START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

Rustic Apricot and Almond Tart

Rustic Apricot and Almond Tart

It seems like only yesterday there was little more than apples and cabbage at the greenmarket, and now we’ve have five days straight of brow-beating heat in the northeast. Which means one thing to me: Expect apricots soon.

They will first appear timidly, testing their toes, and then “bang!” they will be absolutely overflowing from the greenmarket tables. In anticipation of this, I have been thinking about all things apricot–and I thought I’d start off with a rustic apricot tart. I like the classic nature of a tart baked in a tart pan, but find that a rustic tart baked flat on a sheet pan can be exceptionally charming. This one is pretty simple since it relies on a puff pastry shortcut, and super delicious with the addition of a simple homemade almond paste.

INGREDIENTS
1/3 cup Sucanat (or your preferred natural sweetener)
2/3 cup slivered almonds, lightly toasted
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons applesauce
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
1 1/2 tablespoons flour
1 sheet frozen puff pastry, room temperature
6 fresh apricots, halved and pits removed
1/4 cup whole almonds

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

2. Put the almonds and Sucanat in a food processor and process until coarse. Add the butter and applesauce, process until incorporated, then add the egg, vanilla, and the flour and mix until smooth.

3. On a floured surface, roll out puff pastry and transfer to a parchment-lined baking pan. Trim away the edges of the pastry to leave a large circle, about nine inches in diameter. Spread the almond paste in the middle of the pastry leaving a one-inch edge. Stick the apricot halves into the paste, cut side up, in circles around the tart, and fill in the spaces with the whole almonds

4. Bake until the pastry has puffed and the top is lightly browned, about 30 to 40 minutes.

Read more: All recipes, Desserts, Food, , ,

By Melissa Breyer, Senior Editor, Care2 Green Living

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Melissa Breyer

Melissa Breyer is a writer and editor with a background in sustainable living, specializing in food, science and design. She is the co-author of True Food (National Geographic) and has edited and written for regional and international books and periodicals, including The New York Times Magazine. Melissa lives in Brooklyn, NY.

14 comments

+ add your own
9:00PM PDT on Mar 10, 2013

Looks delightful, especially in the winter!

10:47PM PST on Nov 11, 2012

Making this one, for sure !! Thanks.

6:28PM PST on Nov 10, 2012

yum

8:16AM PDT on Oct 28, 2011

WOW....fabulous recipe, thanks so much..

1:10AM PDT on Aug 25, 2011

Amazing! Fabulous recipe. Thanks.

1:10AM PDT on Aug 25, 2011

Amazing! Fabulous recipe. Thanks.

1:55PM PST on Jan 25, 2011

Thanks. Sounds good.

11:11AM PDT on Mar 14, 2010

Thanks, this sound awesome :)

10:22AM PDT on Mar 14, 2010

Thank you!

5:45AM PDT on Mar 14, 2010

This sounds delicious. Can you use sugar instead of an alternative sweetener?

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

All species find those things highly annoying.

You left out cannabis flowers - ummm love them.

Some good ideas if I ever need them!

Certainly this is a rather interesting concept, certainly very different to what we have become used…

Leftover coffee? LOL - but some great ideas thanks!

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.