START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

What the World Eats: How Does Your Diet Compare?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While so many Americans are obese and simultaneously malnourished (from not getting the proper nutrients), some families photographed may have the opposite issue with undernourishment. The Sudanese family living at a refugee camp in Eastern Chad gets supplemental food from International Aid agencies. Even though their week of food looks meager, the Aboubakar family appears to be healthy, albeit slight in build.

In the same photo mentioned above, notice what beautiful teeth the 16 year old boy, Abdel, is showing off with his gentle smile — very few American or European kids have such great teeth and dental arches without significant dental intervention. Could this be due in part because of diet? When I lived in Uganda for a summer, I was struck by child after child that had picture perfect teeth just like this boy’s — bright white and perfectly straight.  However, I noticed that the closer a village was to a city, the worse the children’s teeth were. Many of the children in Kampala, the capitol of Uganda, actually had numerous rotten teeth, which broke my heart. I quickly found out what the culprit likely was — soda pop. The closer a community was to a town, the more spoiled teeth I saw, as they had more regular access to the sugary carbonated drinks. The farther away from a town, the more beautiful sets of pearly whites I saw, as these kids rarely, if ever, had soda. I talked to a number of Ugandan parents about the soda pop problem and they were shocked that an American product such as 7-up could wreck such havoc on their children’s health!

Looking at the array of “food” in the American family’s kitchen, I am left wondering if indeed our country’s poor diet is in part responsible for our sky high health care costs. Americans spend more than any other country on health care, but have the eighth lowest life expectancy out of 34 developed countries. Japan, on the other hand, spends about $2,900 per person per year on health care (about $5,000 less than Americans) – and yet they have the highest life expectancy among developed nations. If you take another look at all of the seafood the Japanese are eating, along with lots of vegetables, you have to wonder what role diet plays in life-long health care costs.

As you peruse these photos, what stands out to you? How do these photos make you think about your own diet? How do these photos fit or defy stereotypes about other countries? Do any of the photos really surprise you?

Whatever you see and however you see it, you cannot deny this delightful cross-cultural photo essay provides much food for thought, so bon appetite!

Click here for a delightful smorgasborg of Peter Menzel’s photos from Hungry Planet.

 

Read more: Basics, Caregiving, Cholesterol, Community, Diabetes, Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, Family, Feline Muse, Food, Fun, Health, Life, Smart Shopping, Travel, Vegetarian, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Cherise Udell

Cherise Udell is a mom, clean air advocate, anthropologist and feline aficionado with the nomadic habit of taking spontaneous sojourns to unusual destinations. Before her adventures in motherhood, she was an intrepid Amazon jungle guide equipped with a pair of sturdy wellingtons and a 24-inch machete, as well as a volunteer at a rainforest animal rescue center.

74 comments

+ add your own
12:14AM PDT on Jun 2, 2013

Thanks.

8:48AM PDT on May 25, 2013

Interesting article. Thank you for sharing.

8:34AM PDT on May 25, 2013

The thing in the picture - "bread" - is in fact oscypek, I don't know who put it there... it's made from milk.

8:10AM PDT on May 25, 2013

thanks

7:21PM PDT on May 24, 2013

Thanks for sharing

5:04AM PDT on May 24, 2013

Thank you for this interesting article.

8:47PM PDT on May 21, 2013

interesting

4:38AM PDT on May 20, 2013

Thanks

5:05PM PDT on May 19, 2013

Thanks for sharing this article. Food for thought.

1:10AM PDT on May 18, 2013

shared...

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

Interesting. Thank you.

Thanks for the interesting article

All this nonsense about outdoor activity!... How about less sugary stuff (cookies, more cookies, ch…

Good Poster; lots of information, but I disagree with drinking "raw milk"; I don't drink milk at all…

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.