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Prevent Breast Cancer by Any Greens Necessary

Recently a study of 50,000 African-American women was published, a sadly neglected demographic when it comes to nutritional science and, in fact, medical research generally. Certain African populations were among the healthiest on earth, inspiring one of America’s lifestyle medicine pioneers Nathan Pritikin (see my 2-min. video Engineering a Cure). Sadly, African-Americans currently suffer disproportionately from chronic diseases. The good news is that many of the diseases—such as high blood pressure and diabetes—can be prevented, stopped, and even reversed with a healthy plant-based diet.

The Black Women’s Health Study investigated fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer. Those who listened to mom and ate their veggies had a significantly lower risk of the most difficult type of breast cancer to treat (estrogen-receptor negative). Were any plants found particularly protective?

Which was associated with lowest breast cancer risk in African-American women? Apples, bananas, broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupe, carrots, collard greens, grapefruit, oranges, spinach, tomatoes, or sweet potatoes? Click on the 3-min. NutritionFacts.org video pick above to find out the answer.

For more on breast cancer prevention and diet, see my Care2 posts from last week Mushrooms For Breast Cancer Prevention and Why Less Breast Cancer in Asia?

More on broccoli and breast cancer:

More on carrots in:

More on collards in:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and watch 2012 year-in-review presentation Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death.

Image credit: smith_cl9 / Flickr

Related:
What Should Women Eat to Live Longest?
Breast Cancer Survival and Soy
Are Bioidentical Hormones Safe?

Read more: Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, Food, General Health, Health, Videos, Women's Health, , ,

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Dr. Michael Greger

A founding member of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. Currently Dr. Greger serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at The Humane Society of the United States. Hundreds of his nutrition videos are freely available at NutritionFacts.org.

40 comments

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1:09PM PDT on Jun 21, 2013

Thanks

6:16AM PST on Feb 9, 2013

Let's go green for what we eat

5:09PM PST on Feb 2, 2013

noted

3:52PM PST on Feb 2, 2013

Thank you, good information.

9:21PM PST on Feb 1, 2013

I love my veggies and always have carrots. For the first time, last year I planted collard greens and found, unlike most plants/veggies, they are perfectly suited to the BC climate.
Wish I could enjoy them all year round...

10:54AM PST on Feb 1, 2013

Thank you!

10:13AM PST on Feb 1, 2013

Thank you - excellent info :-)

9:54AM PST on Feb 1, 2013

Thanks

8:03AM PST on Feb 1, 2013

Good to know, but always make sure you clean these vegetables well because you can get sick. What I like about a lot of greens is you can eat many of them cooked or non-cooked so that means there is always a way to get them into the daily diet.

6:11AM PST on Feb 1, 2013

Thx , very interesting for me:))

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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