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Disabled Passengers Struggle With Subway


Society & Culture  (tags: handicapped, disabled, wheelchairs, subway, public transit, accessibility, rights, americans, arts, transportation )

Lisa
- 2732 days ago - newsweek.com
Handicapped passengers struggle with big-city transit systems; some sue for improvements For handicapped New Yorkers, a trip aboard the city's subway system means confronting a series of obstacles _ and indignities.



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Comments

Blue Bunting (855)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 4:25 pm
This is shameful!

People with disabilities deserve to be included in our society!
 

Catman P. (957)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 4:43 pm
Thanks for raising awareness of this important issue Lisa.
 

FreeSpirit Running (324)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 4:54 pm
Your a sweetie Lisa, thank you very much for this article, noted...and everyone on Earth has rights, dis-abled or not...we are all one.."Mitakuye Oyasin".....many blessings to all...
FreeSpiritRunning..
 

Cheryl Benson (375)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 5:09 pm
being one of them I can;t even use wheeltrans, let alone a subway. Hope for the future, or the lotto and a driver and my own equipped van, YES
 

Cheryl Benson (375)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 5:13 pm
add the streets, corners, heavy doors to that, they upgrade or renovate a building/business and not the door or wheelchair accessable, I've seen some actually take the power button off the door to open it for you. also the buildings we have to live in until we get wheelchair accessaable housing, let alone supportive care to go with it. yes the 'normals' create alot of barriers. as one said not long back, why should he have to change for a minority, this isn't a vote in the house of commons on who is leader or not IT'S HUMAN RIGHTS, LIVING, QUALITY OFLIFE, safety, dignety, VALUE.
 

Blue Bunting (855)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 5:20 pm
Sunshine wrote:

" . . . bein gone of them . . . "

Darling, Sunshine, we are all "one of them" ... we are all intricately connected ... and those who are in DENIAL suffer most...
 

Blue Bunting (855)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 5:23 pm
Travelling in NYC as a "person with a disabilty" is very challenging ..

NYC can become the premier site offering services for people with disabilities ...

we just have to make it more profitable for people like Mike Bloomberg

 

Cynthia H. (155)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 5:43 pm
In the Portland, Oregon metro area all of the buses, lightrail trains and street cars are accessible to the disabled - as are all stops and stations. Tri-Met, the public transportation system, has a pass, called the Honored Citizens pass, available at a very reasonable cost to those who qualify for an HC ID card. And certain sections of each bus, train, etc. are set aside for the disabled. There is also the Lift service, which provides vans for shared rides and can be used to get to places that are not accessible by other means of public transportation.

One thing that wasn't acknowledge in this article was the existence of those with non-visible disabilities - people who are not in wheelchairs, etc. but are never the less confronted with the need to deal with all of the challenges that exist in living their daily lives and in maintaining mobility....
 

Jaclin S. (230)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 7:18 pm
Even here in NZ we have accommodated the disabled in everyway possible - it is a shameful thing to read that the disabled are still having major difficulties in some countries with getting to and from in a seemly manner that does not cause distress to them. Thanx Lisa for this post - everyone should be made aware of this.
 

RC deWinter (418)
Wednesday October 31, 2007, 7:28 pm
I am very proud to have been a trustee of the library in the town where I lived for 12 years during our building expansion. We raised hundreds of thiusands of dollars to make our library handicapped-accessible...this is a MUCH-NEEDED improvement all across the country!
 

Lisa Swift (79)
Thursday November 1, 2007, 2:51 am
Whoever: Are you talking about the "Invisibly Disabled"--those whose disabilities may be such that they don't show to the world under ordinary circumstances? For instance, those with heart conditions or those with MS on a good day? If you are, there is a movement toward universal design in all public facilities, as well as programs like those at the MS Foundation, whereby you can get a grant to retrofit your vehicle or home with adaptive devices and infrastructure with which to make life a bit easier for everyone. Also, besides other disease-related organizations, there remains the disability proceas through state or federal agencies. All you need is a doctor with enough savvy to word the application in a way which will qualify you for disabled statu, and then a world of aids to adapt the environment opens up. For years, I had this unknown disability which was eating away at my mobility and causing chronic pain, but I looked just fine and wasn't even diagnosed with a degenerative disease: that's MS. I still have good days, where I don't need my power chair, but they are few and far between now. I still have times where I get the comment: "But you don't look sick!"

Jaclin: Wherwe we haVve our problems is with older infrastructure, which hasn't been adapted yet. In our ADA, there is a proviso that if accomodation for the disabled is too expensive, then they don't have to change their infrastructure. But the disabled have gotten more of a voice here, by banding together, and are forcing the infrastructure to be changed a bit at a time, because if you have a large number of people requesting a certain change, they can divide the cost among them, and force an agency or business to make the changes. In some cases, they can get grants to provide the funding for the adaptations. Places which have been built since the ADA was passed are required to be built with access for all. (ADA = Americans with Disabilities Act)
 

Lisa Swift (79)
Thursday November 1, 2007, 2:51 am
Whoever: Are you talking about the "Invisibly Disabled"--those whose disabilities may be such that they don't show to the world under ordinary circumstances? For instance, those with heart conditions or those with MS on a good day? If you are, there is a movement toward universal design in all public facilities, as well as programs like those at the MS Foundation, whereby you can get a grant to retrofit your vehicle or home with adaptive devices and infrastructure with which to make life a bit easier for everyone. Also, besides other disease-related organizations, there remains the disability proceas through state or federal agencies. All you need is a doctor with enough savvy to word the application in a way which will qualify you for disabled statu, and then a world of aids to adapt the environment opens up. For years, I had this unknown disability which was eating away at my mobility and causing chronic pain, but I looked just fine and wasn't even diagnosed with a degenerative disease: that's MS. I still have good days, where I don't need my power chair, but they are few and far between now. I still have times where I get the comment: "But you don't look sick!"

Jaclin: Wherwe we haVve our problems is with older infrastructure, which hasn't been adapted yet. In our ADA, there is a proviso that if accomodation for the disabled is too expensive, then they don't have to change their infrastructure. But the disabled have gotten more of a voice here, by banding together, and are forcing the infrastructure to be changed a bit at a time, because if you have a large number of people requesting a certain change, they can divide the cost among them, and force an agency or business to make the changes. In some cases, they can get grants to provide the funding for the adaptations. Places which have been built since the ADA was passed are required to be built with access for all. (ADA = Americans with Disabilities Act)
 

Cheryl Benson (375)
Thursday November 1, 2007, 8:56 am
YOU GET LESS OR FOR SOME CHRONIC ILLNESSES NOTHING THAT ARE INVISABLE AND TAKE EONS, EVEN ONES NOT LIKE PARKINSONS TO GET RECOGNIZED AS NOT PSHYCIATRIC TOOK CENTURYS, MS WAS CALLED HYSTERIA FOR AGES BECAUSE MOSTLY WOMEN GOT IT JUST LIKE ME (CFIDS), LET ALONE FUNDING FOR ANYTHING. I ACUTALY CHRONICALLY ILL WITH ME/FM/MCS AND A HOST OF OTHERS THAT CAME WITH THOSE SINCE 1991, TOTALLY HAD TO STOP WORK IN 1994 AND DISCRIMINATED AGAINST VERY BADY AND EVEN HARMED DISABLED BY MEDICATIONS FROM DOCTORS SAYING THEY WERE PHSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS. WHICH M.E. IS NEUROLOGICAL, NOW. BUT I DAMAGE FOR LIFE. MY POWERWHEEL CHAIR THEY PUT THROU ON MY M.E., WHICH I DIDN'T KNOW TO COVER FOR THE BRAIN BODY DAMAGE, I WONDERED WHY IT HAD TO BE APPEALED, SOME OF WHICH IS NOT THAT NOTICABLE UNLESSS YOU ARE AROUND FOR A FEW HOURS OR A DAY, IF I GET MY MUCLES LIGAMENTS MORE RELAXED INSTEAD OF STIFF AND VERY WEAK, THEN I CAN PICK UP MORE THAN A PLASTIC GLASS OF WATER 9NOT MUCH MORE BUT BIG DIFFERENCE FOR ME) WALK IN APT, THE MORE RELAXED THEY ARE THE FURTHER I CAN WALK, I'VE MADE IT DOWN BY THE ELEVATOR TO THE SUPERINTENTDENTS, ONLY WHAT 2 TIMES, AND WAS REALLY STUPID BECAUSE MY DYSTONIA COULD HAVE GONE OFF AND BEEN ON THE FLOOR CONVULSING. I'VE BEEN LEFT WITH NO TREATMENT AND NONE OF IT ON MY RECORDS. THE DISCRIMINATION IS RAMPANT REGARDING THOSE CHRONICALLY ILL, AND STILL WITH THE DISABLED YOU CAN SEE AS WELL.

THIS ARTICLE IS WHY I MANAGED TO SEND U A STAR. I BACKED UP ON PEOPLE I OWE STARS TO AND THANK YOUS.

AND BB. NOT GOING THERE, WITH YOU HERE, IT WILL GO OFF TOPIC.
TYPING CAPS SO CAN SEE RIGHT NOW, EYESIGHT FLUCUATES, AND I HAVE TO GET OFF HERE, CARE2. i am wWASTING MY TYPING TIME, THAT I CAN, OFTEN I CAN'T OR IT IS VERY POOR.
 

Cynthia H. (155)
Thursday November 1, 2007, 9:36 am
Lisa, non-visible disabilities can be anything from a chronic illness to a structural/physical disability that is not immediately apparent - such as spinal disintegration. So, yes, disabilities that are not immediately apparent.

There is a tendency, even among those who work with the disabled, to think in terms of obvious disabilities. I have witnessed it at work, within several organizations, and in public. Even the forums, workshops, etc. that I've attended focused on the disabled/disabilities have tended to overlook or ignore the subject of non-visible disabilities.

I have an honored citizens ID which I use on our public transportation system. Carrying that allows me to request seating in specially marked areas of buses, trains, etc. if that seating is taken by someone who is neither elderly nor disabled. For the most part, people are gracious about it, but there have been times when people have made rude remarks - such as one gentleman who said that he wanted the name of my "forger" so that he could have an HC pass too.

You mentioned that people tell you "But you don't look sick!" It's a comment I hear all the time - even from my extended family. I think they all took a vote in my absence and decided that my physical disabilities are all in my mind, and that I do not have a chronic illness - I'm simply "lazy". I don't waste time or energy attempting to convince them otherwise...it would be self-defeating.

There are no programs that I know of for people with my combination of disabilities - no grants, etc. I do, however, work with Vocational Rehabilitation because I would like to continue working and being an active participant in society. Voc Rehab is the reason I have my computer and am attending classes at the local college.

Having worked for Aging & Disability Services, I am too aware of what attempting to live on Social Security Disability can mean....My personal choice, for as long as I am blessed enough to have a choice, is to avoid SSD.
 
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