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Honoring Elouise Cobell, Yellow Bird Woman, A Great Leader


Society & Culture  (tags: Elouise Cobell, Yellow Bird Woman, American Indian, Blackfeet Nation, leader, Indian Trust Funds, United States Government, Cobell v. Salazar, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Found )

Dandelion
- 1053 days ago - nytimes.com
Like many great American Indian leaders in history, she has earned fame for a basic reason. She put herself last as she pursued justice first on behalf of other people. If you are a woman of substance, you speak your mind unafraid of the consequences.



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Comments

Dandelion G. (383)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 4:02 pm
This is just a brief....I hope you will all read the actual article of this remarkable woman.

I would like to Honor a woman who took her journey to the Spirit World one year ago, on October 16th, many knew of her, but still far more do not know of her. I have placed a news article on about her, for she was one remarkable woman that a few more should know of.

Elouise Cobell, also known as, Yellow Bird Woman, a Blackfeet tribal member who led the 15 year battle in one of the largest and most complicated class-action lawsuits ever brought against the United States. A class-action lawsuit on behalf of 300,000 Indians against the Interior Department that yielded one of history’s largest government settlements — a payout worth $3.4 billion.

She also assured that $60 million of the class action settlement she led be set aside for Native students to attend college and vocational school, bringing hope through education to American Indian people.”

One time Elouise Cobell told a University of Montana audience about the early years of filing what is commonly known as the Cobell lawsuit. She said, “I remember driving home that night and saying, “God, why did you do this? You shouldn’t have sued them.”

But on her way home, she looked to the west towards Ghost Ridge on the Blackfeet Reservation where five hundred Blackfeet starved to death after the government hoarded their food rations. Elouise said: “That’s why I was doing it. I wanted to make a change. I wanted to change the way the government treated individual Indians.”

And she fought for people like Grandma Sally who lived in Oklahoma. She was a poor woman — a poor woman who owned an oil well — yet workers in the Bureau of Indian Affairs told her she owned a non-producing well — even though trucks designed to carry oil continually arrived at night on her land. Sally’s family asked the BIA for all the records related to her land dating from 1935 to 1992. All their requests were denied even after they used the Freedom of Information Act.

 

Dandelion G. (383)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 4:03 pm
This is just a brief....I hope you will all read the actual article of this remarkable woman.

I would like to Honor a woman who took her journey to the Spirit World one year ago, on October 16th, many knew of her, but still far more do not know of her. I have placed a news article on about her, for she was one remarkable woman that a few more should know of.

Elouise Cobell, also known as, Yellow Bird Woman, a Blackfeet tribal member who led the 15 year battle in one of the largest and most complicated class-action lawsuits ever brought against the United States. A class-action lawsuit on behalf of 300,000 Indians against the Interior Department that yielded one of history’s largest government settlements — a payout worth $3.4 billion.

She also assured that $60 million of the class action settlement she led be set aside for Native students to attend college and vocational school, bringing hope through education to American Indian people.”

One time Elouise Cobell told a University of Montana audience about the early years of filing what is commonly known as the Cobell lawsuit. She said, “I remember driving home that night and saying, “God, why did you do this? You shouldn’t have sued them.”

But on her way home, she looked to the west towards Ghost Ridge on the Blackfeet Reservation where five hundred Blackfeet starved to death after the government hoarded their food rations. Elouise said: “That’s why I was doing it. I wanted to make a change. I wanted to change the way the government treated individual Indians.”

And she fought for people like Grandma Sally who lived in Oklahoma. She was a poor woman — a poor woman who owned an oil well — yet workers in the Bureau of Indian Affairs told her she owned a non-producing well — even though trucks designed to carry oil continually arrived at night on her land. Sally’s family asked the BIA for all the records related to her land dating from 1935 to 1992. All their requests were denied even after they used the Freedom of Information Act.
 

Carrie B. (316)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 4:11 pm
Thank you Sheryl. Excellent post!
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 5:26 pm
For those interested....I posted a story on last year, Why do we still keep celebrating a Mass Murderer? For those who want to find out who that is and really learn about him, the link is below. Let us move forward and rid ourselves of this from our calendars, what message do we send to the rest of the world that seem to understand this better than we do.
True Legacy Cruelty and Slavery
 

Pat B. (355)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:04 pm
Makes me want to cry at the injustices to the Indian Nations. I have saved this, and am also sending on to friends at school. Thank you for this GREAT and Historical link. xox
 

Pat B. (355)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:06 pm
GLADLY signed petition.!!!!
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:19 pm
You cannot currently send a star to Gran because you have done so within the last week.
For those not linked to me, I sent out two stories, one for Lakota children which has a petition with it. If you would also like to sign a Petition to help save these children from being removed from their families and their Nation go to the following link.
Petition to Bureau of Indian Affairs for Lakota
 

Julian Robert Gonzalez (112)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:20 pm
Both happy and sad. Yes I sign and note. Happy do do so.
Sad because this is still going on and that we even need a petition because of Government crimes.
 

Kit B. (276)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:27 pm

I remember reading this before, I guess it was from you. This is an inspiring story, not just because she was a woman, or Native American, she dared to tread where few would. She fought for justice, for that we owe her a debt. Thanks Dandelion.
 

Mary T. (185)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 6:41 pm
Thanks Dandelion for the very interesting article, I have signed and shared the petition.
 

Patrick Donovan (331)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 7:07 pm
She is a hero to all for her willingness to fight for what was right and never giving in.
 

Christeen Anderson (650)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 7:15 pm
Thanks so much for this article. I am still learning about past history and I am very interested.
 

Nancy C. (814)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 7:37 pm
Living for the greater good. Eloise Cobell, Yellow Bird Woman is an American Indian Heroine. The lives of many in her family will be changed and aided for the future. She has brought a bit of justice to her people. I admire her courage and perseverance. Thank you Dandelion.
 

Past Member (0)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 9:27 pm
Thanks.
 

Susanne R. (249)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 10:08 pm
What a remarkable woman! Thanks for sharing this article, Dandelion!
 

Ana Marija Rumbak (200)
Sunday October 7, 2012, 10:35 pm
noted with thanks...
 

Past Member (0)
Monday October 8, 2012, 1:58 am
It is hard to fight for justice and truth .
She is an example for all the people how they should behave.
I admire for her strength, courage and especially her perseverance .
What a extraordinary women who inspire and empower others to make
a difference in their communities and the world.
 

Arild Warud (173)
Monday October 8, 2012, 3:02 am
A remarkable woman,thanks for posting Sheryl.
 

Joe R. (190)
Monday October 8, 2012, 3:06 am
What an amazing woman! Thanks Dandelion.
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Monday October 8, 2012, 5:57 am
She truly is a courages and remarkable woman. I'm so tired of the Sarah Palin's getting the attention in this the United States, I want others to know, that women of substance also Walk upon this land. Thank you all for taking the time to learn of this woman of her contributions.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday October 8, 2012, 8:58 am
What our nation desperately needs is more women to find the greatness within them and to lead us to a green, sustainable future. There are many gentle, sensitive, good-hearted men in this world, but they aren't the men running our planet into the grave. We need women in office...and corporations out!
 

divergent revolution (331)
Monday October 8, 2012, 9:24 am
Brian you are wise beyond all our years put together.
I wish I had your political passion...My answer was to leave for a decade and enjoy what is left of nature.
You will accomplish great things with such a tolerant and progressive attitude.
we need more men like you.
 

john byrne (53)
Monday October 8, 2012, 11:22 am

What a woman! guided by truth & wisdom the truth & wisdom they dont want passed on to the young.She would be a credit to any nation as she was to her own.
surely grass will grow where they lay her bones
but oh to be where her spirit roams.
 

Liliana D. (124)
Monday October 8, 2012, 12:47 pm
Remarkable woman! Thank you Dandelion for posting her story.
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Monday October 8, 2012, 2:07 pm
It seems we have a few men on this thread that does my heart well. I'm also blessed to know many wonderful women on and off C2.
 

David Menard (43)
Monday October 8, 2012, 2:12 pm
Much respect We are our deeds. We would do well to follow her example
 

Petra M. (262)
Monday October 8, 2012, 3:31 pm
Thanks Dandelion for the very interesting article!!!
 

Lois Jordan (60)
Monday October 8, 2012, 3:41 pm
Noted & much thanks for posting, Dandelion. It always does wonders for my soul to learn of a woman like this.
 

Rose Becke (293)
Monday October 8, 2012, 4:39 pm
Great post Dandelion Thank you
 

Angelika R. (145)
Monday October 8, 2012, 5:52 pm
Democratic U.S. Senator Jon Tester offered the following statement after her passing:
“Elouise Cobell was a star—truly a guiding light that will always lead the way for all Americans who fight for justice and fairness. Elouise’s tireless leadership set this nation on a new course, and what she accomplished reminds us that any person in any part of this country has the power to stand up and right a wrong, no matter how difficult it may be… Future generations will learn about Elouise Cobell’s legacy and they will be inspired to follow her lead. She will always be remembered as an American hero.”
Now, who wouldn't agree with this!
Disappointing however, that she has not received that Congressional Medal of Honor during her lifetime.
The legislation introduced for this award has yet to be ratified if I understand that right.
Thank you Sheryl for shining a light on this hero.
 

Dandelion G. (383)
Monday October 8, 2012, 6:57 pm
Thank you for taking the time to learn of her and for sharing this on the thread.
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday October 9, 2012, 12:57 am
A person of greatness. Thank you for the article and the inspiration.
 

SuSanne P. (190)
Tuesday October 9, 2012, 2:53 pm
Thank you dearly for "introducing me" to a woman of great substance. Such a Kind Hear ted Soul doing the right thing for the right reasons!
 

Judy C. (99)
Tuesday October 9, 2012, 9:47 pm
Thank you for posting and informing us about Louise Cobell. I followed her struggle in the case during its last few years, and it seemed it would never end. I love the part of the story that says:

"One time Elouise Cobell told a University of Montana audience about the early years of filing what is commonly known as the Cobell lawsuit. She said, “I remember driving home that night and saying, “God, why did you do this? You shouldn’t have sued them.”

But on her way home, she looked to the west towards Ghost Ridge on the Blackfeet Reservation where five hundred Blackfeet starved to death after the government hoarded their food rations. Elouise said: “That’s why I was doing it. I wanted to make a change. I wanted to change the way the government treated individual Indians.”

She entered into the struggle knowing the enormity of what she was up against, but she did not waver.
 

Phillipa W. (199)
Wednesday October 10, 2012, 3:40 am
thanks.
 

. (0)
Wednesday October 10, 2012, 11:03 am
Some people actually DO stand up..ty Sheryl for the excellent post
 
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