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Forest Scientists Meet With Cascadia Forest Defenders Treesitters


Environment  (tags: Cascadia Forest Defenders, activists, old growth forest, White Castle, Oregon, clear cutting, logging, spotted owl habitat, scientists, Oregon State University )

Brian
- 456 days ago - eugeneweekly.com
CFD treesitters have taken a stand to protest the pristine, old growth White Castle forest from loggers intent on clear-cutting.



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Comments

Isa Villanen (44)
Saturday June 22, 2013, 2:25 pm
Good for the trees, and I hope something positive will come out of this! Thanks Brian!
The logging has gone too far. The vast forests that used to live in USA have been logged for gos know what, and the treats for sequoias is more than real. I support civil disobedience, like what the treesitters are doing. To us Finnish people that is an old phenomenon, we hat that decades ago. People chained them to trees and kept the keys, and the police could not open the locks, and as they tried to cut the chains, they had to resort to heavy duty metal circular saws and be more than very careful not to hurt the people, they sat so close together. The open logging method is only destructive to nature, because it allows the rain and melting snow erode the top soil and all nutrients away and leaves the surrounding are starved for nutrients. The eroded top soil can damage nearby waters, and cause eutrophication of waters, killing first the most delicate water creatures and exposing the water for algae attacks.

It seems to me that USA is stepping back in time instead of moving to the future. There is a lot of recyclable wood that can be used to create new, weatherproof and hitproof wood-like material without destroying nature, composite wood. It can be used in the garden or in outdoor furniture, it does not rot, it does not release harmful chemicals into the nature... As the forested area on our planet gets smaller, the lexx oxygen it gets, because trees provide the most of the oxygen we breath. The fossil fuel use has already increased the CO2 emission to a dangerous level, and only recently the level hit a record breaking 400 PPM. The present Indonesian forest fires will make a new world record, unfortunately.That is why we need no more logging or deforestation, we need new forests and new rainforests instead. There is only one obstacle in the way: the palm oil, the energy source of the future. The business has nothing to do with cleaner energy or gasoline, and we are losing out oxygen supply little by little.

There is no such thing as scientific logging, it makes me think about the scientific whaling of Japan. The scientists have enough sites to study the effects of logging already. They have also lots of sites to test new tree planting methods that could help in the reforestation of this planet. I just cannot understand the reason behind scientific logging. The idea of dividing the forest in question into to halves is the most ridiculous thing I have heard. Why cannot the scientists leave the Cascadia forests in peace? They try and try, because there is a lot of high quality timber for industrial use. But do w really need that much new timber? Again I call for the recycled wood, and the ecological benefits for using it. Leave the trees alone, we need every single tree in the Cascadia and in every corner of this world.
 

Terry V. (30)
Saturday June 22, 2013, 5:19 pm

"There is something fundamentally wrong with treating the earth as if it were a business in liquidation."
~ Herman Daly


10 Commandments of Mother Earth
 

Brian M. (156)
Saturday June 22, 2013, 10:14 pm
From the article:

"The White Castle pilot project is an unusual kind of logging proposal and it’s led to an unusual forest defender vs. forest scientist dynamic. When forestry professor Norm Johnson of OSU, who created the project along with Jerry Franklin of the University of Washington, found out that the Cascadia Forest Defenders (CFD) had taken to the trees last week to stop the proposed logging, he decided he would head out to the site near Roseburg and talk to the protesters. He went to Berkeley in the ’60s, he says, where, “If you weren’t protesting, then you weren’t awake.”

CFD spokesperson Mary Grace says he will receive a warm welcome and that the treesitters have a lot of questions for Johnson.

Mary Grace says that the treesit was noticed by the Bureau of Land Management on June 12, and since then it has been visited by the BLM and state and local police. “It’s very safe at White Castle — we are very protected,” she jokes. She says the site and access to it has not been closed off.

The CFD press release begins, “Cascadia Forest Defenders are meeting the challenge issued by timber-sponsored forest ecologists, Norm Johnson and Jerry Franklin, at the White Castle Timber Sale located 20 miles east of Myrtle Creek.” It continues, “Treesitters, blockaders and the support crew have found their new home near the headwaters of Myrtle Creek on O&C land about to be logged in the name of science.”

The federal O&C lands have been the center of a debate over how to manage them, with the governor, Rep. Peter DeFazio and Sen. Ron Wyden all attempting to put forth proposals in Congress. The main one calls for dividing the forest between conservation and industrial-type logging.

CFD is targeting scientists rather than the BLM because “the Norm and Jerry show along with the politicians — Wyden, DeFazio — all have the goal of making more land open to logging,” Mary Grace says. She adds, “Most people want forests, not fiber farms” and calls the variable retention harvest a “sneaky backdoor” and a way of saying, “we are not taking all of the forest, so this is not as bad as it could be.”

Johnson and Franklin are both amused at the thought of being linked with the timber industry and its funding. “I am sure that the industry would be aghast to have us identified with their agendas!” Franklin says.

CFD cites Doug of Heiken of Oregon Wild and his criticism of the pilot project as “a cynical attempt to pass off clear-cutting century-old trees as restoration.” Heiken says while Oregon Wild is not involved in the treesit, the group is actively protesting the project. He says, “Oregon Wild is concerned that one million acres of clear-cuts are going to slip through under the label of ‘ecological forestry.’”

Johnson says that clear-cutting (also known as a regeneration harvest) and a variable retention harvest (VRH) are not the same, scientifically, and that they have very different ecological outcomes. “Here’s our puzzle,” he says, “we wanted to create a silvicultural strategy in which we could actually not create a tree farm, but as best we can re-reate a forest.” He says this strategy uses approaches that retain the cycle a forest normally has.

White Castle is a native stand — it has never been logged — whereas the other pilots, including one near Eugene, are in previously logged areas. He says the site “does take your breath away a little.” One goal of the projects, Johnson says, is to create “early seral habitat,” with its bushes, forbs and hardwoods, and help the wildlife that depends on it. “Why wait until they are threatened and endangered?” he asks. Such habitat is lacking in industrial forestland, which uses pesticides to get rid of it. The goal of a VRH is to re-create a more natural forest and to allow for logging as the BLM, which Johnson says no longer logs old growth in western Oregon, runs out of stands of trees to thin.

But if you make even a logged forest complex and beautiful, then Johnson asks, “Do we have the heart to harvest it?” He says, “You see that in the complexity of White Castle; I don’t have the answers, but we need science to illustrate the implications of policy.”

Johnson goes out to the White Castle site to speak with the CFD treesitters as well as to the nearby Buck Rising pilot project on June 20."

 

Edo R. (71)
Monday June 24, 2013, 2:24 am
Thanks for sharing!
 
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