The End of Morphine & Heroin Addiction?

An international team of scientists has discovered a key mechanism that causes opioid addiction  — and there’s a drug that can selectively block that addiction response, without damaging the brain or interfering with pain relief.

According to a study by the University of Adelaide and the University of Colorado, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, the drug (+)-naloxone may be able to help drug addicts and patients with severe pain alike. It works by shutting down a specific immune system receptor, the Toll-Like receptor 4 (TLR4). Ordinarily, these receptors bind to opiates (like morphine) and then amplify the body’s addictive response to these drugs.

In a press release, the lead author of the study, Dr. Mark Hutchinson from the University of Adelaide, describes their findings:

“Our studies have shown conclusively that we can block addiction via the immune system of the brain, without targeting the brain’s wiring. Both the central nervous system and the immune system play important roles in creating addiction, but our studies have shown we only need to block the immune response in the brain to prevent cravings for opioid drugs. [...]

The drug (+)-naloxone automatically shuts down the addiction. It shuts down the need to take opioids, it cuts out behaviours associated with addiction, and the neurochemistry in the brain changes – dopamine, which is the chemical important for providing that sense of ‘reward’ from the drug, is no longer produced.”

While the drug naloxone has been used to treat emergency overdoses for years, this is the first clear evidence that (+)-naloxone (a variant of naloxone) might be able to prevent and aid opiate addiction in pain patients and drug addicts. Clinical trials of (+)-naloxone co-formulated with morphine, intended for patients with severe pain, may even begin within the next 18 months.

 

 

Related:
Children Send Letter to Addicted Parents
4 Dangerous Drugs Doctors Gave Your Grandparents
Acupuncture: A Drug-Free Option for Chronic Pain

55 comments

Barbara S.
Barbara S.about a month ago

Continued: mental disorders, and have been diagnosed by physicians better equipped to diagnose them and prescribe such drugs, it's imperative that they not stop them just because they realize they are feeling better. Most likely they are feeling better because the drug is working. They don't wean themselves off the way I did, either; they just throw the bottle out and fall back into their bi-polar or other types of mental misfirings. I'm so lucky I had the good sense to realize Prozac was doing more harm than good, and to wean myself off it sensibly.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/the-end-of-morphine-heroin-addiction.html#ixzz49AzfpTzO

Barbara S.
Barbara S.about a month ago

Continued: The TRUE first step is to get help from a "qualified" physician. I know this only in retrospect. My partner's family doctor (many years ago) who was a G.P. prescribed Prozac for me, to help me deal with a long-term relationship which included my partner's grief over the loss of his wife, and his need to procreate her animals - which went from 7 or 8 cats at the time to 25 (via new kittens born without any input from me). He and I parent cats and kittens much differently. He thinks "they're just cats..." I, having been an animal "reader" nearly all my life, know cats - just as children - need boundaries and discipline along with close monitoring for health problems. Yes, the Prozac numbed me to some of the problems, but it also changed my dry sense of humor to a raw, cutting humor that was demeaning, especially to him, because he had said if I didn't agree to take the drug, he didn't see a future for us. I took it for about 9 months. When I realized the cruelty in my humor, and also that my drive to write had been totally stifled, when our physician abruptly retired and died soon after, forcing us both to find a new physician, I weaned myself off the Prozac and never mentioned it again. We then worked out compromises on our differences about how to raise the cats, and I have never felt the need to ever want another kind of mood altering prescription. G.P.s in most cases, are NOT the right people to off-handedly prescribe these drugs! For those who truly DO have ment

Barbara S.
Barbara S.about a month ago

The TRUE first step is to get help from a "qualified" physician. I know this only in retrospect. My partner's family doctor (many years ago) who was a G.P. prescribed Prozac for me, to help me deal with a long-term relationship which included my partner's grief over the loss of his wife, and his need to procreate her animals - which went from 7 or 8 cats at the time to 25 (via new kittens born without any input from me). He and I parent cats and kittens much differently. He thinks "they're just cats..." I, having been an animal "reader" nearly all my life, know cats - just as children - need boundaries and discipline along with close monitoring for health problems. Yes, the Prozac numbed me to some of the problems, but it also changed my dry sense of humor to a raw, cutting humor that was demeaning, especially to him, because he had said if I didn't agree to take the drug, he didn't see a future for us. I took it for about 9 months. When I realized the cruelty in my humor, and also that my drive to write had been totally stifled, when our physician abruptly retired and died soon after, forcing us both to find a new physician, I weaned myself off the Prozac and never mentioned it again. We then worked out compromises on our differences about how to raise the cats, and I have never felt the need to ever want another kind of mood altering prescription. G.P.s in most cases, are NOT the right people to off-handedly prescribe these drugs! For those who truly DO have mental disorder

Barbara S.
Barbara S.about a month ago

I hope you will share such type of impressive contents again with us so that we can utilize it and get more advantage.

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Isoli P.
Isoli P.about a year ago

Thanks

Michealhussey M.
Past Member 3 years ago

This blog is very informative the stuff you provide I really enjoyed reading.
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Kathy Perez
Kathy Johnson3 years ago

awesome if true and good

Aud Nordby
Aud nordby3 years ago

Thanks

Mari Garcia
Mari Garcia3 years ago

I hope it works and helps people. It's so scary thinking about this type of addiction.

Carolanne Powell
C Powell3 years ago

Addiction is a cruel. very misunderstood affliction. If people could stop then they would. They KNOW that they are killing themselves....thats the control addiction has over both body & mind