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Choctaw Nation Helped Ireland During 1847 Famine


World  (tags: Choctaw Nation, Ireland, 1847 Irish famine, Trail of Tears, donations, Irish President Mary Robinson )

Dandelion
- 596 days ago - celticclothing.com
Only 16 years after their sad march along the Trail of Tears, the Choctaws learned of people starving to death in Ireland. With great empathy, in 1847 Choctaw individuals made donations totaling $710 the equivalent of more than $5,000 today.



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Comments

Dandelion G. (402)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 12:48 pm
Please read the article inside. I just left below to explain the $710 and the article stating $170. Wanted to let the reader know I hadn't done a misprint, for when they view the article it would of had the different amount.

In 1847, midway through the Great Irish Famine (1845–1849), a group of Native American Choctaws collected $710 (although many articles say the original amount was $170 after a misprint in Angie Debo's The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic) and sent it to help starving Irish men, women and children.

"It had been just 16 years since the Choctaw people had experienced the Trail of Tears, and they had faced starvation... It was an amazing gesture." according to Judy Allen, editor of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's newspaper, Bishinik, based at the Oklahoma Choctaw tribal headquarters in Durant, Oklahoma.

To mark the 150th anniversary, eight Irish people retraced the Trail of Tears, and the donation was publicly commemorated by President Mary Robinson.


 

Dandelion G. (402)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 1:21 pm
I put this article on here as so many have been helping the Lakota to try to purchase, or gain back, their Sacred Lands of Pe Sla. I thought it was nice to see that native americans have also helped other people, this is just one story of many above.

For those who are still interested, here is a recent update on Pe Sla

Anpetu Waste! Wishing you good thoughts and prayers as we await word on outcomes of all the hard work you have all done on behalf of Pe’ Sla! As soon as the Oceti Sakowin, the Great Sioux Nation informs us of the outcome of their private negotiations, we will inform all of you. We keep praying, smudging, hoping for good. We appreciate everyone’s contributions in helping this campaign, this fight for what is sacred – Pe’ Sla. Pilamaye!
Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle

 

Pat B. (351)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 2:30 pm
Another great note of history. Thank you, Sheryl, for this, and for giving us the 'heads up' on Pe' Sla and the donations coming in.
 

Edwin M. (366)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 4:33 pm
Thanks Sheryl
 

Mary away T. (188)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 5:07 pm
Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of these events is that while they commemorate dark chapters of the past, they are focused on the present and future. In other words, they seek to dramatize the need to stop starvation and suffering worldwide. As the plaque on Dublin’s Mansion House which honors the Choctaw contribution reads: “Their humanity calls us to remember the millions of human beings throughout our world today who die of hunger and hunger-related illness in a world of plenty.Thanks Dandelion for sharing this great story, Very interesting and thanks for the update about Sacred Lands of Pe Sla.
 

Jennifer C. (172)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 5:21 pm
Thanks for this article.
 

Dandelion G. (402)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 5:25 pm
Thank you Mary for also pulling out that section of the story. I found this piece extremely moving from start to finish.
 

Thubten Chokyi (830)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 7:48 pm
Thank you Sheryl...noted and shared
 

tasunka m. (334)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 8:42 pm
looks like we are due some good karma.
Thanks Dandelion for the story.
I hope all tribes come together for pe' sla is the wakan for every native and mother nature intuitives.
 

Edith B. (141)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 8:48 pm
Thanks, Sheryl, I never heard this before. I shared it on Facebook.
 

VinnieSick N. (363)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 9:53 pm
My Great-grandfather walked in that "Trail of Tears", and lived out his life on a Reservation.I can't seem to figure out how these Indians were able to make that kind of maney., but am Proud they helped other people dispite their own Trails and Tribulations. Humm?? In fact checking into my Heritage, I might be Choctaw instead of Comanche. Gosh..
 

Nyack Clancy (385)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 9:55 pm
Thanks- noted
 

Sue L. (62)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 10:03 pm
Thanks for sharing Dandelion. I'm 3/4 Irish (6 of 8 great-grandparents were born in Ireland) and as you know, I live in Minnesota, which is acknowledging the sad history of the US-Dakota War of 1862. The goal of the govt of MN at that time was to kill or drive all Native Americans out of MN. Almost all Dakota were relocated to reservations in other states and Canada. Some Dakota did eventually came back to MN-which was their home before white men drove them out.
 

Giana Peranio Paz (367)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 11:10 pm
This is a wonderful and touching story! I had no idea! I get so angry when I read about the plight of the Native American tribes and the terrible actions of the "White Man"! I am really ashamed of my race and would prefer to have been part of one of the tribes. I've read of the Irish poverty and hunger and have been to Ireland. These people really suffered. Thank you for sharing!
 

Maureen C. (3)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 11:11 pm
That's a remarkable piece of history, Dandelion. Thanks for sharing.
 

Patricia E. G. (76)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 1:05 am
Dr. O'Donnell articulated beautifully the passions of the Irish for the Choctaw. Karma is truly alive and living. What goes around comes around.
This article is so very touching and I hope it is a sign of things to come.
When nations oceans apart can feel sympathy for each other.
Thank you friend for sharing.
 

Frans Badenhorst (537)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:03 am
great article, lots of work in it, thanks
 

Arild Warud (151)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:30 am
Thanks for this moving story Sheryl,the Lakota people sure could need some good karma also.
 

Diane B. (275)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:36 am
Thanks Sheryl
 

Georgeta Trandafir (33)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 4:56 am
Thanks for the article.
 

Past Member (0)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 8:12 am
Hvala pročitano.
 

Dandelion G. (402)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 9:43 am
Ajla, said, thanks for read.

You are welcome.
 

Susanne R. (248)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:01 am
What a heartwarming story, Dandelion! Thanks for sharing it. It seems that those who have the least are more likely to share the little they have than those who have the most. Maybe it's because they know what it means to suffer. God bless them!
 

Mariette AWAY (151)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:16 pm
Thanks Sheryl for sharing! Couldn't have said it better Susanne!
 

Fred Krohn (34)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:24 pm
Best wishes to both the Native American Nations and the Irish.
 

Rosie Lopez (73)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:41 pm
thanks for sharing
 

Rosie Lopez (73)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:41 pm
thanks for sharing
 

Leanne B. (21)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 5:14 pm
What a great post Dandelion. Another thing they didn't teach me in school. I shared this one on Face book. Thanks for the post.
 

Morgan McDowell (4)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 6:50 pm
Noted!

What a beautiful story!
 

Sandra M Z. (114)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 7:47 pm
Compassion, it means a lot.

Noted, Thank you Dandelion.

 

Past Member (0)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:08 pm
never knew this cheers
 

Rose NoFWDSPLZ (264)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:16 pm
Amazing I learn't something new wonderful Thanks Dandelion
 

Danuta Watola (1159)
Friday August 31, 2012, 3:06 am
noted
 

Diane K. (136)
Friday August 31, 2012, 8:01 am
Noted. ty
 

Caitlin M. (103)
Friday August 31, 2012, 4:08 pm
There may never be sufficient recognition of the noble hearts which reach out to others while suffering deeply themselves. It is the poor and downtrodden who, after all, know what it's like to be in pain and misery. That is why those of the 1% who were born with "a silver spoon" cannot truly empathize with the common man, no matter how much they may want to or think they do. It is a good reminder, Dandelion. Thanks.
 

Judy C. (106)
Sunday September 2, 2012, 4:00 am
This is such an encouraging story. Humans are capable of great kindness toward others who share similar deprivation and injustice. The news is usually focused on the negative, and it's good to remember and to celebrate the generosity of spirit we are capable of. Thanks for this story Dandelion, and thanks for giving us the links to donate to the Pe' sla fund.
 

Lois Jordan (55)
Sunday September 2, 2012, 8:07 pm
Noted, thanks Dandelion. Many above have said it all for me.
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday September 4, 2012, 4:35 am
noted. thanks Dandelion. living in ireland i was aware of this brilliant example of humanity by native americans but it still fills me with emotion and reminds me that some humans are capable of immense kindness despite their own tribulations.
 

. (0)
Wednesday September 5, 2012, 2:55 pm
Thanks for the update Sheryl. Let's hope....
 

Linda h. (86)
Monday September 10, 2012, 8:39 pm
I always learn some thing new from you Dandelion! Thank you.
 

Carol Dreeszen (368)
Sunday March 17, 2013, 10:01 pm
Thanks Sheryl!! What an inspiring article! Humanity at it's best!
 

Diane B. (275)
Sunday March 17, 2013, 11:08 pm
thanks Sheryl dear
 

Lauren Kozen (166)
Sunday March 17, 2013, 11:58 pm
Interesting article. Thanks for sharing Sheryl.
 

Devon Leonard (54)
Monday March 18, 2013, 1:08 am
It is so important to honor the kindnesses shown in the world....so much emphasis is on the sensational or otherwise sorrowful news............ This is a part of history that we need to recognize and share in our history books. I also am sharing it with friends, thanks Dandelion.....
 

Pat A. (117)
Monday March 18, 2013, 3:21 am
Green stars all over the place - especially to Dandelion - thank you for this, I had no idea! When I was able to get out and about I used to collect for several charities door to door - and it was ALWAYS the poorest who gave most and the richest who clung to their money - even their pennies!

The Choctaw are a true example to us all!
 

Christeen Anderson (419)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:18 am
Thank you so very much for sharing this bit of history with us all.
 

john byrne (48)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:29 am

HiI Dandelion. Good to see you back on line. great posting that has awoken huge memories across time & oceans, its a story of kindness that is only understood by those who walked the walk & continue to do so daily in their fight for natural justice.The Choctaw aide sent to my country is something that has more significance than just aide it spoke volumes of the character of the Nations who then were on the endangered list as Washington abandoned their responsibility to the cultural / religious & spiritual rights of the Nations Im happy to see that greed failed as it is failing now in regards to the FIRST NATIONS on going fight for the lands that was always theirs from the outset may the descendants of the Nations prosper and multiply as a guide to all who fight for their rights.Freedom & Happiness is not a destination its a Human Right. Niki Nana.
 

Darlene W. (297)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:40 am
Bless you and thanks again Dandelion for the work you do.
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (78)
Monday March 18, 2013, 7:37 am
I had known nothing about the solidarity of the Choctaw with the starving Irish, and it is a moving testimony of humanity, from people who certainly had barely enough to get by themselves.

What I did know was that what has come to be known as the Great Famine came about because the potatoe crop failed! Ireland was producing a lot of other food, but it was all exported to England. The failure of the potato crop was a catastrophe because potatoes were about the only thing that kept the Irish from starvation, the only food they produced that they could keep for themselves & eat!
The Great Famine is a myth - it was more accurately 'the Great Starvation' and was an UNnatural disaster!

Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum ( in Connecticut !) & online -
EXPORTS IN FAMINE TIMES:

Throughout the entire period of the Famine, Ireland was exporting enormous quantities of food to England. In Ireland Before and After the Famine, Cormac O’Grada points out, “Although the potato crop failed, the country was still producing and exporting more than enough grain crops to feed the population. But that was a “money crop” and not a “food crop” and could not be interfered with.” Up to 75 percent of Irish soil was devoted to wheat, oats, barley and other crops that were grown for export and shipped abroad while the people starved. Cecil Woodham-Smith, noted scholar and author, wrote in The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845–1849 that “…no issue has provoked so much anger or so embittered relations between the two countries (England and Ireland) as the indisputable fact that huge quantities of food were exported from Ireland to England throughout the period when the people of Ireland were dying of starvation.”

In History Ireland magazine (1997, issue 5, pp. 32-36), Christine Kinealy, a Great Hunger scholar, lecturer, and Drew University professor, relates her findings: Almost 4,000 vessels carried food from Ireland to the ports of Bristol, Glasgow, Liverpool and London during 1847, when 400,000 Irish men, women and children died of starvation and related diseases. The food was shipped under military guard from the most famine-stricken parts of Ireland; Ballina, Ballyshannon, Bantry, Dingle, Killala, Kilrush, Limerick, Sligo, Tralee and Westport. A wide variety of commodities left Ireland during 1847, including peas, beans, onions, rabbits, salmon, oysters, herring, lard, honey, tongues, animal skins, rags, shoes, soap, glue and seed. The most shocking export figures concern butter. Butter was shipped in firkins, each one holding 9 gallons. In the first nine months of 1847, 56,557 firkins were exported from Ireland to Bristol, and 34,852 firkins were shipped to Liverpool. That works out to be 822,681 gallons of butter exported to England from Ireland during nine months of the worst year of the Famine.

http://www.irishholocaust.org/officialbritishintent: Official British IntentWhen the European potato crop failed in 1844 and food prices rose, Britain ordered regiments to Ireland. When blight hit the 1845 English potato crop its food removal regiments were already in Ireland; ready to start. The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was excessive; reckless. Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food. But it didn't grab merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good."6 When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain."7 Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. .../...
The immortal Society of Friends, the "Quakers," did all in their power to save lives. But in 1847 they despaired and quit, upon learning that the Crown planned to perpetuate the genocide's pretext; the British claim of "ownership" of Irish land. Quakers refused to facilitate the genocide by pretending (as Concern does re African genocides) it was an act of nature. In the 1870s; too late; British laws were enacted allowing the Irish to buy back the land of which Britain had robbed them. Twice-yearly payments were extracted from Ireland's farmers until that "debt" was paid off in the 1970s. Ireland's diet, since pre-history, has been meat, dairy products, grains, fruit and vegetables; latterly supplemented by potatoes. Central to its ancient legends are its livestock, reaping hooks, flails,8 querns, and grain-kilns and -mills. The many Connacht grain-kilns and -mills shown on the Irish Ordnance Survey Map of 1837-1841 operated continually prior to, during the Starvation, and subsequent to it until the 1940s when I observed them still working.

Local farmers dried and milled their grain - not potatoes - in them, and this oatmeal and flour were seized and exported by British forces. The "potato famine" Big Lie was underway and already denounced by John Mitchel in his United Irishman in 1847 (he was soon sent in chains to a Tasmanian death camp; but escaped). Fifty years later G.B. Shaw wrote in Man and Superman: "Malone: 'My father died of starvation in Ireland in the Black '47. Maybe you've heard of it?' Violet: 'The Famine?' Malone: (with smoldering passion) 'No, the Starvation. When a country is full of food and exporting it, there can be no Famine."'


Hidden History - Ireland's Holocaust:
".../...Ireland starved because its food, from 40 to 70 shiploads per day, was removed at gunpoint by 12,000 British constables reinforced by the British militia, battleships, excise vessels, Coast Guard and by 200,000 British soldiers (100,000 at any given moment) The attached map shows the never-before-published names and locations in Ireland of the food removal regiments (Disposition of the Army; Public Record Office, London; et al, of which we possess photocopies). Thus, Britain seized from Ireland's producers tens of millions of head of livestock; tens of millions of tons of flour, grains, meat, poultry & dairy products; enough to sustain 18 million persons.

The Public Record Office recently informed us that their British regiments' Daily Activity Reports of 1845-1850 have "gone missing." Those records include each regiment's cattle drives and grain-cart convoys it escorted at gun-point from the Irish districts assigned to it. Also "missing" are the receipts issued by the British army commissariat officers in every Irish port tallying the cattle and tonnage of foodstuff removed; likewise the export lading manifests. Other records provide all-revealing glimpses of the "missing" data; such as: ... From Cork harbor on one day in 1847 2 the AJAX steamed for England with 1,514 firkins of butter, 102 casks of pork, 44 hogsheads of whiskey, 844 sacks of oats, 247 sacks of wheat, 106 bales of bacon, 13 casks of hams, 145 casks of porter, 12 sacks of fodder, 28 bales of feathers, 8 sacks of lard, 296 boxes of eggs, 30 head of cattle, 90 pigs, 220 lambs, 34 calves and 69 miscellaneous packages. On November 14, 1848 3, sailed, from Cork harbor alone: 147 bales of bacon, 120 casks and 135 barrels of pork, 5 casks of hams, 149 casks of miscellaneous provisions (foodstuff); 1,996 sacks & 950 barrels of oats; 300 bags of flour; 300 head of cattle; 239 sheep; 9,398 firkins of butter; 542 boxes of eggs. On July 28, 1848 4; a typical day's food shipments from only the following four ports: from Limerick: the ANN, JOHN GUISE and MESSENGER for London; the PELTON CLINTON for Liverpool; and the CITY OF LIMERICK, BRITISH QUEEN, and CAMBRIAN MAID for Glasgow. This one-day removal of Limerick's food was of 863 firkins of butter; 212 firkins, 1,198 casks and 200 kegs of lard, 87 casks of ham; 267 bales of bacon; 52 barrels of pork; 45 tons and 628 barrels of flour; 4,975 barrels of oats and 1,000 barrels of barley. From Kilrush: the ELLEN for Bristol; the CHARLES G. FRYER and MARY ELLIOTT for London. This one-day removal was of 550 tons of County Clare's oats and 15 tons of its barley. From Tralee: the JOHN ST. BARBE, CLAUDIA and QUEEN for London; the SPOKESMAN for Liverpool. This one-day removal was of 711 tons of Kerry's oats and 118 tons of its barley. From Galway: the MARY, VICTORIA, and DILIGENCE for London; the SWAN and UNION for Limerick (probably for transshipment to England). This one-day removal was of 60 sacks of Co. Galway's flour; 30 sacks and 292 tons of its oatmeal; 294 tons of its oats; and 140 tons of its miscellaneous provisions (foodstuffs). British soldiers forcibly removed it from its starving Limerick, Clare, Kerry and Galway producers.
.../... "
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (78)
Monday March 18, 2013, 7:43 am
I had known nothing about the solidarity of the Choctaw with the starving Irish, and it is a moving testimony of humanity, from people who certainly had barely enough to get by themselves.

What I did know was that what has come to be known as the Great Famine came about because the potatoe crop failed! Ireland was producing a lot of other food, but it was all exported to England. The failure of the potato crop was a catastrophe because potatoes were about the only thing that kept the Irish from starvation, the only food they produced that they could keep for themselves & eat!
The Great Famine is a myth - it was more accurately 'the Great Starvation' and was an UNnatural disaster!

Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum ( in Connecticut !) & online -
EXPORTS IN FAMINE TIMES:

Throughout the entire period of the Famine, Ireland was exporting enormous quantities of food to England. In Ireland Before and After the Famine, Cormac O’Grada points out, “Although the potato crop failed, the country was still producing and exporting more than enough grain crops to feed the population. But that was a “money crop” and not a “food crop” and could not be interfered with.” Up to 75 percent of Irish soil was devoted to wheat, oats, barley and other crops that were grown for export and shipped abroad while the people starved. Cecil Woodham-Smith, noted scholar and author, wrote in The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845–1849 that “…no issue has provoked so much anger or so embittered relations between the two countries (England and Ireland) as the indisputable fact that huge quantities of food were exported from Ireland to England throughout the period when the people of Ireland were dying of starvation.”

In History Ireland magazine (1997, issue 5, pp. 32-36), Christine Kinealy, a Great Hunger scholar, lecturer, and Drew University professor, relates her findings: Almost 4,000 vessels carried food from Ireland to the ports of Bristol, Glasgow, Liverpool and London during 1847, when 400,000 Irish men, women and children died of starvation and related diseases. The food was shipped under military guard from the most famine-stricken parts of Ireland; Ballina, Ballyshannon, Bantry, Dingle, Killala, Kilrush, Limerick, Sligo, Tralee and Westport. A wide variety of commodities left Ireland during 1847, including peas, beans, onions, rabbits, salmon, oysters, herring, lard, honey, tongues, animal skins, rags, shoes, soap, glue and seed. The most shocking export figures concern butter. Butter was shipped in firkins, each one holding 9 gallons. In the first nine months of 1847, 56,557 firkins were exported from Ireland to Bristol, and 34,852 firkins were shipped to Liverpool. That works out to be 822,681 gallons of butter exported to England from Ireland during nine months of the worst year of the Famine.

http://www.irishholocaust.org/officialbritishintent: Official British IntentWhen the European potato crop failed in 1844 and food prices rose, Britain ordered regiments to Ireland. When blight hit the 1845 English potato crop its food removal regiments were already in Ireland; ready to start. The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was excessive; reckless. Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food. But it didn't grab merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good."6 When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain."7 Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. .../...
The immortal Society of Friends, the "Quakers," did all in their power to save lives. But in 1847 they despaired and quit, upon learning that the Crown planned to perpetuate the genocide's pretext; the British claim of "ownership" of Irish land. Quakers refused to facilitate the genocide by pretending (as Concern does re African genocides) it was an act of nature. In the 1870s; too late; British laws were enacted allowing the Irish to buy back the land of which Britain had robbed them. Twice-yearly payments were extracted from Ireland's farmers until that "debt" was paid off in the 1970s. Ireland's diet, since pre-history, has been meat, dairy products, grains, fruit and vegetables; latterly supplemented by potatoes. Central to its ancient legends are its livestock, reaping hooks, flails,8 querns, and grain-kilns and -mills. The many Connacht grain-kilns and -mills shown on the Irish Ordnance Survey Map of 1837-1841 operated continually prior to, during the Starvation, and subsequent to it until the 1940s when I observed them still working.

Local farmers dried and milled their grain - not potatoes - in them, and this oatmeal and flour were seized and exported by British forces. The "potato famine" Big Lie was underway and already denounced by John Mitchel in his United Irishman in 1847 (he was soon sent in chains to a Tasmanian death camp; but escaped). Fifty years later G.B. Shaw wrote in Man and Superman: "Malone: 'My father died of starvation in Ireland in the Black '47. Maybe you've heard of it?' Violet: 'The Famine?' Malone: (with smoldering passion) 'No, the Starvation. When a country is full of food and exporting it, there can be no Famine."'


Hidden History - Ireland's Holocaust:
".../...Ireland starved because its food, from 40 to 70 shiploads per day, was removed at gunpoint by 12,000 British constables reinforced by the British militia, battleships, excise vessels, Coast Guard and by 200,000 British soldiers (100,000 at any given moment) The attached map shows the never-before-published names and locations in Ireland of the food removal regiments (Disposition of the Army; Public Record Office, London; et al, of which we possess photocopies). Thus, Britain seized from Ireland's producers tens of millions of head of livestock; tens of millions of tons of flour, grains, meat, poultry & dairy products; enough to sustain 18 million persons.

The Public Record Office recently informed us that their British regiments' Daily Activity Reports of 1845-1850 have "gone missing." Those records include each regiment's cattle drives and grain-cart convoys it escorted at gun-point from the Irish districts assigned to it. Also "missing" are the receipts issued by the British army commissariat officers in every Irish port tallying the cattle and tonnage of foodstuff removed; likewise the export lading manifests. Other records provide all-revealing glimpses of the "missing" data; such as: ... From Cork harbor on one day in 1847 2 the AJAX steamed for England with 1,514 firkins of butter, 102 casks of pork, 44 hogsheads of whiskey, 844 sacks of oats, 247 sacks of wheat, 106 bales of bacon, 13 casks of hams, 145 casks of porter, 12 sacks of fodder, 28 bales of feathers, 8 sacks of lard, 296 boxes of eggs, 30 head of cattle, 90 pigs, 220 lambs, 34 calves and 69 miscellaneous packages. On November 14, 1848 3, sailed, from Cork harbor alone: 147 bales of bacon, 120 casks and 135 barrels of pork, 5 casks of hams, 149 casks of miscellaneous provisions (foodstuff); 1,996 sacks & 950 barrels of oats; 300 bags of flour; 300 head of cattle; 239 sheep; 9,398 firkins of butter; 542 boxes of eggs. On July 28, 1848 4; a typical day's food shipments from only the following four ports: from Limerick: the ANN, JOHN GUISE and MESSENGER for London; the PELTON CLINTON for Liverpool; and the CITY OF LIMERICK, BRITISH QUEEN, and CAMBRIAN MAID for Glasgow. This one-day removal of Limerick's food was of 863 firkins of butter; 212 firkins, 1,198 casks and 200 kegs of lard, 87 casks of ham; 267 bales of bacon; 52 barrels of pork; 45 tons and 628 barrels of flour; 4,975 barrels of oats and 1,000 barrels of barley. From Kilrush: the ELLEN for Bristol; the CHARLES G. FRYER and MARY ELLIOTT for London. This one-day removal was of 550 tons of County Clare's oats and 15 tons of its barley. From Tralee: the JOHN ST. BARBE, CLAUDIA and QUEEN for London; the SPOKESMAN for Liverpool. This one-day removal was of 711 tons of Kerry's oats and 118 tons of its barley. From Galway: the MARY, VICTORIA, and DILIGENCE for London; the SWAN and UNION for Limerick (probably for transshipment to England). This one-day removal was of 60 sacks of Co. Galway's flour; 30 sacks and 292 tons of its oatmeal; 294 tons of its oats; and 140 tons of its miscellaneous provisions (foodstuffs). British soldiers forcibly removed it from its starving Limerick, Clare, Kerry and Galway producers.
.../... "
 

Gene Jacobson (233)
Monday March 18, 2013, 8:23 am
"Of the 21,000 Choctaws who started the journey, more than half perished from exposure, malnutrition, and disease. This despite the fact that during the War of 1812 the Choctaws had been allies of then General Jackson in his campaign against the British in New Orleans."

Heartbreakingly sad story. Not we we emphasize in our history books, then again our history books haven't much to say about how we came to take this nation from its native peoples. We have much to atone for, all of us, in our own way have history like this somewhere in the dim past. May we all forgive one another and begin to become one world with many beautiful colors and one purpose - to reach a state of enlightenment where such a thing could never happen again. We're not close to that ideal yet, but if we survive as a species, I have faith that we can become a true civilization at some point, too far down the road to see just yet, but perhaps that is just the bend in the road preventing clarity. An inspiring story overall, and worthy of loving remembrance. Thanks, Dandelion. I needed that.
 

Dandelion G. (402)
Monday March 18, 2013, 8:49 am
Thank you Lucy for additional information on here. Yes, indeed, another genocide was inflicted upon a people.

Excerpted from the information you provided.

But it didn't grab merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland.

Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good."

When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain."

The Choctaw understood about genocide, only 16 years prior they walked the Trail of Tears, not much time to have recovered from their own losses but they understood all to well, so reached down deep to extend a large amount of funds to help the Irish at that time. I know many in Ireland have not forgotten this act of kindness and generosity of spirit from the hearts of the Choctaw Nation.

In America many Irish and American Indians mixed and were married. They had a commonality among them in this fact their people both knew of oppression and genocide. Suffering was known to both people, hence my heritage on my Maternal side is my Irish Grandfather married my American Indian Grandmother. It was a sad fact that even in the USA both people were still looked down upon by the overall society. I recall my Mother telling me how she was told by her Mother, "For goodness sake Irene, don't tell them your Indian is bad enough the neighbors know you're Irish."

As societies we must be very careful when a group of people are made the "bad guys" or the victims for too often you will find that Greed is behind the actions. Greed to grab the American Indians land at all cost to them, don't let those people stand in the way of the Greed that was to line some pockets handsomely. Allow the Irish to starve as the Greed was more important in the sale of the foods that were grown in Ireland but not for the starving people who lived in Ireland. Today, we read daily stories of people going with food, life saving medications, housing, all for a few to get extremely rich in a rigged system that allows many to suffer and even perish.

We all have more in common with each other than we do not and we must be careful not to allow the Greedy Ones the Heartless Ones to tear us apart and make enemies out of one another. These wars that pits one common citizen of one Country against another common citizen in another Country to feed the Greed of the few needs to stop.

Learn from the histories of people who have already been down such roads and who are in the midsts of it now. Do not be fooled and tricked. We all must stand together as a people of the world to save one another and our very life upon this planet.

In Solidarity......
 

Dandelion G. (402)
Monday March 18, 2013, 8:56 am
Gene, while I was typing my comment your comment was being installed upon this thread. After I read your own comment I noticed how similar mine was to your own. We said it in different ways, but the end message was the same point to be made. Thank you for leaving your words and as we say Mitakuye Oyasin. We Are All One.....So let us stand as One in our united fight to restore a better way in which for all of us to live upon our Mother and with one another.
 

tasunka m. (334)
Monday March 18, 2013, 9:10 am
Aho, Dandelion
Tell this story EVERY year,that actually was misspelled as tear,I almost left it,as I am in awe of such generosity.
The selfless actions of people who were probably starving at some point of their lives,as well
is the epitome of empathy and altruism.
Thank you, and I will be happy to be reminded of this story year after year,ad infinitum.
lila wopila icicapelo
 

Bryan S. (96)
Monday March 18, 2013, 10:59 am
Thank you, Dandelion, for this inspiring story of empathy and generosity. One thing that came to mind as i read it is that it seems amazing that the Chocktaw looked at these Europeans (the Irish) with such humanity after having such suffering inflicted on them by other Europeans. If only more of that happened today instead of the tendency to lump a whole group of people together as "the bad guys".

And thank you, Lucy. I had read just a little about the starvation in Ireland mislabeled as a famine, but not much detail. The part about the Irish being allowed to buy back their own land reminded me how the Haitians had to pay a huge sum over decades back to the French for their freedom. I think it is important to realize that most everywhere where poor hungry people exist it is because their resources or access to resources has been taken to increase the profits of others.
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (78)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:04 pm
Right you are, Bryan, about the Haitians! They were the first former slaves to fight for freedom from their colonial power & their owners, in their case France, & win their independence, but the French -particularly French slave & land owners in Haiti- demanded reparations for all the future profits lost.

They first demanded 150 million gold francs. Faced with threats of a French blockade, invasion, and isolation, Haiti agreed to pay, borrowing the sum from a French bank. It wasn't until 1947 that Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the world, finished paying-off interest on what is known as its “independence debt.” The original sum had been reduced in 1838 to 90 million gold francs, but that is still about $17 billion.

At the time of the devastating 2010 earthquake, public calls & petitions for France to make amends & to pay Haiti back for this 'extorted' tribute were renewed.The British Guardian and French Liberation dailies ran an open letter to French president Nicolas Sarkozy signed by the likes of US academics Cornel West and Noam Chomsky, EU political figures Daniel Cohn-Bendit and Eva Joly, columnist Naomi Klein, and a host of US and French academics, rappers, and public figures, telling him to give Haiti $17 billion for earthquake reconstruction.

(I got these details from http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2010/0817/France-dismisses-petition-for-it-to-pay-17-billion-in-Haiti-reparations)
...............................................................................................................................................

And, yes, Sheryl, the Irish haven't forgotten the Choctaws' generosity: the facts in the article you posted clearly show it, like the plaque on Dublin’s Mansion House which honors the Choctaw contribution, & reads: “Their humanity calls us to remember the millions of human beings throughout our world today who die of hunger and hunger-related illness in a world of plenty"; the 1990 commemoration of a tragic starvation march that occurred during the Famine in County Mayo with a delegation of Choctaw officials invited to participate; & the 1992 Trail of Tears reenactment by Irish activists, mentioned in your article & explained in more detail here - https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/michael/www/choctaw/retrace.html -

"Nearly 150 years after the Great Potato Famine, a group of Irish people is retracing the "Trail of Tears" from Oklahoma to Mississippi to repay a longstanding debt to the Choctaw Indian tribe.

Eight people from Ireland began the 500-mile trek from Broken Bow, Okla., to Nanih Waiya, Miss. -- roughly retracing, in reverse, the government-forced relocation of the tribe in 1831 from its homeland to what was then Indian Territory wilderness. In Arkansas, they were joined by 17 additional walkers. Two Brazilian Indians will join the final stages of the trek in Mississippi.

The Irish connection: In 1847, midway through the Irish famine, a group of Choctaws collected $710 and sent it to help starving Irish men, women and children.

The donation established a closeness between the Choctaws and the Irish.
It is more than a historical footnote for many Choctaws in Texas.

"Even though we're not directly involved, we're very close to it," said Boyd Tingle of Wimberley, whose ancestors were Choctaw and Irish. His wife, Patricia, is of Irish descent.

Now, the Irish are returning the favor, by publicizing the generosity of the Choctaw and by raising money for yet another famine relief effort -- this one in Somalia, an East African nation racked with anarchy and starvation.

The charity walk is being staged by Action From Ireland, a Dublin-based human rights group that lists among its patrons Archbishop Tutu of South Africa.

"(It's) a unique and historic event ... which links the Choctaw Indians and the Irish people in an extraordinary bond of friendship," said Don Mullan, the group's director. "What makes the Choctaw story of such compelling interest to the Irish is the discovering of their generosity to our people."
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (78)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:15 pm
I forgot to add that Andrew Jackson, first General & then President, is definitely to cross off everybody's list of American heroes! : "President Andrew Jackson seized the fertile lands of the so-called five civilized tribes (Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, and Choctaw) and forced them to undertake a harrowing 500-mile trek to Oklahoma known as the Trail of Tears. .../... This despite the fact that during the War of 1812 the Choctaws had been allies of then General Jackson in his campaign against the British in New Orleans."
 

Joan De Chirico (26)
Monday March 18, 2013, 4:22 pm
Remarkable generosity and offering.
 

Nancy C. (790)
Tuesday March 19, 2013, 2:39 pm
I too have both Irish and American Indian heritage. Thank you for the reminder of this bond Sheryl...
 

lee e. (114)
Tuesday March 19, 2013, 3:12 pm
I have no Irish in my heritage, and only those who are against - but even though I don't celebrate this day in my heritage - I do celebrate it as the day my father died --- oh well - any excuse to raise a cup? that said I did appreciate your article that brings about all of us as a "nation" - which my dear departed father would never have done:)
 

Shaheen N. (58)
Tuesday September 3, 2013, 9:01 pm
Thanks Sheryl, for an interesting Article.
 
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