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Even Doubters Want to Prepare for Global Warming


Environment  (tags: animals, climate-change, CO2emissions, conservation, destruction, ecosystems, endangered, energy, environment, forests, globalwarming, greenhousegases, habitatdestruction, healthconditions, nature, oceans, politics, pollution, protection, research, scienc )

Kit
- 532 days ago - livescience.com
In fact, even 60 percent of climate-change doubters favored preparations, the survey found.



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Kit B. (276)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 6:25 am
Sea level rise is swamping coasts; Rodanthe in the Outer Banks of North Carolina is pictured.
PHOTO CREDIT: Andrew Kemp, Yale University


Some still insist that climate change is a hoax, but the vast majority of Americans believe the globe is warming, a new survey finds and they want to prepare for the worst.

In fact, even 60 percent of climate-change doubters favored preparations, the survey found. Researchers collected opinions between March 3 and March 18 via an online questionnaire, using a nationally representative sample of 1,174 American adults, both English and Spanish speaking.

The survey asked about climate-change beliefs and support for adaptation strategies to help coastal areas cope with the rising sea levels and frequent, intense storms that a warmer world could bring. The results showed that 82 percent of Americans are in favor of preparation.


Sea level rise is swamping coasts; Rodanthe in the Outer Banks of North Carolina is pictured.
[Pin It] Sea level rise is swamping coasts; Rodanthe in the Outer Banks of North Carolina is pictured.
CREDIT: Andrew Kemp, Yale University
View full size image

Some still insist that climate change is a hoax, but the vast majority of Americans believe the globe is warming, a new survey finds and they want to prepare for the worst.

In fact, even 60 percent of climate-change doubters favored preparations, the survey found. Researchers collected opinions between March 3 and March 18 via an online questionnaire, using a nationally representative sample of 1,174 American adults, both English and Spanish speaking.

The survey asked about climate-change beliefs and support for adaptation strategies to help coastal areas cope with the rising sea levels and frequent, intense storms that a warmer world could bring. The results showed that 82 percent of Americans are in favor of preparation.

"Few people believe these preparations will harm the economy or eliminate jobs," survey director Jon Krosnick, a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University, said in a statement. "In fact, more people believe that preparation efforts will help the economy and create jobs around the U.S., in their state and in their town than think these efforts will harm the economy and result in fewer jobs in those areas.

"But people want coastal homeowners and businesses that locate in high-risk areas to pay for these measures," he said.

The survey found high levels of belief in global warming, with 82 percent of respondents agreeing that Earth's temperatures have risen over the last century. People tended to see efforts to hold back Mother Nature as futile, Krosnick said. Instead, they preferred preparation strategies that would reduce exposure to risk. For example, 48 percent of respondents supported sand dune restoration, and 33 percent favored replenishing eroding beaches with sand.

At the same time, 37 percent said structures should be moved inland to protect them from flooding and storm surges, and 33 percent supported the construction of sea walls. [Weather vs. Climate: Test Yourself]

The most popular policy suggestions were the strengthening of coastal building codes to minimize damage from storms and flooding (supported by 62 percent of respondents), and the prevention of new construction close to the coast (supported by 51 percent).

"The question is, how does public support for preparation translate to action?" said Meg Caldwell, executive director of the Center for Ocean Solutions, which co-commissioned the survey.

"Our impulse is to try to move quickly to put communities back together the way they were after devastation. But that impulse often leads to doubling down on high-risk investments, such as rebuilding in areas likely to experience severe impacts," Caldwell said in a statement. "To move toward long-term resiliency for coastal communities, we need to seize opportunities to apply new thinking, new standards and long-term solutions."

Krosnick presented the results of the survey March 28 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
****

By: Stephanie Pappas | Live Science | Senior Writer |

 

Lin Penrose (92)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 10:35 am
Thanks Kit. This survey is focused on ocean levels rising and possible preparations. Like preparing for an extra long and extreme hurricane season.

The impacts of climate change are so far reaching on all the planet, and on most ecosystems that support life to which we have become accustomed, there is No Where to Hide from the changes. We must adapt, and quickly. However, we humans have polluted, changed, and are in the rapid process of destroying and consuming our support structures for positive adaptability. The natural climate changes of this planet are extremely hard on life forms. Combined with the changes we humans have made, there are a few thousand years of nasty days ahead.
 

Tamara Noforwardsplz (185)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 11:01 am
Lin hit the nail on the head. I agree that coastal communities are definitely going to have to come up with plans to protect the beaches etc. Building close to the water at this point makes no sense. Climate change IS happening and to do so would be nothing short of disastrous. But as Lin said, it is happening across the globe and there is nowhere to hide. At this point we have to invest in protective measures rather than continuing on the destructive bent we are on now. Creating jobs that deal with climate change would go a long way to helping to stabilize the economy and we have to invest in green living. We must stop this addiction to fossil fuels, destructive mining, fracking and mountain top removal. The cattle industry and deforestation have to be stopped, it is killing this planet. Renewable resources have to be jump started and we need more organic farming. GMOs have to go. There is so much destruction happening that we are indeed creating a nightmare for all future generations. Noted, twittered and google shared. Thanks Kit.
 

lee e. (114)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 12:00 pm
Most "climate deniers" are only denying that humans are the cause and that this is a natural shift, so yes they would want efforts to be made to prevent certain areas from being affected, however a large problem still exists in that the contributing factors to the global warming will still be denied and science will also be denied even in light of the droughts, fires, decreasing water supply (potable) - this as we frack using millions of gallons of water per well - and super storms become increasingly more frequent , and sea levels rising - they're all inter-connected and urgently necessitate immediate actions world wide - from all countries - we should take the lead, and assemble empathetic nations -- it has already been addressed in the UN - and now is the time to make changes happen in a "Kennedy-esque race to the moon" sort of way -- we have the ingenuity - it must be implemented and invested in by severe taxation on wealthy corporations and fines on those that contribute to the carbon emissions!
 

Brian M. (145)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 12:29 pm
A jobs program, such as proposed in the Green New Deal, that would put millions of Americans to work modernizing the infrastructure and transitioning this nation away from dirty energy to clean, renewable energy would be a benefit to both the economy and the environment. Such a program would also include efforts to prepare for climate change impacts that we can no longer avoid.
 

Angelika R. (143)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 1:02 pm
"using a nationally representative sample of 1,174 American adults, both English and Spanish speaking."
This is stunning to me- just over a thousand people representative for a nation with over 300 bn ??
When we have such polls we also question 1000 people representative for all of Germany ! (a good 80bn!)

It is more than natural that ALL want to prepare and Lee already said it all! Deniers= liers, they do know.
 

Bryna Pizzo (139)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 3:19 pm
Thank you! (N, P, T)
 

greenplanet e. (157)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 6:49 pm
I really worry about widespread droughts and how we are going to survive.
 

Betsy Bee (1055)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 7:02 pm
I doubt there is any effective preparation for everything climate change is bringing. How do you stop ocean acidification and rising sea levels? How do the millions and millions who will not be able to continue living in low lying areas prepare? How do the one billion who live on a subsistence level from fishing prepare as the fish and shellfish die from the increasing acidity of the oceans?
 

Susanne R. (249)
Tuesday April 2, 2013, 11:39 pm
It seems that the doubters aren't living in a fool's paradise after all...
 

Gene Jacobson (252)
Wednesday April 3, 2013, 9:42 am
"Some still insist that climate change is a hoax, but the vast majority of Americans believe the globe is warming, a new survey finds and they want to prepare for the worst. "

Worst case scenario, which I think likely, we will lose much of our coastal areas, I saw one projection that had 2/3's of Florida underwater and much of NYC as well. As I thought about that, it occurred to me that the only people who can afford to live on coastal land now are the 1% and the businesses that provide them their largesse. So, I wonder if the Koch boys have sold their Florida homes yet and moved inland. The cost in human terms is staggering, I can't imagine a scenario where insurance companies could pay what they will have to for all that land along the eastern and western coasts that now is filled with very high priced resorts, homes, businesses. They'd all go bankrupt. Sort of makes me happier about my Swedish ancestors having unerringly found the middle of this continent to settle in, cold though it may be, it is high and dry and will stay that way, though I did see another projected map that had a huge inland see essentially dividing he country in two. Much of this we here won't see in our lifetimes but it is coming, inexorably and unavoidably it would seem. It is those who come after us who I feel sorriest for as they try to deal with the mess our generation created and left for them to live with.
 

Angelika R. (143)
Wednesday April 3, 2013, 10:12 am
Gene is raising good points there. As for insurance companies, neither could I imagine any of them would pay. Most, if not all of OUR insurance companies have a provision in their contracts that explicitly EXCLUDES coverage of any damages caused by "natural and unpreventable disasters" ! Only exception are lightning strikes.

But the 1% can of course afford companies like LLoyds who will most likely assure anything if you can pay their premiums.
 

Robert B. (57)
Wednesday April 3, 2013, 5:58 pm
Unless we act on a MASSIVE scale worldwide, we are in for a very rough ride.
 

Munro Tapper (80)
Thursday April 4, 2013, 11:35 am
The doubters of climate change are struggling to remain doubters or they paid off scientists. This is not being cynical, this is being realistic.
 

Mitchell D. (131)
Thursday April 4, 2013, 5:49 pm
Those still doubting climate change, for real, must be people who watch, and believe, Fox news.
Others who claim doubt, I expect, are focused on the next quarter's earnings report, and wanting to avoid spending money on remediation, which might cut into their profits, or bonuses, myopically focusing only on greed.
 

Craig Pittman (45)
Friday April 5, 2013, 5:28 am
Now here is an interesting thought, someone suing an Insurance company over non payment based on their clause "unpreventable disasters". I'd say a lot of this is caused by human action and is therefore very much preventable.
There are so many consequences of climate change. Another huge one of course is drought.
 

Michela m. (3924)
Monday April 8, 2013, 4:48 pm
Noted!!
 

Michela m. (3924)
Monday April 8, 2013, 5:32 pm


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s.parameswaran Shanmugam (11)
Tuesday April 9, 2013, 8:05 am
noted
 

Jude Hand (59)
Monday April 15, 2013, 11:04 am
Noted and read.
 

Muriel Servaege (45)
Tuesday April 23, 2013, 11:12 am
Noted. Thank you, Kit and Michela.
 
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