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Iceland Allows Whale Hunting This Year, Defying the International Ban.


Animals  (tags: Iceland, whale hunting, petition )

Trudi
- 2273 days ago - thepetitionsite.com
Iceland Must Reverse Whale Hunt Decision. As global warming threatens more and more whales, it is even more critical to stop the whale hunt. Urge Iceland's Minister of Fisheries to revoke the hunting permission today . PETITION TO SIGN



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Comments

(4)
Monday June 2, 2008, 4:52 am
Noted & Signed with pleasure. What is wrong with them? Crazy to change back. Thanks Trudi.
 

Pam F. (234)
Monday June 2, 2008, 4:55 am
Thank you,Trudi - signed and commented.
 

Hans L. (958)
Monday June 2, 2008, 4:58 am
Thank you Trudi noted and signed!
 

Elle J. (279)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:01 am
Noted, signed with strong comments and got two more petitions in the process. Thanks Trudi
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:02 am
Thanks Trudi for the e mail this morning..signed and noted.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:02 am
Signed n& noted...............

The things that will destroy us are:
politics without principle;
pleasure without conscience;
wealth without work;
knowledge without character;
business without morality;
science without humanity;
and worship without sacrifice.

PLANT TREES FOR LIFE.......
 

Kathy Chadwell (371)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:12 am
since bush broke interNational laws, seem all these governments think there are no more laws to honor. Thank you Trudi
Noted and just signed this one yesterday.
You already signed this petition at 11:06 pm PDT, Jun 1, 2008.
 

Maryanne C. (111)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:13 am
Signed and noted,thank you Trudi.
 

. (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:17 am
signed offcourse
 

Joycey B. (750)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:32 am
Signed earlier this morning. Noted with thanks Trudi.

Thank you!
You already signed this petition at 3:27 am PDT, Jun 2, 2008.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:42 am
all signed
thank you, Trudi
 

Hans L. (958)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:47 am
What is the greater threat?
Global warming?
Commercial whaling?
Garbage?
Global warming is real but i dont see how that should kill many whales..
They will find enough food but its poisened...
I think that the garbage does more damage!
Commercial whaling is back again and will kill thousands of whales!
Japan will lead the nations that want commercial whaling and will have many supporters including the USA!
 

. (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 5:57 am
Noted with horror that once again a country refuses to acknowledge and accept the law. Governments continue to torture and murder these magnificent whales to the detriment of the entire earth!
Petition signed for these innocent whales.
 

Carl Nielsen (7)
Monday June 2, 2008, 6:08 am
Anybody got a reference to Iceland allowing hunting Fin Whales - and in unlimited numbers ? Sounds wierd given that Fin Whales are endangered - and why would they then limit the number of Minke Whales, which isn't ?

BTW.

Threat number one to wildlife: Habitat destruction
Threat number two: Invasive species

or did you mean just to whales ?
 

Annie J. (205)
Monday June 2, 2008, 6:09 am
Signed, thanks Trudi
 

Trudi Reijnders (242)
Monday June 2, 2008, 6:23 am

Please send a protest email to the Icelandic authorities requesting that they stop the hunt immediately:
http://www.wdcs.org/view_e_protest.php?e_protest_select=14&&select=48
 

Cristina S. (338)
Monday June 2, 2008, 7:16 am
Thank you. Signed and crossposted.
 

Gorilly Girl (339)
Monday June 2, 2008, 7:25 am
Thank you!
You already signed this petition at 7:22 am PDT, Jun 2, 2008.
 

Jim Phillips (3208)
Monday June 2, 2008, 7:30 am
Petition signed and passed on.

TY, Trudi.
 

FreeSpirit Running (324)
Monday June 2, 2008, 7:53 am
Thanks for caring my friend Trudi, this is noted & signed. I will also email the Icelandic authorities with the site that you have kindly provided.
Many blessings to all...
FreeSpirit...
 

Portia Flavius (28)
Monday June 2, 2008, 8:46 am
Signed and noted - thank you for bringing this to our attention.
 

Brenda H. (29)
Monday June 2, 2008, 8:57 am
THANKS MY FRIEND--SIGNED & COMMENTED!
 

Linda Teachenor (36)
Monday June 2, 2008, 9:07 am
Trudi, thank you for bringing this to my attention. Noted & Signed with hope and prayers that it will open the eyes of those in charge.
 

. (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 10:25 am
Freaks!!! They just got to keep on killing don't they? One day when they are no more whales then what? Maybe they will turn on each other. No they will want to come to another part of the ocean and do it. I have signed Thanks Trudi
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 10:50 am
Why do they do this Iceland needs the Eco tourism profit more than the whales
on their plate! I dont think that they can have both!
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 11:39 am
Noted and signed
 

LL A. (33)
Monday June 2, 2008, 12:55 pm
Noted and signed! #1160
 

Jillyanne Michelle Cape (718)
Monday June 2, 2008, 1:29 pm
How truly disappointed I am in Iceland. Noted and signed, sadly.
 

Darlene K. (367)
Monday June 2, 2008, 2:19 pm
Noted and petition signed, thank you.
 

Donna Smith (43)
Monday June 2, 2008, 2:27 pm
noted and signed thanks Trudi
 

Trudi Reijnders (242)
Monday June 2, 2008, 2:36 pm
Today june 2 :
Reykjavik/Stockholm - Iceland and Norway have exported their first shipment of whale meat to Japan, reports said Monday.

'This trade will be mutually beneficial for the three main whaling countries. It will serve to strengthen our relations,' Kristjan Loftsson, managing director of Icelandic whaling company Hvalur, was quoted as telling online site High North News.

Iceland's government in May set a commercial quota of 40 minke whales, while Norway has a quota of 1,052 minke whales for the ongoing whaling season.

Published reports in Iceland suggested the shipment to Japan totalled 60 tons of fin whale meat caught in 2006, and an undisclosed amount of minke whale meat caught by Norwegian whalers.

Iceland angered conservationists in 2006 when the government said it would resume commercial whaling and set a quota of nine fin whales and 30 minke whales, of which six fin whales were caught.

The decision was criticized by conservation groups and several governments, who fear that the move threatens a two-decade long moratorium on whale hunting.

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS) issued a statement Monday saying the exports were an 'outrage' and came on the eve of a new meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC).

'This is an outrage and shows just how naive it is to trust the whaling nations,' Sue Fisher of WDCS International said.

Loftsson defended the decision to cull whales, citing large stocks of minke whales.

'This trade is perfectly legal under the domestic legislation of the three countries as well as all relevant international law,' Loftsson added.

Japan has conducted scientific whale hunting under provisions offered by the IWC while Norway resumed whaling of minke whales, the smallest of the seven great whales, in 1993.

The fin whale is the second largest of the seven great whales. They are up to 24 metres long, and can weigh between 45 and 64 tons. The World Conservation Union (IUCN) has listed the fin whales on its red list of threatened species.
 

Sye M. (45)
Monday June 2, 2008, 3:23 pm
I'm so disappointed! Signed & noted!
 

Past Member (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 3:54 pm
All this whale mudering makes me want to barf & cry at the same time!!

Dam those savages!!!!!!!!!!!!


"Sooner or later,
we sit down to a
banquet of consequences."
-Robert Louis Stevenson

PLANT TREES FOR LIFE........
 

. (0)
Monday June 2, 2008, 6:19 pm
Thank you trudi i love all animals
 

Bronwyn H. (228)
Monday June 2, 2008, 8:48 pm
Noted and signed.Shame on them.
 

Scott Cooper (35)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 12:04 am
Truly we need to evolve beyond killing to obtain sustenance...plants and Fungi excluded...Cetaceans have a lot to teach us once we bridge the sense of "Otherness" and begin to study their brain functions...because I've heard of incidents of Cetaceans conveying a great sense of presence when face to face with humans...it's in those huge dark eyes...and their tendency to work as a hunting "Team"...clearly a Social behavior.
 

Hans L. (958)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 4:15 am
Since nobody has posted the answer from Iceland lets see how they see it:
Thank you for your interest in Iceland?s policy on whaling.

As you may know Iceland is a consistent advocate of the principle of
sustainable use of natural resources. This is reflected in Iceland?s
whaling activities, which have never involved any of the endangered whale
species, killed on a large scale by other whaling nations in the past.

Several countries catch whales, most of them on a much bigger scale
than Iceland. The biggest whaling countries among the members of the
International Whaling Commission (IWC) are the United States, Russia,
Norway, Japan and Greenland. The whaling operations practiced by all those
countries, as well as Iceland, are sustainable and legal and in accordance
with the rules of the IWC.

Iceland fully appreciates the need for careful conservation of marine
resources. Our economy depends on those resources. Iceland was among the
first countries in the world to extend its fishery limits to 200 nautical
miles in the year 1975, in order to put an end to the uncontrolled fishing
around Iceland by trawlers from other countries.

Iceland was also one of the first countries in the world to take a
conservationist approach to whaling. As signs of overexploitation of whales
by other nations emerged early in the last century, Iceland declared a ban
on whaling for large whales around Iceland in 1915. Whaling was not resumed
until 1948, except for limited catches 1935-1939. Strict rules and
limitations were applied to whaling in Iceland from 1948 to 1985 when
commercial whaling was halted again following a decision by the IWC.

Iceland believes that the whaling issue should not be handled as an
exception from the principle of sustainable use of natural resources. A
research plan on common minke whales was implemented 2003 ? 2007 involving
the take of a total 200 animals in order to gain better understanding of
the role of common minke whales in the ecosystem. Important material was
collected, which is now studied by scientists in order to increase our
knowledge on the position of common minke whales in the food chain and how
they prey on other species in their habitat affecting their abundance.

Commercial whaling was resumed in 2006 with 7 fin whales and one
common minke whale caught commercially in that year, in addition to 60
common minke whales caught in accordance with the research plan. The
following year a total of 44 common minke whales were caught in Iceland,
including catches from both commercial whaling operations and the
conclusion of the scientific whaling program. A commercial quota of 40
common minke whales is set for the year 2008. The scientific program is no
longer operated. No quota for fin whales has been issued this year.

The abundance of both common minke whales and fin whales has been
confirmed by the Scientific Committies of the International Whaling
Commission (IWC) and the North-Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission (NAMMCO),
as as can been seen from their websites www.iwcoffice.org and www.nammco.no
.

Iceland is an advocate of international cooperation in ensuring
sustainable use of living marine resources, including whales. This has been
the position taken by Iceland within the IWC, based on the International
Convention for the Regulation of Whaling from 1946. The stated role of the
IWC, according to its founding Convention, is to ?provide for the proper
conservation of whale stocks and thus make possible the orderly development
of the whaling industry?.

I hope that this information will be useful to you in understanding
Iceland?s position on sustainable whaling. You may rest assured, that the
desire to ensure the conservation of the whale stocks as well as other
marine species is fully shared by the Icelandic Government.

Sincerely yours,


Ragnar Baldursson
Department of Natural Resources and Environment
Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland


For information on the governance of Iceland?s living marine
resources on the web, please refer to, www.fisheries.is For information on
various scientific research projects on whales and other marine mammals in
the North Atlantic please refer to the web site of the Marine Research
Institute: www.hafro.is as well as the North Atlantic Mammal Commission:
www.nammco.no
Thank you for your interest in Iceland?s policy on whaling.
 

Hans L. (958)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 4:16 am
This is what i have received from Iceland!

Thank you for your interest in Iceland?s policy on whaling.

As you may know Iceland is a consistent advocate of the principle of
sustainable use of natural resources. This is reflected in Iceland?s
whaling activities, which have never involved any of the endangered whale
species, killed on a large scale by other whaling nations in the past.

Several countries catch whales, most of them on a much bigger scale
than Iceland. The biggest whaling countries among the members of the
International Whaling Commission (IWC) are the United States, Russia,
Norway, Japan and Greenland. The whaling operations practiced by all those
countries, as well as Iceland, are sustainable and legal and in accordance
with the rules of the IWC.

Iceland fully appreciates the need for careful conservation of marine
resources. Our economy depends on those resources. Iceland was among the
first countries in the world to extend its fishery limits to 200 nautical
miles in the year 1975, in order to put an end to the uncontrolled fishing
around Iceland by trawlers from other countries.

Iceland was also one of the first countries in the world to take a
conservationist approach to whaling. As signs of overexploitation of whales
by other nations emerged early in the last century, Iceland declared a ban
on whaling for large whales around Iceland in 1915. Whaling was not resumed
until 1948, except for limited catches 1935-1939. Strict rules and
limitations were applied to whaling in Iceland from 1948 to 1985 when
commercial whaling was halted again following a decision by the IWC.

Iceland believes that the whaling issue should not be handled as an
exception from the principle of sustainable use of natural resources. A
research plan on common minke whales was implemented 2003 ? 2007 involving
the take of a total 200 animals in order to gain better understanding of
the role of common minke whales in the ecosystem. Important material was
collected, which is now studied by scientists in order to increase our
knowledge on the position of common minke whales in the food chain and how
they prey on other species in their habitat affecting their abundance.

Commercial whaling was resumed in 2006 with 7 fin whales and one
common minke whale caught commercially in that year, in addition to 60
common minke whales caught in accordance with the research plan. The
following year a total of 44 common minke whales were caught in Iceland,
including catches from both commercial whaling operations and the
conclusion of the scientific whaling program. A commercial quota of 40
common minke whales is set for the year 2008. The scientific program is no
longer operated. No quota for fin whales has been issued this year.

The abundance of both common minke whales and fin whales has been
confirmed by the Scientific Committies of the International Whaling
Commission (IWC) and the North-Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission (NAMMCO),
as as can been seen from their websites www.iwcoffice.org and www.nammco.no
.

Iceland is an advocate of international cooperation in ensuring
sustainable use of living marine resources, including whales. This has been
the position taken by Iceland within the IWC, based on the International
Convention for the Regulation of Whaling from 1946. The stated role of the
IWC, according to its founding Convention, is to ?provide for the proper
conservation of whale stocks and thus make possible the orderly development
of the whaling industry?.

I hope that this information will be useful to you in understanding
Iceland?s position on sustainable whaling. You may rest assured, that the
desire to ensure the conservation of the whale stocks as well as other
marine species is fully shared by the Icelandic Government.

Sincerely yours,


Ragnar Baldursson
Department of Natural Resources and Environment
Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland


For information on the governance of Iceland?s living marine
resources on the web, please refer to, www.fisheries.is For information on
various scientific research projects on whales and other marine mammals in
the North Atlantic please refer to the web site of the Marine Research
Institute: www.hafro.is as well as the North Atlantic Mammal Commission:
www.nammco.no
Thank you for your interest in Iceland?s policy on whaling.
 

Hans L. (958)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 4:17 am
Sorry first time did not seem to work! Excusez moi! Entschuldigung Mi Dispiace
 

Pam F. (234)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 5:20 am
Yep,me too,Hans - instant reply as soon as my email was sent! And I personalised the letter considerably - obviously a a waste of time!
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 5:22 am
Well this sounds very reaonable doesnt it? Makes me remember of the WWF who approve hunting and sustainable whaling with the OK of the WWF commercial whaling should be no problem...We will make sure that there will be enough to see if you visit us for whalewatching....they only need one whale maybe three?
I hope that this information will be useful to you in understanding
Iceland?s position on sustainable whaling. You may rest assured, that the
desire to ensure the conservation of the whale stocks as well as other
marine species is fully shared by the Icelandic Government.
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 6:40 am
Whalesrevenge is all that i can say!
I see that we will hardly be able to stop Iceland but we can show them that we dont accept this! I think that they receive many many mails!
And somebody in the government should be able to check out that the world does not accept whaling from a whalewatching nation....!!!! AMEN!
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 6:59 am
No whaling, not commercial, not for science, not for fake research, not for real research, not for traditional reasons! NO WHALING!
Sustainable my ass! Hands of the whales! As soon as commercial whaling is back the quotas will be higher than ever before! With ships bigger better and faster than the biggest ships that they have been using so far!
Send Iceland you regards! And make sure that they understand what you mean!
I believe they dont understand our messages so far!
 

Gina Buss (39)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 9:41 am
signed and noted!
 

Trudi Reijnders (242)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 12:41 pm
Thank you Hans.


Asmundsson(senior official in the Icelandic fisheries ministry) said the decision was taken after it was determined there was need for whale meat on the market.

The decision drew immediate criticism from conservationists.

"We strongly urge the Icelandic government to rethink this decision," said Robbie Marsland, director of the British chapter of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

"The resumption of commercial whaling could prove to be extremely damaging to the already fragile Icelandic economy, and its international reputation."

Icelandic whalers caught 45 whales last year and the meat was sold on the local market.

Iceland is the second country following Norway to authorise commercial whaling. Japan officially hunts whales for scientific purposes, although the whale meat is sold for consumption.


Published today,june 3 on International Herald Tribune:

The United States is calling on Iceland and Norway to reconsider sending whale meat for sale in Japan.
State Department spokesman Kurtis Cooper says the U.S. is "deeply disappointed" by recent reports of the shipments of whale meat to Japanese commercial markets.

He says the U.S. wants the nations involved to focus on the "long term rather than the short term interests of the whaling industry."

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice met last week in Iceland with her counterpart.

Iceland stopped whale hunting in 1986 in line with guidelines laid down by the International Whaling Commission but resumed in 2006. Japan and Norway have long campaigned alongside Iceland to reintroduce commercial whaling.

 

raven sky Zimbalist (261)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 5:00 pm
I signed it.. I posted a story awhile ago on this as well... thanks for doing the petition..
 

Barry Seth (118)
Tuesday June 3, 2008, 7:28 pm
signed and noted
 

Hans L. (958)
Wednesday June 4, 2008, 12:07 am
They also shoot polar bears on Iceland! One polar bear since 20 years what do they do? They just shoot him! Bastards! ICELAND STINKS LET FIGHT THE STINKERS!
 

Past Member (0)
Wednesday June 4, 2008, 5:18 am
Please send a protest email to the Icelandic authorities requesting that they stop the hunt immediately:
http://www.wdcs.org/view_e_protest.php?e_protest_select=14&&select=48
 

Patti R. (210)
Wednesday June 4, 2008, 5:45 am
Signed & Noted
 

Past Member (0)
Wednesday June 4, 2008, 5:53 am
The following words have been taken from my Care2 page.

Please read & maybe share the thoughts of Capt. Watson:

Captain Paul Watson-
The Sea Warrior

BLOOD is about to be spilled
into the icy blue waters off
Antarctica again much of it
within the Australian
Whale Sanctuary. But not if
Captain Paul Watson can
help stop it. "What's the
point of having a whale
sanctuary if you can
kill whales in it?"
.........................................
Captain Watson moment of truth.....
In his own words:
Resignation from Greenpeace
Paul Watson continued as a
crewmember, skipper,
and officer aboard several
Greenpeace voyages
throughout the mid-1970s.
In 1975, during a Greenpeace
campaign to confront Soviet whaling,
an incident occurred which
Watson says changed his life.
From the official Watson biography:
"During this confrontation
with the Russian whaler, a
harpooned and dying sperm whale
loomed over Paul's small boat.
Paul recognized a flicker of
understanding in the dying whale's eye.
He felt that the whale knew
what they were trying to do.
He watched as the magnificent
leviathan heaved its body away
from his boat, slipped beneath
the waves and died. A few
seconds of looking into this dying
whale's eye changed his life forever.
He vowed to become a lifelong
defender of the whales and all
creatures of the seas."

Plant trees for life.......
 

raven sky Zimbalist (261)
Wednesday June 4, 2008, 11:45 am
I just pray they stop soon.
 

Morgan Griffith (225)
Sunday June 8, 2008, 11:09 am
Well I guess Japan and Norway are getting what they wanted. I wonder what the behind closed doors trade off was. I will write emails to this despicable country and let them know no whaling not now not ever. I'd love to know how they come up with totals that says there is a sustainable whale population. That may be for today but what about tomorrow. I will write Japan, Norway, Iceland my own US government and I will write often not just one email to be deleted but emails and letter after letter--they will know my name, they will know my ire, they will know that I will not give up and they will know I call them LIARS, LIARS, LIARS!!!!!!!
 

Hans L. (958)
Sunday June 8, 2008, 11:59 am
Dear Morgan!
Create awareness! And send whales to all the people that want whales!
Fill up the mailboxes.
 
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