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Woman Had 114 Cats

Woman Had 114 Cats

A Florida woman arrived at Miami-Dade Animal Services with twenty cats.  A staff-person asked if there were more and the woman said yes, eventually taking workers to her small home where there were over 90, making the total 114. Some of them were in such poor health they had to be euthanized. About sixty were in good enough shape to be housed in the animal facility and are eligible for adoption. Seven are juveniles and fourteen are nursing kittens. The woman was not charged with a crime, because she volunteered the first batch of twenty cats for adoption, and was the one who brought the problem to the attention of authorities. She also admitted there were far more and took authorities to the location and showed them the problem.

Animal hoarding is a peculiar behavior for a number of reasons. Perhaps the strangest aspect of the activity is the hoarder’s strong belief they are saving or rescuing all the animals, even though their health may be very poor; dead animals might be lying around the premises in full sight of the live ones. The United States Humane Society says that almost 250,000 animals are animal hoarding victims each year in America.

As is the case with the very large number of cats being taken all at once to the Miami-Dade facility, animal hoarding typically results in overwhelming animal care centers with a mass influx of animals all at once. These operations are often already burdened during difficult economic times, or at any time.

The living situation for the hoarder also is usually in need of some kind of intervention. Dementia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder can be part of the animal hoarding mix. Cognitive behavioral therapy and medication might address the problem, but the Humane Society says nearly 100 percent of animal hoarders return to the behavior. “The HSUS recommends that convicted animal hoarders be sentenced to mandatory psychological evaluation and treatment and that they be restricted to owning a small number of animals; two is a reasonable number.” (Source: Humane Society)

Image Credit: Tim Vickers

 

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149 comments

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1:47PM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

I do hope that those kitties all found homes. :( I also hope that the lady got help for her hoarding instincts.

1:22PM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

Sad, sad situation ... however we can't blame illness ..

12:43PM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

As we know this article is from 2011.Please keep us informed about the results after those animals have been rescued from that woman who couldn't help herself but trying to help the kitties mentioned. Thanks a lot fur an update.

11:44AM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

This is sad and the people are sick and need all the help they can get. When people try to help them, they see the helpers as wanting to tell them what they can or cannot do and that is very difficult for the hoarders as they cannot see beyond their own mentality. The hoarders need help and do not need people picking, yelling, screaming, telling them what to do or taking the hoarded items from their home without permission. They need a professional to help them see what they are doing and how to do it their own way and yet getting rid of that which is being hoarded.

10:47AM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

This is from 2011. We need an update on what's happened since then.

9:31AM PDT on Apr 19, 2013

MENTAL HEALTH EVALUATION MANDATORY!!!!

IT IS A REPEAT SITUATION WITH HOARDERS!!
THEY MAY NOT DO IT AGAIN RIGHT AWAY, BUT THEY
GO BACK TO THEIR BEHAVIOR AGAIN!!
THEY NEED TO BE IN SERIOUS MENTAL HOSPITALS,WITH SERIOUS
SESSIONS AND WHEN/IF THEY GET OUT THEN THEY NEED TO BE CHECKED UP ON
ALL THE TIME!!!

3:52PM PST on Feb 13, 2013

This article is 18 months old - hopefully the situation has been resolved.

7:35AM PST on Feb 13, 2013

I agree, these people do need mental health professionals to help them.

5:58PM PST on Feb 11, 2013

So sad, but glad she turned them over to the shelter

2:48PM PST on Feb 9, 2013

It is interesting how some people can ignore the human tendency towards "hoarding" & manage to enjoy life on its own terms, yet others experience the compulsion to "hoard" material or animal gains,in this lady's case, which causes feelings of stress, anxiety & depression .At what point does the "hoarding" take over from simply enjoying the finer things in life such as time spent with a loved one or the enjoyment created by the time to sit & enjoy a pretty view? These cost nothing. As a society, I believe that relentless pace is our downfall. We are charging around, gathering "stuff" & thereby rewarding ourselves for the energy we put into our lives-but in turn we are failing to take the time to actually enjoy what we have "hoarded".. We're forgetting to smell the flowers. Maybe we should use our time to hoard inner peace, pursuing contentment, calmness & feeling at peace with the world. Seeking therapy, whether conventional or alternative, may help us soothe away the daily stresses of life & bring a more relaxed frame of mind that would lessen the compulsion to "hoard" material things. Let's take the time to smell those flowers- we may be surprised at the benefit they can bring. Glad to hear this lady went for help & some of the cats were saved.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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