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Sea Levels Rising Too Fast for Thames Barrier


Environment  (tags: environment, oceans, nature, water, protection, flooding )

Cathryne
- 2302 days ago - independent.co.uk
A fear that sea levels will rise far faster than predicted this century has led to a revision of the plan to protect London from a devastating flood caused by the sort of storm surge in the North Sea that resulted in the closure of the Thames Barrier



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Comments

Peace Monger (185)
Saturday March 22, 2008, 7:58 am
This brings to mind a report about a new type of barrier that was developed shortly after last summer's flooding (in the UK) which raises with the flood water, instead of being a solid wall. Can't quite remember much more of the details, but at the time it made logical sense.
 

Judy Cross (83)
Saturday March 22, 2008, 8:53 am
The article make no mention of the fact that it is the geology of Britain that is the cause. Unfortunately, the Independent often runs this kind of incomplete scare story.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6231334.stm

"The result is a broad picture of land deformation across the Thames region as whole.

The investigation confirms geologic studies that show the Earth's crust is still responding to the loss of the heavy ice sheet which covered much of Britain more than 10,000 years ago - with southeast England, including London, slowly sinking.

"Britain as a whole was already quite well understood," explained Dr Bingley. "We knew the north was rising and the south was subsiding; but without the work we've done we'd only have had a single figure for the Thames Estuary."
 

Voron V. (0)
Sunday March 23, 2008, 7:41 am
Very intresting
 

Gaias Son Aiki (40)
Monday March 24, 2008, 1:48 am

Judy, as usual you are throwing sand in the eyes of the readers. When will you give up spreading your lies and misinformation about global warming? When Exxon stops paying you? It is getting very tiring to see how you always attach every climate change/global warming story here in Care2 with lies, fake science and misinformation.

The author of this article has already counted for the local subsiding of the land (which you would have noticed had you bothered to read the article), and even counting for this the sea level is rising nearly double of what it was just a couple of decades ago, while the subsiding of the land remain constant. Get your facts right Judy and stop spreading your lies and misinformation.

From the article:

When the Thames Barrier was being designed in the 1970s, global average sea levels were rising at about 1.8 millimetres a year and global warming was not seen as a threat, but in the past 15 years the rate has nearly doubled to about 3.1mm a year and many scientists expect it to accelerate still further.

Sea levels are rising even faster in south-east England because of local effects, such as land sinking, but officials for the Environment Agency said that the barrier is designed to cope with an 8mm-per-year rate of sea level increase yet still meet its design specifications such as coping with a one-in-a-thousand-year storm surge by 2030.
 

Gaias Son Aiki (40)
Monday March 24, 2008, 1:51 am

Judy, as usual you are throwing sand in the eyes of the readers. When will you give up spreading your lies and misinformation about global warming? When Exxon stops paying you? It is getting very tiring to see how you always attach every climate change/global warming story here in Care2 with lies, fake science and misinformation.

The author of this article has already counted for the local subsiding of the land (which you would have noticed had you bothered to read the article), and even counting for this the sea level is rising nearly double of what it was just a couple of decades ago, while the subsiding of the land remain constant. Get your facts right Judy and stop spreading your lies and misinformation.

From the article:

When the Thames Barrier was being designed in the 1970s, global average sea levels were rising at about 1.8 millimetres a year and global warming was not seen as a threat, but in the past 15 years the rate has nearly doubled to about 3.1mm a year and many scientists expect it to accelerate still further.

Sea levels are rising even faster in south-east England because of local effects, such as land sinking, but officials for the Environment Agency said that the barrier is designed to cope with an 8mm-per-year rate of sea level increase yet still meet its design specifications such as coping with a one-in-a-thousand-year storm surge by 2030.

 

Judy Cross (83)
Monday March 24, 2008, 8:59 am
No GSA, the sand in the eyes trick is all yours. London has been subject to flooding for centuries. There is NO evidence for man-made global warming and the constant string of scare stories coming from the huge, expensive public relations machine which runs on $100 MILLION a year, can not get around that fact.

REPEAT There is no evidence that the 3% of the CO2 that humans contribute to the tiny amount of CO2 already in the atmosphere..(.0.0385%...that's all there is folks.)..does anything to weather or climate. The Greenhouse Effect is 95% due to WATER VAPOR.

Climate is determined by the Sun and Sunspots and Cosmic Rays and where we are in our travels through the Galaxy. If you haven't seen it yet, do watch:
The Cloud Mystery - Klimamysteriet part 1/6

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkgEUN_TyoA&feature=related

 

Past Member (0)
Monday March 24, 2008, 9:08 am
Levee Holds at Flood-Threatened Town
River Crests but Town's New Levee Holds As Midwest Fights Spring Floods

Residents of small towns along the Meramec River breathed a sigh of relief Saturday as the stream finally crested following days of flooding caused by torrential rainfall across the Midwest.
At Valley Park, the river rose to a peak of 37.8 feet Saturday morning, well above the flood stage of 16 feet but still below the record of 39.7 feet, according to the National Weather Service.

It was the first trial of the town's $49 million levee, which stands a few feet above Saturday's crest and was designed to withstand the biggest flood that might be expected in a century.

"It's a 100-year event, and it's a 100-year levee," said Army Corps of Engineers Col. Lewis Setliff. "It got tested, and it passed."

Elsewhere, rivers were still rising in southwest Illinois and parts of Arkansas, chasing people from their homes and into shelters. Rivers had mostly begun receding in Ohio.

At least 17 deaths have been linked to the weather over the past week, and one person was missing in Arkansas.

Thousands of people in Missouri had fled to Red Cross shelters or to the homes of friends or relatives.

The high water pushing against the other side of the Valley Park levee didn't bother customers at Meramec Jack's bar and grill, where owner Tracy Ziegler was pouring cold beer Saturday morning.

Ziegler, 47, had been confident all along that the levee would hold.

"I haven't even lifted my computer off the floor in the office," said Ziegler, who bought the bar in 2005, just after the Army Corps of Engineers finished the levee a few hundred yards away.

In southern Missouri, water poured through several breaches in levees and led authorities to evacuate towns west of Cape Girardeau. At least 200 homes and 13 businesses had been evacuated in Cape Girardeau County, said emergency management director Dick Knaup. At least 70 Missouri counties have reported flooding this week.

Much of the flooding in Illinois was in sparsely populated areas, but several dozen people were evacuated from their homes in Murphysboro on Saturday, said Patti Thompson, a spokeswoman for the Illinois Emergency Management Agency

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=4499930

So in America the barriers are fine, but in the UK they are not? um
 

Gaias Son Aiki (40)
Monday March 24, 2008, 11:51 am
"In southern Missouri, water poured through several breaches in levees and led authorities to evacuate towns west of Cape Girardeau. At least 200 homes and 13 businesses had been evacuated in Cape Girardeau County, said emergency management director Dick Knaup. At least 70 Missouri counties have reported flooding this week. "

I see they are having problems in the US as well with levees breaking due to global warming and climate change. And the Katrina storm was a very hash reminder of that. Now fortunately, as the article just above also points out, people are learning from hard and deadly experiences and building stronger levees that can withstand the extreme weather patterns we see as a result of man made climate changes.

It goes to show the costs societies now have to pay for the rise in CO2 levels and other greenhouse gasses. We are paying for it one way or another, in lives as with Katrina, and in much higher building costs to protect us from more frequent and more extreme weather.

The sooner we start reducing CO human-induced climate change, the better, both financially and in terms of damage and lives lost.
 
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