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Wellness Programs: Is It Our Fault We Get Sick?


Health & Wellness  (tags: abuse, americans, cancer, death, diet, disease, drugs, environment, exercise, food, government, healthcare, illness, investigation, prevention, research, society, study, treatment )

Kit
- 754 days ago - truth-out.org
In particular, speakers critically reviewed corporate Wellness Programs that essentially blame personal habits like smoking and excessive eating for poor health and for ballooning medical costs.



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Kit B. (276)
Saturday August 4, 2012, 8:26 pm
The caduceus and a dollar sign - how fitting!


Why do we get sick and how do we get well were the enormously complex and controversial questions explored by a gathering of labor and community activists, health policy experts and academics attending a one-day conference at the University of California Berkeley on July 27th. In particular, speakers critically reviewed corporate Wellness Programs that essentially blame personal habits like smoking and excessive eating for poor health and for ballooning medical costs. Under the soothing, holistic rubric of "Wellness," these employer-sponsored programs are ostensibly designed to improve health. For example, most programs urge employees to stop smoking, lose weight, improve cholesterol and lower blood pressure. These goals appear quite laudable.

Seems like a good idea, everyone wins. Employees get healthier and companies save money on rising health insurance costs? However, opening speaker Lewis Maltby, president of the National Workrights Institute, dryly observed, it seems almost too good to be true. Get my drift? It seems wellness programs are a mixed bag, some do better than others. But they are most ineffectual when following the uniform business model of faulting workers, in this case, for causing steep increases in health care costs.

There are several problems with this corporate blind spot. To begin with, as speakers pointed out, a genuinely comprehensive health care program must involve more than changing personal behavior.

Katy Roemer, a registered nurse (RN) and member of the California Nurses Association/National Nurses United (CNA/NNU), sat next to me in the audience and agreed that "health conditions often have broader social and economic causes for which individuals have no control. For example, obesity, high blood pressure, smoking and elevated cholesterol result from complex factors including poverty, stress and working conditions."

But corporate wellness programs, according to critics, would rather place the blame solely on the plate of individual workers. The worst plans actually infer workers are unhealthy because of bad attitudes.

Jacqueline Hart, a sociologist at Sarah Lawrence College, took the podium and acknowledged that "all of us want people to take personal responsibility for their health but most corporate wellness programs focus on the mind, essentially abandoning the body."

Just Say No! to Your Body

Disregarding crucial warning signals generated by the body's defense system, wellness staff of large businesses repeatedly told Hart that "attitude is the biggest part of health."

"In other words," Hart explained, "it's all in the mind, thus de-legitimatizing use of sick leave" when the body just finally gives out and pleads for a break.

This is bad health policy. Contagious or physically impaired employees should not be at work. This is only one example of how corporate wellness programs, primarily interested in lowering medical insurance costs, often depart from appropriate standards of care.

In other examples cited, the worst of these programs financially penalize employees who do not stop smoking, do not reduce their weight, do not lower their cholesterol or do not decrease their blood pressure.

Again, there are many factors that affect these benchmarks that have nothing to do with personal behavior, DeAnn McEwen, RN, MSN and vice president, NNU, emphasized to me during the conference: "In addition to socio-economic factors, genetic predisposition plays a significant role in determining many health factors including excess weight, high blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol levels."

"As a nurse," Roemer added, "I see the health problems associated with stressful work environments, the collapse of our economy and the pressure of increasing workloads and I am concerned that wellness programs that focus exclusively on individual unhealthy habits are seen as separate from a discussion about these larger issues."

This advice was echoed by panelist Dr. Jeff Ritterman, a retired 30-year Kaiser Permanente cardiologist and prominent community health activist:

"Anti-biotics and vaccines play a huge part improving our health but social factors have by far the biggest influence, much more than anything I do in my office. For example, mortality and class are inextricably linked. The poor die quicker and just like a step ladder your health advantage keeps getting better by degree of your wealth and education."

Dr. Ritterman described how this all works. More income gives you more options and "more autonomy" to make healthy lifestyle choices such as the kind of food you eat. He gave a vivid example of Richmond, California where he serves on the city council.

"Soda-drink companies target the poor communities and those children suffer far higher rates of obesity and diabetes because of its excessive availability." In middle and upper class communities, Ritterman explained, there are many more product alternatives, People have more choices.

Nurse McEwen agreed: "Low-income individuals or racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to have the health conditions that wellness programs target, and, they often face more difficult barriers to achieving better health. These include unsafe neighborhoods, substandard/decaying housing, poor air quality, lack of access to affordable healthy food, and little or no access to public transportation."

Pay or Play

Many wellness programs now charge employees higher premiums if they refuse to participate or if they fail to reach normally prescribed levels for obesity, blood pressure, cholesterol and body mass. As we have seen, these general goals must be interpreted differently for each individual depending on their genetics, physiology and depending where they work and where they live.

Being treated as an individual is the original and fundamental aspect of holistic, wellness care because we actually are all different. But this principal is clearly not sufficiently recognized by the broad brush corporate wellness approach of establishing the same standards for everyone.

Ignoring this genuine holistic method becomes extremely problematic as companies like Wal-Mart begin charging employees who fail to make the average grade up to $2000 a year for health premiums. Legally, federal law already allows companies to pass along 20 percent of premiums to workers who fail to meet wellness standards. This penalty increases to 30 percent in 2014.

Unfortunately, reproaching and targeting some employees for higher health costs gets a hearing among co-workers because of current abysmally low levels of solidarity and class consciousness. This disunity suits the business agenda just fine as it justifies shifting more premium costs to those isolated workers who simply don't fit the corporate health profile of weight, body mass, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

As we have seen, this burden generally falls on the most vulnerable among us and it is those who need healthcare the most. Just as bad, keeping the focus on individual behavior avoids a discussion of more basic social health problems caused by corporate irresponsibility.

Labor journalist and experienced union negotiator Steve Early was also at the conference and suggested very effective negotiating tools to help get around these problems: "In my union bargaining experience, manufacturing employers wanted to get smokers to quit so the company could save on its medical plan costs but management never wanted to address job-related hazards like chemical exposure or excessive noise levels that have an equal or greater impact on workers' health.

"So, when employers try to push wellness programs, unions should always be countering with proposals to reduce forced overtime, to decrease workload or line-speed, to lower related job stress and to prioritize other occupational safety and health problems" that should be part of the discussion.

Now What?

Despite all the problems discussed, panelists still believed wellness programs could actually improve one's health and successfully convince employees to make better health choices if enrollment is genuinely voluntary, if privacy of their health status is absolutely guaranteed and if healthy choices are rewarded such as by employers subsidizing gym memberships, lowering prices for healthy meals in the employee cafeteria and paying for recommended physical examinations.

It also helps, speakers advised, if administration of the wellness program is by a third party and not directly controlled by management. It was pointed out how labor unions UNITE-HERE and SEIU 1199 administer programs that have been extremely successful in reducing costs while also actually markedly improving the health of workers.

Workers trust the union and do not fear retaliation or imposition of added premium costs if they fail to meet certain goals. Professional counseling and group encouragement, indeed, is a healthy environment where one can better succeed.

The concept of wellness originally developed from a critique of western medicine's primary reliance on treatment, largely with drugs from big pharmaceutical companies. Critics describe it this way: "How much can we poison you to kill the thing that is ailing you without actually killing you?"

On the contrary, traditional wellness philosophy emphasizes proper nutrition, exercise, adequate rest and emotional and spiritual balance. Its treats the whole body and not just our various parts and it prioritizes prevention.

If we can successfully introduce these concepts into the wellness debate at the workplace, it will perhaps open further a "healthy" examination within our society of why major corporations pushing their version of wellness are yet allowed to enormously profit from the production and marketing of so many fatty foods, sugary beverages and empty caloric snack products.

In the end, the one-day conference could not and did not attempt to answer all our questions. But it did provide, dare I say, good food for thought.
***


By Carl Finamore, BeyondChron | News Analysis | Truthout |
 

Jason S. (57)
Saturday August 4, 2012, 8:34 pm
thanks
 

Mm M. (449)
Saturday August 4, 2012, 10:58 pm
Outstanding Kit!

Sadly, yes sometimes people are at fault, but with all of the chemicals in food you would have to return to the days of the Native Americans who lived off the land with out Pest Control etc...but, jeepers weren't most of them toothless??? (now got the he he's) Great News Post and going to Share this one! Thanks so much!
 

Phillipa W. (199)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 7:02 am
it doesn't help that when it comes to health there's so much misinformation and outdated information out there and it's so slow to trickle down through the health profession and reach people. It doesn't help when so much food available is essentially poison. It doesn't help when truly unhealthy food is called healthy by so many. Having the Government run simple TV education campaigns which are accurate, ensuring that everyone can get healthy food, and subsidising or even setting up more healthy fast-food/convenience food would go a long way rather than just playing the blame game. Plenty of non-smokers and non-drinkers still live shockingly unhealthy lives and suffer expensive health consequences. I think the time has come when instead of just telling us what not to do, they need to start looking at what THEY can do. So often, people ask about how to live healthy and can't get a straight answer, or face a minefield of info you really need a fair bit of knowledge to navigate your way through. And then they wonder why people don't seem serious about it.
 

Arielle S. (317)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 9:09 am
It's all rather a large mess, isn't it? Bad food, bad air, bad habits, too much stress, too many drugs.....
Saw a piece once asking if a poor family has $5, are they going to spend it on one bag of carrots or will they buy two large bags of potato chips? Seems many of our priorities are in the wrong place but I like to think with awareness comes change.
 

Robert S. (115)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 9:16 am
"As we have seen, this burden generally falls on the most vulnerable among us and it is those who need healthcare the most. Just as bad, keeping the focus on individual behavior avoids a discussion of more basic social health problems caused by corporate irresponsibility.

Labor journalist and experienced union negotiator Steve Early was also at the conference and suggested very effective negotiating tools to help get around these problems: "In my union bargaining experience, manufacturing employers wanted to get smokers to quit so the company could save on its medical plan costs but management never wanted to address job-related hazards like chemical exposure or excessive noise levels that have an equal or greater impact on workers' health.

"So, when employers try to push wellness programs, unions should always be countering with proposals to reduce forced overtime, to decrease workload or line-speed, to lower related job stress and to prioritize other occupational safety and health problems" that should be part of the discussion."

Yup. Thanks Kit
 

Birgitta S. (230)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 10:26 am
Lots of Thank You´s for this, Kit. :-)

i saved the article.
 

Past Member (0)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 10:52 am
Many years ago I regularly got chest infections (usually one a month) even though I lived a very healthy lifestyle and did not smoke or drink. In the end I started smoking and continued to do so for 12 years. In those 12 years I had 2 chest infections. I gave up smoking more than a year ago now. Perhaps in some cases it might be the persons fault if they get sick, due to lifestyle etc. However, I believe its all down to how strong a persons immune system is. Some people only have to think of a cold and they get one while others can be in a room full of sick people and never get ill themselves. Thankfully I fall into the latter group.
 

Robert Hardy (67)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 10:56 am
What a sad society we live in.
 

Kerrie G. (135)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:08 am
Noted, thanks.
 

Micheael Kirkbym (85)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:12 am
Every thing we eat; the water we drink; the air we breathe are all designed to maximize profit at our expense. Remember that fast foods, comfort foods, sodas are all designed to addict you to convenience and to make you sick. It is our responsibility to be aware of what we are putting in our bodies. It is our responsibiltiy to realize that also important is how we think. It is all about profit to the people behind big pharma; big medicine; big life insurance; manufacturing and Big Energy. Of course if you die before your time then the IRS claims the estate tax and a nice big profit goes to the boys in the Upper Echelon club through the Fed.
 

Cynthia Davis (340)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:40 am
A quote from the article....."How much can we poison you to kill the thing that is ailing you without actually killing you?"
 

Kit B. (276)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:58 am

Could it be not the smoking or drinking or even use of sugary beverages that underlie the illness? What of the tremendous, daily stress that we as society live under? I do realize that neither an employer nor any health insurance company nor the corporate entities would want to consider this obvious possibility. We live under constant STRESS, induced by the economy and the foul environment of polluted air, water and soil. Our bodies are filled with toxins from these elements that also put our bodies as well as our mind in a state of chemically induced stress. Think beyond the propaganda and look around at the reality.

This does not mean that smoking, drinking, and most of our prepared food products should not be scrutinized by each of us, only that it is a cheap "cop-out" to reduce all illness to things we do and not look farther.
 

Val R. (239)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 12:06 pm
Vaccines have poison in them, fluoride is poisonous, the foods we eat are heavily intoxicated with bad things for us, the water we drink is poisonous, the air we breathe is poisonous - so let's have a wellness program to pretend we care.
 

Robert S. (115)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 1:05 pm
"It is our responsibility to be aware of what we are putting in our bodies."

That is true to the extent that we may at this time be able to do it in this world where toxins are found in even the most conscious and fastidious and privileged mothers milk. We are at a point where there is no where to hide. We can as I earlier suggested make the best of a bad situation, but that is not to say that we can at this point even with great effort...be toxin free, as should be the norm. This is not our grandfathers world we live in now, It was a smaller dump-site than some of our industrial dumpers knew or cared to know. We now know. What do we do with that info. Thats the task.
 

jan b. (3)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 1:24 pm
Tibetan diet consists mostly of meat, milks and other high-protein foods. In fact, it is not uncommon for a Tibetan monk to live to 100 or even 120 years .....Given the fact that scientists are going to investigate some 100 year olds who claim they either smoke, drink alcohol, eat fatty foods or a bad diet overall ........I would say the answer is ....no one knows for certain....
 

Kit B. (276)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 1:27 pm

The is a world that comes from the most bizarre of imaginations, one in which everything is potentially dangerous and is causing those most vulnerable, children and the elderly to easily become ill. I strongly believe that those who have caused this should be held accountable for the clean-up.

It's so easy to blame a smoker for his illness, while we ignore an environment full of toxins.
 

Lois Jordan (55)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 1:44 pm
Thanks for posting this great article, Kit! Very thorough. When the Dr. told my mom her cholesterol level was very high, she went on a diet of tofu, greens, oatmeal...(you get the idea)---and she started yoga, but just couldn't get the levels down. She had gone through an extremely stressful period...death of my dad, her dad...and was just stressed out and couldn't get relief. Within months, she died of brain cancer. Glad to see this article pointed out the variables. Alternative medicine should be included--acupuncture, herbal meds, homeopathics...here in Tucson, Dr. Andrew Weil has the Integrative Medicine Clinic connected to University Hospital, and he and his staff are doing some great work there!
 

Yvonne White (231)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 4:55 pm
I have to say that doctors get very irritable when you smoke and they do all those tests and Can't find anything wrong!;) I had my first physical in 15 years early this year, because I finally had Insurance..I think sometimes that staying away from doctors is what kept me from getting sick!
 

Kit B. (276)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 5:51 pm

Lois Jordan - I've read many articles by and about Dr Weil, so that's ONE good thing about Arizona...still only one. For high cholesterol people can take high levels of fish oil or take lower levels consistently. I'm so sorry about the loss of your Mom.

Yvonne, I do agree. Avoiding doctors is a big step to avoiding unnecessary medications and the side effects.
 

Amanda Adams (201)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 6:12 pm
Thank you
 

pam w. (191)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 8:11 pm
The American diet is JUNK and I beleive that costs us untold amounts of money and personal suffering.

I work in a zoo and have an educational station fairly close to the entrance. I can't tell you how deeply disgusting it is for me to see the large numbers of obese children waddling past me, jamming candy or chips into their mouths, mindlessly chewing as they go! Anyone who allows their child to become/remain obese should be counseled somehow and made to understand they're condemning that child to a lifetime of poor health.

Kit says " We live under constant STRESS, induced by the economy and the foul environment of polluted air, water and soil. Our bodies are filled with toxins from these elements that also put our bodies as well as our mind in a state of chemically induced stress."

+++++++++++++++ I agree about the environmental pollution but I"m not sure about the stress. Certainly, people have been made ill by constant stress but, if you consider human history, I think ALL humans have had stresses, some much worse than what we deal with every day. I actually think stress can be GOOD for us by sharpening our thoughts and keeping the adrenaline levels flowing.

 

Kara C. (15)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 8:40 pm
If you smoke and have lung problems its your fault. If you binge drink and your liver fails, its your fault. If you never exercise and eat junk food all the time then when your heart gives out there is nobody to blame but yourself. It is called personal responsibility, not poverty (if you can afford McDonalds you can afford vegetables), its not stress (10 minutes with a punching bag will get rid of that) and its certainly not working conditions (making 15 minutes to cook a healthy meal while doing basic exercises in the kitchen is not hard!)
 

Kathy Chadwell (371)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:55 pm
Personally, I blame it in pollution
 

Kathy Chadwell (371)
Sunday August 5, 2012, 11:58 pm
10 minutes with a punching bag Kara? Maybe if the punching bag is an animal abuser, or corrupt politician. Other than that,,, hitting an innocent punching bag ain't going to do a thing for me
 

june t. (65)
Monday August 6, 2012, 12:44 am
noted
 

Sasha M. (0)
Monday August 6, 2012, 1:36 am
noted
 

Terrie Williams (769)
Monday August 6, 2012, 11:44 am
Not even gonna start.......I don't need my stress levels any higher than they already are....yeah, Kathy I agree.....give me a 'Dogman' or a 'Chester the molester' to beat the ever-lovin' perverbial dog caca out of on a daily basis and I'd be stress free.....maybe.

Yeah, I smoke....MY CHOICE.....my PERSONAL RESPONSIBILTY....doubt that is what is gonna kill me since just about everyone in my entire family smokes or smoked.....90% of my immediate and extended family lived or is living into their MID TO LATE FRIKKEN NINTIES.

Said I wasn't gonna start...too late.....gonna shut up now before I get even more irritated.
 

Kit B. (276)
Monday August 6, 2012, 12:50 pm

Wow Kara, you should be writing for an insurance company or the government. Just keep yourself well hidden from any real problems that affect real people. Smoking, drinking, and eating habits are all a part of the Great American Propaganda driven - "it's all your fault", campaign. Real stress, deep stress from loss of home, job, or having a spouse that beats the crap out of his wife and not a punching bag - will not be fixed by your terse recommendations.
If you can afford McDonald's you can afford decent food - well any one who has ever shopped in a grocery store knows that is not true.

I guess those who are living in the north Texas communities that are suffering from an invasion of West Nile Virus, should be blamed for living here?

There seems to be a word missing from your vocabulary, COMPASSION!
 

Lois Jordan (55)
Monday August 6, 2012, 1:59 pm
@Kit: Thanks for your condolences....Mom's been gone 20 yrs. now; medicine's changed a lot since then, but the tumor she had is still hard to "cure." Regarding environment V. lifestyle...one sister lived in Northern CA and smoked, drinked....was a "free spirit who enjoyed her life". Her sister who lived in So. CA was a teetotaler, nonsmoker, churchgoer, pillar of society...who died of cancer in her 50's. As far as I know, 30 yrs. later, the other sister's still alive and kicking. Just sayin'.....
 

Lois Jordan (55)
Monday August 6, 2012, 2:35 pm
@Kit: Thanks for your condolences--Mom's been gone 20 yrs. now, and I believe the brain tumor she had is still a difficult one to cure. Re: Lifestyle V. Environment---I'll never forget my uncle's mom who lived in So. CA. She was a teetotaler, nonsmoker, churchgoer, wealthy pillar of society...and died of cancer in her 50's. Her sister who lived in No. CA was a smoker, drinker, "free spirit"....who lived decades longer. Just sayin'.....
 

Robert S. (115)
Monday August 6, 2012, 3:29 pm
For the most part, drinking everyday, and smoking all the time will age anyone. And kill quite a few. Once your liver goes, your on you way out, and smoking...well, more deaths are caused each year by tobacco use than by all deaths from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, suicides, and murders combined.Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.
Cigarette smoking causes about 1 of every 5 deaths in the United States each year.



Cigarette use causes premature death:

On average, adults who smoke cigarettes die 14 years earlier than nonsmokers.
Based on current cigarette smoking patterns, an estimated 25 million Americans who are alive today will die prematurely from smoking-related illnesses, including 5 million people younger than 18 years of age.

I don't think they are making these stats up. I smoked on and off for many years, but getting out of breath easily sucks. So I stopped. 9 years ago now. My program was don't have a drink until I've licked it. And I did. Now since I don't drink to excess anymore, mostly :)...a glass or two of wine mellows me nicely, and the smell of Cigs makes my gag.

Someone said to me when I was about 45 someone said to me...aren't you too old to be still smoking. I thought about it, and decided they were right. Don't think I'd still be here if I hadn't.

 

Robert S. (115)
Monday August 6, 2012, 4:05 pm
If you reverse that, and said teetotaler drank and smoked, that fact would not have cured the Cancer. The reaper, picks randomly it seems, and some are stronger than others, but those who take poison will suffer its effects, albeit some more and sooner than others. To your point, we will all die anyway one way or another of something. Poisoning ourselves simply stacks the deck against one, as taking poison must. Randomness can not be denied, but playing Russian Roulette takes at least some out the randomness out of the equation, and the game takes its toll even if you have the constitution of a bull elephant. If I hadn't kicked my own ass so often, I think I'd still be getting carded.:)
 

Kit B. (276)
Monday August 6, 2012, 5:44 pm

Therefore, those who live to a ripe age in their 70's, 80's or some even to their 90's and still smoke and drink are just lucky? I don't really argue the point that almost anything we do to excess can harm us, and smoking does lead to problems, as does excessive drinking. I still don't see how that prevents any of us from getting ill from an environment filled with toxins. Before we are so quick to blame our "habits" is it not time to look directly at the cause of so much illness, from cancer to asthma the chances are far greater that it stems from a fully polluted air, water and soil.
 

Robert S. (115)
Monday August 6, 2012, 8:06 pm
just lucky?

Lucky to be stronger in terms of tolerance, since we don't get to pick our own genes...Yes. I would not argue that toxins from our environment involuntarily are no more or less toxic than those taken in voluntarily. The variables are our particular individual reactions/tolerance, toxicity, amount and duration...no matter the source. Certainly with self administered poisons we have a choice. The choice of our poisons should certainly be ours alone and not secreted into our diets our water our air...etc.
 

Penelope P. (222)
Monday August 6, 2012, 10:36 pm
SUM INTERESTING QUOTES
QUOTE

obesity, high blood pressure, smoking and elevated cholesterol result from complex factors including poverty, stress and working conditions."
QUOTE

"attitude is the biggest part of health."

"In other words," Hart explained, "it's all in the mind, thus de-legitimatizing use of sick leave" when the body just finally gives out and pleads for a break.

This is bad health policy. Contagious or physically impaired employees should not be at work. This is only one example of how corporate wellness programs, primarily interested in lowering medical insurance costs, often depart from appropriate standards of care.
QUOTE

DeAnn McEwen, RN, MSN and vice president, NNU, emphasized to me during the conference: "In addition to socio-economic factors, genetic predisposition plays a significant role in determining many health factors including excess weight, high blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol levels."
QUOTE

Low-income individuals or racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to have the health conditions that wellness programs target, and, they often face more difficult barriers to achieving better health. These include unsafe neighborhoods, substandard/decaying housing, poor air quality, lack of access to affordable healthy food, and little or no access to public transportation."
QUOTE
examination within our society of why major corporations pushing their version of wellness are yet allowed to enormously profit from the production and marketing of so many fatty foods, sugary beverages and empty caloric

COMENT
These health drives seem to be part of a current trend to rely on hype.Also of course to blame the victim

They are ancilliary to our senseless idea of personal responsibility to go it alone ness . Anyone with half an eye or a brain realises today that we are all dependent on one another-We can be as independent as all hell and still
even though living in a hut in the pristine wilderness suffer from acid rain ,drought and diseases fostered by our fellows passing through the borders.

Actually everyone seems to have steered clear of mentioning one very strong cause of disease and disablement the work conditions themselves
 

Christy V. (36)
Tuesday August 7, 2012, 11:10 am
Noted and thanks.
 

Kit B. (276)
Tuesday August 7, 2012, 11:27 am

Welcome back Christy, it's been a while since you were here.
 

Robert S. (115)
Tuesday August 7, 2012, 1:43 pm
Stress as Kit has pointed out... is a big factor. Working conditions even if safe from toxins sicken, age us, cause accidents as happened often among fellow workers on sets, locations, on the road home from work... throughout my career with repeated extremely long days. Week after week, with short turnarounds. Exhaustion kills. We used to call overtime, blood money because 14, 16, 18 hour days were common and repeated day after day. In addition, sets were often not at all free of toxins, and extremely long hours was far from the only stressful exhausting thing going on. The need to perform at a high level when millions are on the line...is well, stressful. More so than making a salad.
 

Robert O. (12)
Wednesday August 8, 2012, 4:15 pm
Thanks Kit.
 

Jennifer C. (172)
Monday August 13, 2012, 6:20 am
Noted. Thanks.
 
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