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Schizophrenia Linked to Abnormal Brain Waves


Science & Tech  (tags: Brain and cognitive sciences, Neuroscience, Picower Inst. for Learning & Memory, Schizophrenia, Calcineurin, Default mode network )

Judy
- 336 days ago - web.mit.edu
Schizophrenia patients usually suffer from a breakdown of organized thought, often accompanied by delusions or hallucinations. For the first time, MIT neuroscientists have observed the neural activity that appears to produce this disordered thinking.



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Comments

Syd H. (48)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 2:08 am

Sadly schizophrenia (and bi-polar) is often linked to gluten but it is so much a part of our lives we can't comprehend all the damage it causes or not having it in our diets. :(
 

Col N. (24)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 4:57 am
I am gluten intollerent and so is my sister...and depression is relieved when we eliminated gluten and wheat from our diets. My sister also stopped eating dairy products too, and I cannot eat any eggs. Our mum was diagnosed with schizophrenia when I was very young, but I think her problems were more likely diet related as she had weight gain, migraines and depression. In those days they gave barbiturate drugs and electric shock therapy to anyone committed into a mental institution... she was never ever the same after that. They killed her in there.

I wonder at the validity of this research... while it looks like a reasonable experiement, it harms mice and have they looked at the digestive tracts of their poor subjects to see if there is another explanation. I hate research that uses animal experimentation.

I also think that we should look to what we eat to address a whole host of health problems.
 

Kerrie G. (135)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 11:26 am
Noted, thanks.
 

Thomas B. (1)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 12:36 pm
Also associated with tuning in to conservative media gun nuts.
 

Malgorzata Zmuda (182)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 12:44 pm
dzięki za info
 

Joanne Dixon (38)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 5:49 pm
Any "explanation" of achizophrenia which does not take this information into account may be brilliant, but is still going to be flawed:
http://discovermagazine.com/2010/jun/03-the-insanity-virus
 

Patrick Donovan (319)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 7:44 pm
Col, thank you for your insights.
 

Dale O. (190)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 11:37 pm
The mind is a fascinating and still very unknown science, too bad that we don't put as much research into exploring the mind as we do into many other things.
 

june t. (65)
Thursday October 17, 2013, 11:40 pm
I hope they are able to use this new info to create better treatments for this disorder
 

Judy C. (106)
Friday October 18, 2013, 3:34 am
Thanks for the comments, everyone. This disease is tragic, and needs every possible avenue explored. I'm not a fan of animal research, either. Animals often make faulty models for humans. It seems it will continue for some time though. Gluten is the current hot theory to explain numerous health conditions, and may have a role. Anecdotal evidence is plentiful, and more research is warranted, and some is being done.

The virus hypothesis is promising, Joanne. This illness is likely to be triggered by an interaction of factors. There are many things that seem to predispose people to develop schizophrenia, and no one set of factors may be responsible. Triggers such as use of psychedelic drugs.have been associated with the first acute episode of psychosis in some people, for example.

This brain wave research is an interesting piece of the puzzle. It's hard telling whether the role of calcineurin generalizes from mice to humans. It is possible also to mistake a consequence of a disease for a cause.
 

Col N. (24)
Friday October 18, 2013, 3:59 am
Our knowledge of the brain is in its infancy for sure... until we can be sure of what the cause is, we will always assume the latest research to be the magic bullet.

Be kind to people with mental problems, they may well be short on some of our more acceptable social skills or even able to look after themselves adequately, but many of them have great intellect and should not be put on the scrap heap because they don't quite act the way we think they ought.
 

Col N. (24)
Friday October 18, 2013, 4:02 am
PS - my mother once said to me (when she was not on too many barbiturates) that it was hard to be labelled as schizophrenic... suddenly all your friends disappear and you find yourself very much alone)
 

Lindsay Kemp (1)
Friday October 18, 2013, 4:02 am
Noted
 

Aileen P. (33)
Friday October 18, 2013, 5:23 am
Noted.
 

Jav R. (0)
Friday October 18, 2013, 6:34 am
Gracias
 

Roger Garin-michaud (62)
Friday October 18, 2013, 1:39 pm
noted, thanks
 

Birgit W. (144)
Friday October 18, 2013, 3:46 pm
Thanks for the article.
 

Shirley H. (49)
Friday October 18, 2013, 3:52 pm
Wonder how much it cost the Government and us to find that out? And how about all the animals who were probably killed to find out that information? Sorry, I am in a bad mood today.!!
 

Phil P. (91)
Friday October 18, 2013, 4:32 pm
Thanks for the enlightenment.
 

Judy C. (106)
Friday October 18, 2013, 6:31 pm
Thanks everyone. Thank you Col for sharing, and for your call for compassion. We absolutely need to be kind to everyone, and I've done my best to teach that to my children and grandchildren. There are indeed many intelligent and gifted people with mental illness, and they may be avoided or mistreated because they are "different".

Mental illness is culturally constructed, and what makes a person mad in one culture can make one be considered a genius or holy person in another. Our culture is very cruel to those who don't fit within strict norms. I have a close relative who is highly intelligent, very creative as an artist and musician, and also diagnosed schizophrenic. The people with that diagnosis are often medicated into a highly sedated state to suppress their symptoms. Many of them hate the meds, but take them to avoid acute episodes and hospitalization. My relative reluctantly takes hers. The drugs often make them feel that they are losing their creativity. Some opt to avoid meds, and become homeless or incarcerated. I hope we discover a better solution!
 

Winn Adams (192)
Sunday October 20, 2013, 12:12 pm
Noted
 

Sergio Padilla (62)
Thursday October 31, 2013, 1:07 pm
Thanks
 
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