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The Bitter Herb: How To Prepare Fresh Horseradish for Passover

The Bitter Herb: How To Prepare Fresh Horseradish for Passover

Passover starts this coming Monday at sundown. Which means that it’s high time to think about the seder plate. Although you can also use dandelion greens, endive, or romaine lettuce, horseradish is probably the most popular choice for the bitter herbs on the Passover seder plate.

I’d heard that horseradish sauce is pretty easy to make so I was not surprised by the scores of simple recipes that came up when I googled “make your own horseradish.” But I was surprised by the sheer number of strongly-worded WARNINGS in all the recipes! It seems that horseradish’s characteristic bite is sharpest when the oils in the root are first exposed to air. These oils are apparently so potent that all the recipes I read insisted on the following precautions:

a) preparing the root outdoors,
b) wearing gloves and protective eye wear, and
c) doing anything and everything you can to avoid touching your eyes after handling the stuff.

This actually sounded kinda fun to me so I soldiered on. Horseradish root is available all year and I found a big, fresh-looking root without any blemishes or mold on it at our local supermarket.

On a sunny afternoon, I gathered everything I would need – gloves, sunglasses, apron, Cuisinart, extension cord (for plugging the Cuisinart in outside), compost bucket (for the horseradish root peels), spatula, vegetable peeler, knife, rubber spatula, measuring spoon, measuring cup, white vinegar, salt, ice cold water, the washed horseradish root, and two glass jars for storing the final product – and headed for our back deck. Here is a photo of my little set up.

My set up for making fresh horseradish sauce
I began by donning my gloves and sunglasses and peeling the horseradish root down to its creamy white interior and removing any blemishes. The next step was to cut the peeled root into cubes to make it more manageable for the Cuisinart’s blades to chop.
Cutting up the horseradish root
I was now ready to begin the grinding. Before I dumped the cubed root into the bowl of the Cuisinart, I poured a little bit of the ice water into the bottom. Then I added the root, snapped the top into place and hit the “on” button.
Cubes of horseradish in the cuisinart
I was immediately rewarded with a big splash of grated horseradish in the face (via that little tube in the top of the Cuisinart) and was very thankful for my sunglasses. Waves of hot horseradish scent radiated from the spinning blades making me glad I had chosen to do this out of doors (thank you again, Internet warnings.) After 20-30 seconds, the cubes of hard root had become a smooth white sauce. I opened the top to push down any stray chunks that had escaped the blades with the rubber spatula and blended another 10 seconds or so to ensure an even consistency.
Fresh horseradish sauce
Now it was time to add the vinegar and salt. Vinegar has a neutralizing effect on the oils that give horseradish its heat. Consequently, adding vinegar earlier in the process will prevent the horseradish from reaching its peak heat. Or, if you want your horseradish to be as hot as possible, wait three minutes after you’ve finished the blending and then add the vinegar. Since I was shooting for only medium intensity in this batch of horseradish, I added the white vinegar and salt right away. Then I blended the mixture for another 5 or so seconds to combine evenly.

At this point, the only thing left to do was taste it and make sure it was fit for human consumption. I reached in and scooped out a dollop on a spoon (I found myself blowing on the spoon before I put it in my mouth in an unconscious attempt to “cool” it down) and was rewarded with a mouthful of pungent flavor – fresh, spicy, and just a tiny bit sweet. It was damn good horseradish!!!

My two jars of fresh horseradish

I decided to spoon it into the two jars outside, in the hopes of confining most of the mess I was creating to our deck. The piece of root I’d bought had made two full jars of horseradish. I gave them a wipe down inside, then placed them in the fridge. Ironically, horseradish must be kept cold in order to preserve its heat. It will keep well in the fridge for about 4-6 weeks or in the freezer for 6 months or more. If you want to give it a try, the recipe is below. Happy Pesach to all!

Fresh Horseradish Sauce

Ingredients*

* Fresh horseradish root (look for a firm, unblemished root – the whiter it looks inside, the fresher it is)
* White vinegar
* Salt
* Ice water

Directions

1. Gather all your protective gear, cooking implements and ingredients together and bring them all to the outdoor location of your choice (you’ll need an outlet and a table.) It’s best to have everything in place before you get started so you don’t have to run back and forth and take the gloves on and off, etc.

2. Cut the ends off the horseradish root and peel it (the interior should be a creamy white) and then cut it into cubes that will be a manageable size for your blender or Cuisinart.

3. Pour 1/4 cup of the ice water into your blender or Cuisinart (if you’re using a blender, it should be enough to just cover the blades) and dump the horseradish cubes in after it.

4. Blend it for 25-30 seconds or until it is the consistency of the prepared horseradish you’d buy at the store. If your blender or Cuisinart is having trouble, you can add a bit more water. Stop blending to shove any stray, unblended chunks down into the bowl and blend until they’ve been incorporated.

5. Depending on how hot you want the horseradish you can either add the vinegar and salt now or wait a few minutes to add it. Add 2-3 tablespoons of white vinegar and a half teaspoon of salt for each cup of ground horseradish root. Then blend a few seconds to combine thoroughly.

6. Taste (try a small amount as it may be very spicy!) the sauce to see if you need to adjust anything (more vinegar, more salt, etc.) If you’re satisfied, you can jar it up now. If your sauce seems too liquidy, you can drain off some of the water. Then spoon the sauce into glass jars with airtight lids and place them in the refrigerator. If you want to freeze the sauce, use a plastic container with an airtight lid. It will keep well in the fridge for about 4-6 weeks or in the freezer for 6 months or more.

* Use Kosher ingredients if you’re making this for a Passover seder. I’d also recommend trying to buy organic ingredients if you can find them.

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Eve Fox

Eve is the creator of The Garden of Eating, a blog about food--cooking it, eating it, and growing it. She has a legendary love of aprons and can often be found salivating over the fruits and veggies at one of the many farmersí markets near her home in Woodstock, NY. Want even more recipes, photos, giveaways, and food-related inspiration? "Like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow Eve on Twitter or Pinterest.

51 comments

+ add your own
3:05AM PDT on Apr 9, 2013

Thanks

1:30PM PDT on Apr 6, 2013

Lots of great info ~ thanks for sharing!

7:03AM PDT on Apr 2, 2013

Thank you Eve, for Sharing this!

10:48AM PDT on Mar 26, 2013

Thanks

7:35PM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

I love horseradish and now I have information as to how to prepare it. Thanks so much. Shared.

11:42AM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

One bonus to grating by hand is that you definitely will not suffer a big glop of the stuff in your face from peering into the Cuisinart. Learned that one the hard way. Hope you all enjoy it and happy Pesach to all, too.

8:55AM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

Thanks

8:23AM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

i love a big scoop of horseradish

4:03AM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

Interesting information . . . thanks for sharing

1:21AM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

Thank you for sharing

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