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An Oregonian Killed the Intelligence Authorization Act


US Politics & Gov't  (tags: Human Rights, Intelligence, Oregon )

TomCat
- 517 days ago - politicsplus.org
See 1st comment.



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Comments

TomCat S. (285)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 9:46 am
I have watched the development of the Intelligence Authorization Act for 2013 with growing concern. I recognize the need to maintain the security of properly classified information. At the same time, I recognize the need to protect whistle blowers and those who report their discoveries of information that is improperly classified to cover up embarrassing and/or criminal acts. The provisions in this act were so one sided as to effectively muzzle the 4th estate. Sadly, too many Democrats, especially Diane Feinstein (D-CA), supported this measure, without considering the ramifications of putting such capacity to abuse power into the hands of future Republicans. I am proud to report that my Senator has killed the bill.
 

Kit B. (277)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 10:54 am

Now there is where we just might differ. I have to suggest that none, not one the Senators or House members that supported this did so, without knowing exactly what it was, how it could be used, and what extreme powers it gives to the Oval office. These people are not "babe in the woods".
 

Kit B. (277)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 10:57 am

I have to say we need many, many more like Ron Wyden from Oregon. Hint, this is meant to be a government for the people, of the people, not to squash the people.

"I think Congress should be extremely skeptical of any anti-leaks bills that threaten to encroach upon the freedom of the press, or that would reduce access to information that the public has a right to know," Wyden said in a floor statement publicly announcing his hold. "Without transparent and informed public debate on foreign policy and national security topics, American voters would be ill-equipped to elect the policymakers who make important decisions in these areas."
 

Pat A. (117)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 11:26 am
God bless Senator Ron Wyden - an intelligent and moral man! (He looks very stressed in that photo - I do hope it is an old photo and that things have improved).
 

John B. (215)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 3:08 pm
Thanks Tom for the post. Kudos to Senator Wyden for his action. I have repeatedly communicated with Senator Sherrod Brown my deep concerns regarding this piece of legislation to no avail it seems. Read and noted.
 

Terrie Williams (753)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 3:58 pm
If only all the rest ofthem were like him, what a different governing body it would be!
 

Beverly T. (82)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 4:24 pm
Whistle whistle clap hands stamp stamp stamp.
The Rethugs themselves have twice...TWICE in the last year endangered National security with there "leaks".
Has anyone brought them up on charges?
Noooooo
WTF....if they want to make a law like that then they should suffer the consequences of a law like that.
Let's remember this guy for future positions....
Like...would he want to run for President ??
 

Dave C. (204)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 5:11 pm
thanks, Tom and Mr. Wyden.....
 

Anne F. (17)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 7:20 pm
Kudos to Senator Wyden for his action
 

Aranza Diaz (22)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 7:29 pm
thanks for sharing
 

Aranza Diaz (22)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 7:29 pm
:)
 

Mary away T. (188)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 7:52 pm
Thanks Tom, And a big thanks to Senator Wyden.
 

JL A. (269)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 9:07 pm
And I want us all to remember "The Pentagon Papers" much of which were deemed improperly classified as classified.........
 

Edith B. (141)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 9:18 pm
Thank goodness we had senator who had some sense.
 

Lynn Squance (219)
Thursday November 15, 2012, 11:30 pm
Whistleblowers, whether they be the press, civil servants, or your average employee, are important. To effectively silence them in unacceptable. There are great risks to being a whistleblower, risks that not just anyone will take. The only ones that would fear a whistleblower are those that have something to hide. I say this having blown the whistle on a co-worker who was my direct supervisor and gone through all the ups and downs, including being locked out of my office when I returned to work.

Good on Ron Wyden!
 

Diane B. (275)
Friday November 16, 2012, 1:17 am
thanks for posting
 

John Gregoire (248)
Friday November 16, 2012, 6:38 am
Thanks for the post and as usual Kit hit the pith of the isssue.
 

TomCat S. (285)
Friday November 16, 2012, 8:31 am
Thanks everyone. Kit I guess I did not express myself with sufficient clarity. When I said that they did not "consider" the potential for abuse, I did not mean that they did not know it. I meant that they did not value prevention of abuse highly enough.
 
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