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Herman Wallace of the Angola 3 Tranferred Out Of Solitary Confinement!


US Politics & Gov't  (tags: abuse, americans, congress, constitution, corruption, cover-up, crime, democrats, dishonesty, ethics, freedoms, GoodNews, goodnews, government, Govtfearmongering, healthcare, healthcare, housing, lies, media, news, politics, propaganda, republicans, Supre )

Angola
- 1830 days ago - angola3news.blogspot.com
On Friday, Herman Wallace was transferred out of solitary confinement, when his classification was reduced from maximum to medium security. Herman is now staying at the prison hospital in a 10-bunk dorm. (PHOTO: No more shackles on Herman's legs!)



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Angola T (397)
Thursday July 18, 2013, 12:15 pm
Last month, we were devastated to learn that the Angola 3’s Herman Wallace had been diagnosed with liver cancer, and that he was continuing to be held in isolation in a locked room at Hunt Correctional Center's prison infirmary. Reflecting on his confinement while battling cancer, Herman said: "My own body has now become a tool of torture against me."

On July 10, Amnesty International launched a campaign directed at Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, calling for Herman’s immediate release on humanitarian grounds. "After decades of cruel conditions and a conviction that continues to be challenged by the courts, he should be released immediately to his family so that he can be cared for humanely during his last months," said Amnesty USA campaigner Tessa Murphy.

In recent years, Amnesty has initiated other campaigns challenging the over 41 years spent in solitary confinement by Herman and Albert Woodfox, also of the Angola 3, including the April 17, 2012 delivery of a 67,000 signature petition to LA Governor Jindal demanding Albert and Herman's immediate release from solitary. Earlier this year, Amnesty called on Louisiana Attorney General James Caldwell to not appeal the US District Court’s overturning of Albert’s conviction. More recently, accompanying their call for Herman’s release, Amnesty also expressed concern about “the worsening conditions of confinement” for Albert at David Wade Correctional Center, where he remains in solitary confinement. “For approximately two months, Woodfox has been subjected to additional punitive measures – including strip searches each time he leaves or enters his cell, being escorted in ankle and wrist restraints, restricted phone access, and non-contact visits through a perforated metal screen. Temperatures in the prison cells are reportedly extremely high, regularly reaching up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit,” wrote Amnesty.

Public outrage intensified on Friday, July 12, when a letter citing the Angola 3 case, was sent to the Civil Rights Division of the US Justice Department by Congressman John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich.), Ranking Member of the full U.S. House Judiciary Committee, Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice, Congressman Robert C. “Bobby” Scott (D-Va.), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, and Congressman Cedric Richmond (D-La.). The letter called for an investigation of the Louisiana Departments of Corrections for its “abysmal history of protecting the rights of its prisoners,” of which the “tragic story of the Angola 3 is a case in point.”

About Herman Wallace, the Congressmen wrote: “We have heard that he lost over 50 pounds within 6 months. Despite that dramatic weight loss, and at 72 years old, the prison did nothing to treat or diagnose him until he was sent to an emergency room on June 14. Given the late stage of his diagnosis, his treatment options are now limited. He is frail and ill, but is still being treated as if he is a threat to security, and we hear that he remains under lockdown conditions. This is unconscionable.”

Within hours of the letter’s release, Herman Wallace was transferred out of solitary confinement, when Louisiana’s Hunt prison reduced his classification from maximum to medium security. Herman is now staying at the prison hospital in a 10-bunk dorm, with access to a day room, and does not have to wear leg irons anymore. While celebrating the more human conditions, Herman and the International Coalition to Free the Angola 3 emphasize that the transfer from solitary is not enough. They are asking folks to continue supporting Amnesty International’s call for humane release. The Angola 3’s Robert H. King, himself released in 2001 after 29 years in solitary confinement, says, “The wind is at our back and with your continued help our objective will be realized - freedom is in sight.”
 

Beth M (46)
Thursday July 18, 2013, 1:37 pm
..smiles tearfully...x
 

Julie E (405)
Friday July 19, 2013, 8:26 pm
I just got an email telling me about this. I am happy to hear that he is finally out of solitary confinement. BUT! WE need to keep fighting!
See email to me below:

Dear Julie,

Herman Wallace shouldn't have to die behind bars.

Herman is 71 years old and has advanced liver cancer. He and fellow prisoner Albert Woodfox have been held in solitary confinement longer than anyone else in modern U.S. history. The men have spent the past 41 years of their lives alone in tiny cells for 23 hours a day, deprived of any meaningful human interaction.

No human being deserves to live like this. Herman Wallace should not die alone.
Urge Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal to release Herman Wallace.
Take Action - Help Free Herman Wallace!
 

Why wouldn't Louisiana officials simply release an elderly prisoner with advanced cancer on humanitarian grounds? Evidence suggests that it is in part because Herman dared to organize and speak out against inhumane treatment and racial segregation inside one of United States' most brutal prisons.

Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox are the two imprisoned members of the 'Angola 3', three young black men who were thrown in solitary confinement after working against continued segregation, systematic corruption, and grave abuses in the infamous Angola prison. Originally imprisoned for unrelated cases of armed robbery, Herman and Albert were later convicted for the murder of a prison guard in 1972. However, no physical evidence links either man to the murder.

In the decades since Herman and Albert's conviction, numerous legal concerns have risen to the surface from the racially charged underbelly of the U.S. prison system.

These are just a few glaring flaws we documented in our report ‘100 Years in Solitary: The 'Angola 3' and their Fight for Justice'1:
-DNA evidence that might have established the men's innocence was somehow "lost"
-Outcomes were based on questionable inmate testimony
-Prison officials bribed the main eyewitness
-One witness later retracted his testimony

Prison authorities have broken their own policies to justify Herman's continued incarceration in harsh and inhumane conditions. After decades in these conditions, a highly questionable conviction that continues to be challenged by the courts and the now a tragic prognosis of terminal cancer, the next step seems all too clear: Herman Wallace should be released.

Help begin to correct more than 40 years of injustice right now - call on Louisiana's Governor Bobby Jindal to release Herman Wallace immediately.

In Solidarity,

Jasmine Heiss
Amnesty International USA

P.S. Please join us in reminding the two men that we are standing with them, even if the state of Louisiana tries to keep them in isolation.
Send your letter of support directly to Herman and Albert - show them you care.
 
USA: 100 YEARS IN SOLITARY - THE ‘ANGOLA 3’ AND THEIR FIGHT FOR JUSTICE
 
 

Sheila D (194)
Saturday August 3, 2013, 12:00 am
Noted and thank you.
 
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