This Social Network is for Farmers, Diners and Chefs

Despite the growth of the farm-to-table movement, those operating within it — from food producers to restaurants — often find themselves facing challenges stemming from a lack of connection.

Frequently, farmers lack access to channels that would allow them to share knowledge and best practices with each other. Chefs and restaurant owners often struggle with finding the high-quality, locally sourced ingredients they are looking for, or face antiquated systems (for example, some farms still fax price lists to restaurants). At the heart of many of these issues are challenges with communication and connection.

Recognizing this problem, a group of six Millennials banded together to do what this generation does best: use technology to simplify and connect. They created LET um EAT, an Oregon-based company that connects Seeders (food producers), Feeders (restaurants and retail locations), and Eaters (you know, people who like to eat) through its website and social network, and through in-person events in the community and on its farm. The company, which derives its name from the expression the group toasts with at its farm fresh meals after a long, hard day, is now on a mission to find out what will happen if it can successfully connect key players in “the food revolution.”

THE ORIGIN STORY

LET um EAT started when a group of people came together through happenstance: James Serlin, Cory Melanson, and Karl Holl were all chefs who left their fast-tracked careers to pursue their mutual dream of growing the food that they cooked; Leah Scafe was a former farm-to-table dinner director; Alex Holl, a recent college graduate from the East Coast; and Julia Niiro, a marketing director who left the corporate world.

The three chefs, Serlin, Melanson, and K. Holl, had relocated to Oregon together in 2013 with dreams of opening a restaurant and growing much of the food for it themselves. They purchased a farm that they found on Craigslist — a “mountain of mud” that they quickly learned had been dubbed “Murder Mountain,” a name derived from the special five part Dateline NBC series about four unsolved homicides that had happened on the property in the ’90s.

Despite the unexpected “character” of the land, the three men managed to turn it into a productive farm, and soon Alex Holl, Karl’s brother, moved there to help with operations. In early 2014 Scafe and Niiro, mutual friends of the farm’s owners, found themselves visiting Murder Mountain more and more frequently as they fell in love with the passion, dedication, and culture that had been created there.

They also witnessed — and experienced first hand — the challenges that those in the local food movement were up against and how hard the work was without a connection to a larger community. With this in mind, in May 2015 Niiro introduced an idea: “We were in Cory’s kitchen, and I just said, ‘What if we start a business? What if we could build the network that you guys need? What if we could farm, cook, and create a community of people like us? There is obviously a huge need for a tool and network based on what we have been experiencing, but it will require all of us to do this.’ Without hesitation the boys said yes, and the next call was to Leah.” The group soon convinced Scafe to join them, and in May 2015, LET um EAT was born.

HOW IT WORKS

Since that time, the group has been experimenting with business models and the best ways to bring the community together around food. They have created an online network that aggregates the Seeders, Feeders, and Eaters in the community; hosted live events through Takeover Dinners, which are meals prepared with the help of community members and hosted at local restaurants or event spaces that they “take over” for an evening; and found financing to purchase a new farm where they all live and work the land in Canby, Oregon, and have begun hosting community gatherings there.

To explain the concept of the LET um EAT social network in action, Niiro offered this example: “A chef friend of ours recently relocated to Portland to open a new restaurant. One of his first needs was figuring out where to source ingredients. He was unfamiliar with the farming community here, so we helped him connect with the farmers and producers that we have relationships with. This is a challenge that we’ve heard of from more than one chef, whether they’re moving to a new city or just going somewhere new for an event: it’s hard to find those people to source local, quality ingredients from. With the LET um EAT social network, Feeders and Eaters will be able to search for Seeders in their region, message them, and create those relationships.”

Read more at Conscious Company.

 

120 comments

Jerome S
Jerome S3 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S3 months ago

thanks

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Jim Ven
Jim V3 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Jerome S
Jerome S6 months ago

thanks

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Jim Ven
Jim V6 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Amanda G
Amanda G7 months ago

Thanks for posting

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Carl R
Carl R8 months ago

Thanks

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Carl R
Carl R8 months ago

Thanks for the info!!!

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George L
George L8 months ago

thanks for posting.

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Chun Lai T
Chun Lai T8 months ago

Thanks for the info

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