider ways that you can start feeding your dog pumpkin. And that is not the only orange vegetable they’ll find health benefits in. Sweet potatoes, carrots and squash also rock the canine health world.

Sweet Potatoes are often an added top ingredient to higher grade dog kibble. The addition of vitamin B6, vitamin C and beta carotene all benefit dogs. I often steam sweet potatoes and give them to Sanchez and Gina as high value treats during training. Slow cooking or dehydrating slices of sweet potatoes is also a good way to give them chewy treats that keep them occupied and happy when they are left alone. Just slice a sweet potato into thick slices. Bake at 175 degrees (or the lowest setting on your oven) for eight hours. However, if your pup is overweight, the starch in sweet potatoes may help him put on the extra pounds, so minimize your portions.

Carrots are a fabulous alternative for dog biscuits. While it’s not a substitute for teeth cleaning, carrots can help prevent tartar build up. Carrots are loaded with healthy vitamins, including B, C, D, E and K. They can even help improve your dog’s eyesight. While they can be fed either cooked or raw, if you feed them raw, make sure you cut them into small pieces to help provide easier digestion. While not all dogs like raw carrots, Sanchez and Gina love them, so I cut up small carrot pieces that I combine with other training treats for their nighttime training. Another option is to shred them and sprinkle them on their dog food.

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Pumpkins provide a great source of fiber that aids in digestive health. Pureed pumpkin (with no added sugar or spice) can help dogs and cats with both constipation and diarrhea. Pumpkin seeds are high in essential fatty acids and antioxidants that are good for overall healthy skin and fur. Additionally, the oils in pumpkin seeds are believed to support urinary health. They are also an excellent source of vitamin A, beta-carotene, potassium and iron. Click for dog treat recipes with pumpkin.

Gina Squash

Squash is another orange veggie that packs in the vitamins—specifically calcium and vitamin A. According to HubPages, those added vitamins help support canine kidney health. And squash contains potassium that can help reduce heart failure in dogs.

Not all fruits and veggies are good for dogs. Please avoid grapes, raisins, garlic, onions, tomatoes and mushrooms.

Do you feed your dogs any veggies plentiful during autumn? Any others you recommend? Thanks for sharing your experiences in a comment below.

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5. Sweet potatoes are another source of dietary fibre and contain vitamin B6, vitamin C, beta carotene, and manganese. Sweet potatoes are great sliced and dehydrated as a chewy treat for your dog. There are so many dog treats on the market that we often overlook the simple, healthy, and reasonably priced treats available at our grocery store. – See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/10-people-foods-dogs/1896#sthash.AsXENQxS.dpuf

66 comments

Justyna L.
Justyna L6 months ago

Tyfs

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Valentina R.
Valentina R6 months ago

They're good but in moderation unless you want a dog with diarrhea.

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Kay M.
Kay M6 months ago

Good evening and thank you for this article - great to know that these veggies are O.K. to give to my beautiful mini dachshund - sincerely KAY M.

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MARLA H.
MARLA H6 months ago

There are NUMEROUS veterinary sites which state that TOMATOES are safe for dogs. I have feed tomatoes, in moderation, to all my dogs for decades with no ill effect.

Because of the fact that tomatoes are in the nightshade family of plants, the leaves and stems and other green parts of the plant are poisonous to varying degree, as are unripe/green tomatoes. Ripe tomatoes, in moderation, are a perfectly safe and reasonable treat or addition to meal, as they are highly nutritious. Large quantity should be avoided, as even the ripe fruit does contain trace amount of the toxins.

Never, however, allow your pets into the tomato garden unattended, nor ever give them unripened tomatoes to eat.

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Marija Mohoric
Marija M6 months ago

tks

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Marie Squire
Marie Squire6 months ago

thank-you,for the post

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Renata Kovacs
Renata Kovacs6 months ago

I did not know that Thank you to share...

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Ruth S.
Ruth S6 months ago

Thanks.

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William C.
William C6 months ago

Thank you.

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Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Cabout a year ago

Thank you for sharing.

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