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8 Things You Probably Have at Home That Can Kill Your Cat


Offbeat  (tags: animals, environment, protection, pets, cats )

Cher
- 596 days ago - catster.com
I used to give my cats string as a toy and tuna as a treat. I won't any more. (Okay, maybe a little tuna.)



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Comments

Barbara D. (79)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 8:21 am
Always good to be reminded to be extra vigilant with cats. They are so naturally curious! String, yarn, tinsel, rubber bands ~ seriously dangerous as they can literally tie the intestines in knots. Emergency surgeries for intestinal blockages are commonplace in my profession and have saved many a cat's life. The lucky ones, that is!
 

Mary T. (321)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 8:32 am
noted. stop eating tuna so my cats don't get any either
 

Sonia Minwer Barakat Reque (55)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 12:32 pm
Good article,thanks for sharing
 

Past Member (0)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 12:54 pm
My cats aren't around any of these things.Will pass this on.
 

Allan Yorkowitz (448)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 2:28 pm
I just found out about aloe. These are great tips - even yarn; people have great intentions, but don't realize the possibilities.
 

Gloria H. (88)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 2:44 pm
also be careful about thread. I was just in time to see my cat almost swallow a threaded needle after he was chewing on the thread. Even the act of pulling on half swallowed thread can injure a cat (they dont spit it out..they spit out pills but not thread) because it's already down their throat. But, maybe it's better than having it wrap around their intestines.
 

Lynda H. (99)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 4:17 pm
All good tips - thank you Cher. Most of us know them well but it is very important to remind us and also to inform new kitty servants.

Yarn and string are great things to play with during supervised play, but one thing that is not at any time is the curling ribbon used in gift wrapping. You know - the ribbed synthetic ribbon you run between scissors or your fingers to make it curly? Itís great stuff for those of us with UGWS (Untidy Gift Wrapping Syndrome) since it makes any misshapen, over-taped, crumpled offering look good, but it is lethal for kittys.

Unlike string, yarn, cord, elastic and other natural things, it does not stretch, nor will it break. If it tangles around any part of their body and pulls tight, the cat cannot wriggle out of it. Even if you are supervising the play, it can wrap around them so tightly so fast that you will find it difficult to squeeze a scissors blade under it to cut - especially if the cat is writhing in distress. During times of gift giving, little pieces of this ribbon can fall unnoticed to the floor, and they are extremely attractive to playful kitties. One of my cats fished some out of the rubbish bin. Iíve had 2 close calls with this ribbon, despite being very careful.
 

Birgit W. (152)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 5:31 pm
Noted, thanks.
 

Joan McAllister (1064)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 5:36 pm
Noted & e-mailed to my family & friends who have cats. Thanks Cher
 

Ruth S. (298)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 6:21 pm
Who the Hell would give their kitty Booze.
 

Robert O. (12)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 7:09 pm
Thanks!
 

Fred Krohn (34)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 7:26 pm
I've seen what happened to a spaniel dog who inadvertently got into the ice water and spilled beer mix around a keg, poor thing was staggering through the night and sick in the morning but OK after that. Full strength can overload a pet's system as few animals are actually equipped to metabolise alcohol.
 

Connie O. (44)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 8:09 pm
good tips..thanks.
 

Dianne D. (462)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 8:41 pm
Thanks for the information. I was unaware of the aloe.
 

Bill and Katie D. (90)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 9:55 pm
Thank You for this article! We have to protect our kitties!
 

Shawna S. (44)
Wednesday May 8, 2013, 10:35 pm
Good article. Thanks.
And as for yarn etc... remember tinsel (if you use it) at Christmas. Bad stuff for kitties.
 

Lynda H. (99)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 1:01 am
Another toxin is coffee. They are very sensitive to caffeine.

One of my cats long ago found an unattended iced coffee and helped herself. Not long afterwards she was vomiting and very distressed. As she enjoyed milk and had no problems with lactose, it was the very small amount of caffeine in it.

My mother had a cat who enjoyed wine. The cat would jump on her lap and demand a taste, and Mum would dip her finger in and let her lick it - rather enthusiastically. Jeeks wanted more and more, but 3 fingerlicks was the limit. If Mum knew alcohol was dangerous for cats, she wouldn't have given it, but none of us knew then. It didn't cause her any harm - in fact, Jeeks lived to 20 in good health.
 

Loredana V. (23)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 2:07 am
Thank you very much for posting , sometimes it's too damned easy to make mistakes.
 

Fi T. (16)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 5:33 am
Beware of the hidden dangers for our furry friends
 

John Gregoire (264)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 5:45 am
What a stretch!!!
 

Winn Adams (205)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 9:47 am
Thanks!
 

DaleLovesOttawa O. (192)
Thursday May 9, 2013, 8:29 pm
Thanks Cher and great comments Lynda H about the curling type of ribbon. Never use that stuff and any strings or wide ribbon is under strict supervision. Have always had cats all my life as companions, they make life even more interesting and it is always good to remind and or inform those who have not read about these threats.
 

Carol H. (229)
Wednesday May 15, 2013, 1:17 pm
good info, knew about all but aloe. noted
 

Sara P. (63)
Monday May 20, 2013, 8:03 am
This is interesting, I know also that the valerian (or nard? I found this word with the google translator) sometimes can give to the cats strange and not good reaction, I see my cat when I when I take my pill of valerian before go to sleep, only to feel the smell of my hand and she goes out of her mind, I don't think that this is good for cats but I don't want to say something wrong.
Thanks Cher.
 
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