What’s Your Serving Size IQ? (Quiz)

 

Studies have shown time and again that controlling and understanding serving sizes is a crucial factor in your overall diet. Unfortunately, though, figuring out how much of something you’re supposed to eat isn’t as easy as it seems. Though most foods have nutrition labels on the package, they can be very misleading. So, what’s a healthy eater to do? Well, take it into your own hands, of course. Read on to test your knowledge of serving sizes — and let us know how you did in the comments section!

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1. Sometimes, Nutrition Facts labels can be misleading because:

a. The serving size can be counterintuitive — 1/2 a muffin or 1/2 a can of soup.
b. Serving sizes are often much lower than what people actually eat.
c. It’s hard to visualize what exactly 1/2 cup or 2 ounces is without measuring it.
d. All of the above.

See next page for answer!

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Answer: d. All of the above.

2. Screaming for ice cream? The recommended portion size is:

a. 1/4 cup, or the size of a golf ball.
b. 1/2 cup, or the size of a tennis ball.
c. 3/4 cup, or the size of a two hockey pucks.
d. 1 cup, or the size of a baseball.

See next page for answer!

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Answer: b. 1/2 cup, or the size of a tennis ball

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3. On nutrition labels, serving sizes are based on,

a. The recommended portion to maintain a healthy diet.
b. Whatever the manufacturer decides.
c. The average amount of the product that people consume.
d. all of the above.

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Answer: c. The average amount of the product that people consume.

Explanation: In the 1970s and 1980s, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) surveyed Americans’ eating habits. The standardized serving sizes on food packaging is based on these surveys.

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4. Pasta night? The FDA recommends a serving size of:

a. 1/4 cup, about the size of a large egg.
b. 1 ounce, about the size of a casette tape.
c. 2 ounces, about the size of your fist.
d. 3 ounces, about the size of your checkbook.

See next page for answer!

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Answer: c. 2 ounces, about the size of your fist.

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5. True or False: Most people overestimate or underestimate how much food they’ve eaten.

a. True
b. False

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Answer: a. True

Explanation: Across race, class, age, nationality, weight and gender, pretty much everyone either greatly overestimates or underestimates their food intake. Often, that means underestimating fats, oils, sweets, dairy and meat products, and overestimating fruits and veggies.

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6. Time for tofu? You should be eating a serving of:

a. 1/4 cup, about the size of a large egg.
b. 1 ounce, about the size of your thumb.
c. 2 ounces, about the size of a bar of soap.
d. 3 ounces, about the size of  the palm of your hands.

See next page for answer!

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Answer: d. 3 ounces, about the size of  the palm of your hands.

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7. Average portion sizes have exploded in the past few decades. Restaurant meals today, for instance, are ___ times larger than they were just 50 years ago.

a. Two.
b. Three.
c. Four.
d. Five.

See next page for answer!

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Answer: c. Four.

Explanation: Yep, four times larger. The vast majority (a whopping 96 percent) of restaurant meals also exceed recommended intake of fat, sodium and saturated fat.

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39 comments

katarzyna phillips

a lot of this shoiws the variation beween uk and american laws. food stated is how much calories an adult needs, so 2000 for women and 2500 for men. serving sizes are in grams so there is no way you can overfill the cup-it's recommended 75g of pasta per person. so with your strange ways of quantifying, i got 3 right, although i'd question how you can quantify things that don't fill a 'cup' like pasta quills to get the right amount

Stella Gamboni
Stella Gamboni3 years ago

Without going through all nine pages of this article, I can still say a couple of things:

First, if you're into packaged, prepared foods, never believe the serving size listed on the package. A package is ALWAYS one serving, no matter what. Pizza, Doritos, ice cream, little chocolate donuts, Lean Cuisine. It doesn't matter. One package, one serving.

Second, if you don't know by now how much you can eat without gaining weight, an article is not going to change anything.

Third, eat your vegetables.

Elisabeth T.
Elisabeth T4 years ago

Thank you for this info..

Penny B.
.4 years ago

Good info, thanks.

Fred Krohn
Fred Krohn4 years ago

I have routinely noted that the FDA 'serving sizes' have absolutely no connection with real portion sizing when I eat; I tend to ignore the 'nutrition farts' labelling as irrelevant and maintain my fitness by balancing portion sizing and bicycle riding and walking exercises and do quite well for 56 years old. I'd be in favour of trimming back or abandoning the FDA and most other bureaucracy.

rene davis
irene davis4 years ago

Thanks!

Sheila L.
Sheila Swan L4 years ago

One thing that is really flawed on this last question is restaurant portion sizes. It depends on what restaurant you are patronizing and in what part of the country. Denny's and Mac Donalds is one long way from a really nice place and some of the pricier ones even have pretty small portions.

Barb Hansen
Ba H4 years ago

great info

Kirsten B.
Past Member 4 years ago

I based my answers on European (continental) habits so got a few wrong - like the size of a restaurant meal or the size of a portion of ice cream. A few others were much more than I thought (serving of tofu, for example).
Thanks for making us think about it.

Nils Lunde
PlsNoMessage se4 years ago

TY