START A PETITION37,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good

How Deaths From Opioids Have Impacted US Life Expectancy


Health & Wellness  (tags: opioids, opioid deaths, all ages, drug abuse, abuse, death, disease, drugs, health, humans, medicine, prevention, risks, science, safety )

Fiona
- 82 days ago - livescience.com
Life expectancy in the United States ticked upward between 2000 and 2015, but that rise was blunted by increasing rates of opioid-related deaths, The 17,400 deaths from opioids in 2000 increased to about 52,400 deaths in 2015



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.

Comments

Fiona O (597)
Thursday September 21, 2017, 6:41 pm
Drug-overdose deaths contributed to a decrease in life expectancy of 0.28 years, with opioid-related deaths accounting for 0.21 years of life expectancy lost, according to the report.

In fact, the loss of life expectancy from drug overdoses was as big as the loss of life expectancy from Alzheimer's disease, suicide, chronic liver disease and septicemia combined, according to the report. The reason the overall loss of life expectancy isn't larger, however, is that death rates from other types of unintentional deaths, such as car accidents, decreased over the course of the study period.

More information on this ongoing tragedy is on site.

Please note, comment, and forward.

 

Past Member (0)
Friday September 22, 2017, 3:45 am
I'm all for human depopulation of this planet ... but not this way.
 

Deka Richardson (3)
Friday September 22, 2017, 8:26 am
Noted.
 

Colleen L (3)
Friday September 22, 2017, 11:08 am
So tragic. Not worth the risk of even take them. Thanks Fiona
 

Judy C (97)
Friday September 22, 2017, 2:50 pm
This is very sad. There's so much attention being brought to this problem now, that maybe this trend will begin to turn around. Addiction is a very difficult disease to treat – especially if the addicted person does not have a desire to change. Desperation is a person's best asset if they want to stop. It takes a certain level of adverse consequences for a person to be completely willing to commit to doing whatever it takes to live free from these substances. As the disease progresses, the rewarding aspects of using the drug are more and more outweighed by negative consequences. In general there is a fairly poor understanding among the public of addiction, and of the recovery process. Thanks for this information, Fiona.
 

Peggy B (39)
Friday September 22, 2017, 9:04 pm
Wow
 
Or, log in with your
Facebook account:
Please add your comment: (plain text only please. Allowable HTML: <a>)


Track Comments: Notify me with a personal message when other people comment on this story


Loading Noted By...Please Wait

 


butterfly credits on the news network

  • credits for vetting a newly submitted story
  • credits for vetting any other story
  • credits for leaving a comment
learn more

Most Active Today in Health & Wellness





 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.

New to Care2? Start Here.