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The Slaughter of Muslims


World  (tags: muslims, muslim, islam, religion, religions, religious intolerance, conflict, death, europe, government, HumanRights, politics, usa, war, world, asia, united states, stop the hate )

Syd
- 314 days ago - slate.com
How Do You End Up Slaughtering Muslims? By Blaming Muslims For Religious Violence...



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Comments

Syd H. (48)
Monday February 17, 2014, 1:55 am

Those damned Muslims. You can’t trust them. They’d just as soon kill you as look at you.

That’s the way a lot of Americans felt after 9/11. The fever rose so high that leaders of the Republican Party said no mosque should be allowed near the site of the attack.

This kind of thinking is deeply dangerous. It confuses the universal cause of religious violence—indiscriminate hatred—with a particular religion. And this mistake can lead to two tragedies. One is the adoption of indiscriminate hatred by those who claim to oppose it. The other is the fatal infliction of this hatred on innocent people.

That’s what is now happening in Africa and Asia, according to reports issued this week by Amnesty International and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Amnesty’s report, released yesterday, summarizes the African crisis:

“Ethnic cleansing” of Muslims has been carried out in the western part of the Central African Republic, the most populous part of the country, since early January 2014. Entire Muslim communities have been forced to flee, and hundreds of Muslim civilians who have not managed to escape have been killed by the loosely organized militias … At least 200 Muslims have been killed and hundreds more injured …

Meanwhile, the U.N. announced that tomorrow it is sending a human rights investigator to Myanmar. The investigator will meet with Muslim and Buddhist representatives, following a January incident in which “at least 40 Rohingya Muslim men, women and children were killed.” The New York Times explains the context:

The area where the attacks occurred has been torn by tensions between its Buddhist population and Muslims known as Rohingya, with frequent bursts of violence driving more than 100,000 Rohingya Muslims from their homes and leaving at least 200 dead.

Muslims are part of the violence, too. The U.N. notes that the massacre in Myanmar followed a clash “in which a police sergeant was captured and killed by the Rohingya villagers.” In the Central African Republic, attacks on Muslims came before and after “young Muslims … retaliated in a killing spree.” Amnesty tells the whole story:

Since the mostly Muslim Seleka coalition seized power in March 2013, the country has been shattered by violence, much of it against members of the Christian community. The Seleka, which left power in mid-January 2014, killed thousands of Christian civilians, and looted and burned thousands of Christian homes. The lawless and abusive nature of their rule gave rise to unprecedented sectarian violence and hatred, with many Christians attributing responsibility for the Seleka’s abuses to the country’s Muslim minority as a whole. Their fear, anger, and desire for revenge spurred the development of the predominantly Christian anti-balaka. … In town after town, as soon as the Seleka left, the anti-balaka moved in and launched violent attacks on the Muslim minority.

The lesson here isn’t that all Muslims are innocent, or that Christians and Buddhists are dangerous, or that one religion is worse than another. The lesson is that the more you fixate on blaming one religion, the more you sink into the cycle of sectarian hatred. And when restraint and self-restraint give way, you end up with sectarian violence. Calling yourself a follower of Buddha or Christ won’t save you from taking part in the persecution. What will save you is understanding that the principles of peace, justice, and respect for others are bigger than your religion, or anyone else’s.

 

Syd H. (48)
Monday February 17, 2014, 4:46 am


A little more history (that helps explain a lot of modern day events):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partitioning_of_the_Ottoman_Empire

 

John Holton (361)
Monday February 17, 2014, 4:47 am
S and N
 

Past Member (0)
Monday February 17, 2014, 8:53 am
There is far too much hate in the world. Things always go wrong when one power exerts itself over people from other natiions without much thought to how people need to live. I visited the World War I buriel sites at Gallipoli (Turkey) a number of years ago. I was quite taken with the story from both sides of the war. To this day I think Winston Churchill was a terrible man - he sent good people to their deaths knowing full well it would happen. The Turks have honoured all those dead men as much as their own. I was truly touched by the number of Turkish people who visited the Commonwealth Graves as well as those of the Turks.

I fully recommend that all children everywhere, should see some of the war graves... they are sobering and a reminder that verbal conflict can lead to much worse.
 

Syd H. (48)
Monday February 17, 2014, 9:05 am

Thank you Col. I will look up that site as I'll be back in Turkey soon.

I too was touched by the care, concern, and genuine interest of the Turkish people during the months I was there before. I've never been in a more welcoming society. Yet even though I knew better I still had fear infecting me from the society I grew up in before I left.

Maybe travel should be mandatory... =]



 

Roger Skinner (14)
Monday February 17, 2014, 11:01 am
I can't make my mind whether religion promotes irrationality or whether it causes insanity. In either case, it sure seems to cause an inordinate amount of strife.
 

Bob P. (421)
Monday February 17, 2014, 12:30 pm
thanks for the article
 

jess b (24)
Monday February 17, 2014, 10:05 pm
people cause strife, with or without religion - religion is, sometimes, the blind spot, some people use to point fingers or not take a good look at themselves.
Groups have used 'religion'/ idolatry, etc., for self interests, since the beginning of mankind, apparently.
"Teaching', or controlling/managing groups and individual status, originates within, and without, successive establishments of 'hierarchy' and 'consensus'.
History shows us, over and over, that people are mostly the same. Greed, shame and many other factors cause people to see things differently.
"Religion" is the symptom, not the problem.
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Tuesday February 18, 2014, 5:49 am
I think this paragraph said it all.....

The lesson here isn’t that all Muslims are innocent, or that Christians and Buddhists are dangerous, or that one religion is worse than another. The lesson is that the more you fixate on blaming one religion, the more you sink into the cycle of sectarian hatred. And when restraint and self-restraint give way, you end up with sectarian violence. Calling yourself a follower of Buddha or Christ won’t save you from taking part in the persecution. What will save you is understanding that the principles of peace, justice, and respect for others are bigger than your religion, or anyone else’s.

Thank you for posting an important lesson.
 

Evelyn B. (49)
Tuesday April 15, 2014, 1:51 pm
Syd, Thanks for posting this, it's an very valuable article. I hope/ wish that it be read by many people who are currently trapped in a "hate" mode - as we've seen on C2NN all too often!

I like Dandelion's selected quote, but my preferred one is:
"This kind of thinking is deeply dangerous. It confuses the universal cause of religious violence—indiscriminate hatred—with a particular religion. And this mistake can lead to two tragedies. One is the adoption of indiscriminate hatred by those who claim to oppose it. The other is the fatal infliction of this hatred on innocent people."
 

Evelyn B. (49)
Tuesday April 15, 2014, 2:16 pm
If not already done, people might like to sign this petition:
Stop the hate
 

Donna B. (99)
Tuesday April 15, 2014, 2:49 pm
Thank you Syd for posting. Thank you Evelyn for reminding folks to sign the Stop hate petition.I find this Quote to be appropriate . Compassion is sometimes the fatal capacity for feeling what it is like to live inside somebody else's skin. It is the knowledge that there can never really be any peace and joy for me until there is peace and joy finally for you too.
Frederick Buechner
my felling is in a simple statement HUMANKIND BE BOTH. we all should not judge it is not for us to do that we should Welcome all sizes, all colors,all ages, all cultures, all sexes, all beliefs, all religions, all types, all people should be safe wise words from a friend.
 

Inge Bjorkman (147)
Tuesday April 15, 2014, 11:35 pm
History repeats itself, Roma, Jews, Christians, Buddhists, Hindus and Muslims, the power of the so-called strong leaders have always used people's hatred to justify their wars and exterminations.
There are always politicians and religious leaders who infuse hatred in people.

Love, Peace and Understanding
 

Syd H. (48)
Wednesday April 16, 2014, 12:38 am

Thanks everyone for the renewed interest on this topic. Wish it had better attention when I first put it up because it was in response to the organized C2 hate gang. :(

Here is another very recent submission by another member here on this topic:

http://www.care2.com/news/member/952030111/3762046

Please go note it up for everyone else to see hopefully. :)
 

Eleonora Oldani (46)
Thursday April 17, 2014, 2:03 pm

Thanks Syd for this interesting article.

Inge - I'd like to expand your line "There are always politicians and religious leaders who infuse hatred in people." in adding "for ulterior motives". Religions - expecially Judaism, Christianity and Islam - have always been used and abused as fig leaves in order to attain power and personal gains.

As I always say: "While there are plenty of bad people who happen to belong to one religion or another, I do not believe there is a person who is bad just because he/she happens to belong to a certain religion – culture or race for that matter."

It's such a handy "excuse" as most people don't know much about other religions ... why should they if they (all) bellieve that theirs is the only right one - LOL?
 

Eleonora Oldani (46)
Thursday April 17, 2014, 2:06 pm

To Evelyn - you wouldn't happen to have the "e-Brigade" in mind when you choose your quote ...?!

Stay safe!
 
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