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anonymous MYANMAR(BURMA) - CHRISTIANS THAT ARE PERSECUTED IN MYANMAR(BURMA)! October 04, 2007 5:14 AM

This is where you post news events about the Christians in Myanmar(Burma).


This post was modified from its original form on 04 Oct, 5:16  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  October 04, 2007 5:17 AM

Protests in Myanmar(Burma) and military intervention affect Christians!
The government is targeting Christians; the result of protest from Buddist Monks and public rebellion. In Myanmar all religions are severly restricted.
Churches in Burma or Myanmar can not meet. Groups of five Christians are secretlly meeting.  There is a report of five to ten dead but witnesses have seen hundreds of bodies laying around and the hospitals are overly crowded.
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Prayer for the Burma Cristians October 05, 2007 7:59 PM

Dear Heavenly Father, I come to you with heavy heart for the Burma sisters and brothers that are suffering in that war, that has halted the whole country. Dear Jesus, be with your people there and save them from all harm and evil. Let your Angels surround them and keep them safe. Bring peace to that country and give visdom to those in authority to hear your voice and govern, so that suffering will stop to all. In Jesus Name, Amen Henna  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  October 13, 2007 7:58 AM

A follow-up to our January 13 prayer focus on Myanmar (Burma) and Abp. Htay:

We found this story about religious persecution in Myanmar on Pat Dague’s blog Transfigurations.

Excerpt:

Persecution against Christians in Burma revealed in new report called ‘Carrying the Cross’

LONDON, UK — A shocking new report about a range of tactics used by the military regime in Burma to suppress Christianity is about to be released in London.

Called “Carrying the Cross: The military regime’s campaign of restriction, discrimination and persecution against Christians in Burma” it cites a document, allegedly from the Ministry of Religious Affairs, which has been widely circulated in Rangoon with the headline “Programme to destroy the Christian religion in Burma.”

It begins: “There shall be no home where the Christian religion is practiced.”

Read it all. And pray for Christians in Myanmar and that Anglican leaders would take a bold stand against such persecution!

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anonymous From Michael! October 20, 2007 5:18 AM

Help Persecuted Burmese Christians October 04, 2007 6:22 AM

You can PRAY

  • that the persecution in Burma will stop

  • for strength and healing for those who are facing pressure to abandon their faith

  • for release for those in prison for their faith

  • for provision and encouragement for them and their families

  • for the church to flourish even under oppression

You can PROTEST
Write to your senator at U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510, or your representative
at U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20515. (Call the
Capitol Hill Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 to find out your
congressperson’s name). Ask your congressperson to raise your concerns
with both the Congress and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, and to
additionally raise this in appropriate international forums.

Click here for a letter-writing guide:
http://www.csw.org.uk/TakeAction/Protest/index.htm

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20520
Fax: (202) 261-8577
Phone: (202) 647-4000
Email: secretary@state.gov

Burma’s Embassy in the United States
Embassy of the Union of Myanmar
2300 S Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20008
Fax: 202-332-4351
General Information: info@mewashingtondc.com




Information provided by Christian Solidarity Worldwide www.cswusa.com.

God bless and help the Burmese Christians
In Jesus name amen. Michael Owens
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This post was modified from its original form on 20 Oct, 5:19  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  November 09, 2007 9:07 AM

Pakistan and Burma Persecuting Christians
By Gary Lane
CWNews

CWNews.com Gary Lane is CWN’s Chief International Correspondent and partners with The Voice of the Martyrs to bring attention to the persecuted church. He spoke about religious freedom with George Thomas.

George Thomas: Gary, you've been to many of these countries, most recently to Pakistan. How are the Christians there doing now?

Gary Lane : George, they’re concerned about institutionalizedpersecution there: the blasphemy law—and many Christians have ended up in prison—5, 6 years as result of that. False charges of blasphemy against Mohammed and Islam. But also, there is the persecution coming from individuals, particularly at the brick kilns in Pakistan. I have one story I want to share with you. Recently, a man by the name of Mosa Masih, he had been teaching prayer and holding services at the brick kiln for about two years. And he wanted to take 14 families to church during Easter. The brick kiln owner said, ‘If you do that you’re going to have trouble.’ He did it anyway. When he returned, he was hog-tied to a motorcycle and dragged though the brick kiln. He was severely injured and hospitalized. These [he showed a picture] are some of his injuries. That’s the type of persecution that Pakistani Christians deal with every day in Pakistan.

George Thomas: Gary, one of the countries listed on the Commission’s list is Burma, why is Burma on the list?

Gary Lane : Well, because of persecution primarily against the Karen people. They are an ethnic minority, they live in the mountains in the eastern part of Burma. There are about 7 million Karen, and they are lovers of democracy, because about 40 percent to 50 percent of them are Christian. They love democracy, they’ve been fighting for it for about 60 years now. The Burmese military will go into their villages, burn their homes, burn their churches, rape, kill and forcibly conscript some of the young men into the military. And that’s a persecution that’s going on, right now, as we speak, in eastern Burma.

George Thomas: Do you feel like the U.S. government is doing enough to confront these violators?

Gary Lane : Well, George, you saw the video of that church being bulldozed, leveled, in China. What are you going to do when China is one of your largest trade partners, we’re heavily dependent on China for many of our products. Our businesses are very active there. And there’s debate within the State Department and other parts of our government, on whether sanctions are effective anyway. If you don’t have other countries involved, why do them?

George Thomas: I’m sure our viewers will pray for these persecuted believers. Gary Lane, thanks for joining us.

You, our readers, can speak up for the persecuted church by contacting the U.S. State Department directly, by calling: 202-647-4000. s



 




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Are you seeking answers in life? Are you hurting?
Are you facing a difficult situation?

A caring friend will be there to pray with you in your time of need.

 
 November 19, 2007 11:47 PM


Take Steps to Provide Help for Refugee Orphans and Families

CFI serves only as an information resource. The government does not contract with CFI to resettle families and children. We have included important contact information so that you can be involved with the resettlement process.
Find out if there are Karen, Karenni or Chin refugees resettling in your area.

The freedom they have long struggled for may soon be realized by thousands of persecuted Christian Karen and Karenni refugees from Burma who have been living in camps along the Thailand/Burma border. Many of these courageous, mostly Christian refugees are scheduled for resettlement in the United States, or other free nations.

Christian Freedom International welcomes this news. For years CFI has been urging the U.S. government, Thailand, and the U.N. to allow the resettlement of these refugees from Burma. CFI has launched petition drives, sponsored U.S. Congressional staff delegations to the region, had conferences with U.S. Department of State officials and met with First Lady Laura Bush in an effort to gain support for the new policy that is being implemented.

Please keep in mind that in addition to Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM), there will be entire families and groups of refugees who wish to remain together who will be arriving in the United States. Because of the large numbers of these refugees being resettled the need for support will be overwhelming, both for the agencies who have been designated by the U.S. Department of State to manage this effort, and for those of us who choose to help.

Refugee Families and Groups who are together will be handled by the refugee resettlement office within the state to which they are sent. There also may be multiple offices in some states. If your state does NOT have a program for URM children, there is still a great need to help families and individuals by volunteering to help these refugees become oriented and settled into life here in the United States. CFI is working on ways to coordinate support from those in States that do not have a resettlemen

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anonymous  May 07, 2008 3:01 PM

Samaritan's Purse relief workers who arrived in Myanmar two days after the deadly cyclone report a desperate situation in the aftermath of what appears to be the world’s deadliest storm of the 21st century.

Three water specialists from our Canada office, who had already planned the trip to visit a water filter project being conducted by a ministry partner, flew into the capital of Yangon on Monday.

“The city and country are in shock,” said one of our staff members. “Yangon has been heavily hit. Trees and power lines are down, and water availability is severely limited.”

Yangon is located in the Irrawaddy delta, which took a direct hit from Cyclone Nargis. A 12-foot storm surge swept away entire towns and villages.

“Our partner is receiving reports that more than 60 villages were completely wiped out in the delta region,” the Samaritan's Purse worker said. “They have heard forecast deaths of over 100,000, with bodies currently lying in the coastal waters. Many people attempted to escape the rising tides and flooding by climbing on to their roofs, but the cyclone’s strong winds carried people away. Most were unable to swim, and others became exhausted attempting to stay afloat during the 12-hour storm period.”

That figure is almost five times more than the 22,000 the Myanmar government has estimated. According to news reports, as many as 70,000 people are missing in the delta, which has a population of nearly six million people. The official Myanmar government figure for the missing is 41,000. The United Nations estimates that up to a million people could be homeless.

Samaritan's Purse has sent staff members from six countries to a staging area in Bangkok, capital of neighboring Thailand. They are ready to begin extensive relief efforts as soon as the military junta that runs Myanmar grants a United Nations request to grant visas to international relief workers.

“The largest needs include drinking water, food, and shelter,” said our staff already in the country. “The need for water becomes increasingly important in the coming days as disease and dehydration spread.”

WAYS YOU CAN HELP

Pray:
Please pray for the survivors in Myanmar. Ask God to open the doors for Samaritan’s Purse and other Christians to work there. As we meet the emergency needs, we also have opportunities to demonstrate Christian compassion to people who may have never heard the Gospel.

Give:
To support our ministry to victims of the deadly cyclone, please select " Myanmar Relief " on our Donation page.

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anonymous  May 08, 2008 2:32 PM

May 8, 2008

Dear Donna,

The situation in Burma continues to deteriorate as a result of last Saturday’s devastating cyclone and they need your prayers. The pictures we are seeing and the reports coming out of the country are heart-breaking. Many of them have not only lost their homes, but many have lost loved ones.

We need to blanket these hungry and homeless survivors in prayer. Many do not have access to food, clean water or medicine. Even though Burma’s borders may be closed, our prayers can pass through.

The Associated Press reported Wednesday that American diplomat Shari Villarosa said the number of deaths could eventually exceed 100,000 because safe food and water were scarce and unsanitary conditions widespread. The United Nations reported there were 1 million homeless people.  Also, there were reports that the country’s military junta was making it difficult for some international aid to get into Burma, according to Associated Press.

According to the Open Doors’ World Watch List of countries where Christians suffer the worst persecution. Burma is No. 25 on the list of 50 countries. Of the 55 million citizens, approximately 90% are Buddhist and 4% are Christian. As stated in the World Watch List: 

Burma is a police state. The army has ruled the country for many decades. There is limited freedom of religion. Most of the country’s Christians belong to ethnic minorities. Army campaigns against these minorities often have a side-effect of persecuting Christians. The situation for Christians in Rangoon seems to be okay, but it is difficult to assess the situation in the countryside. The regime restricts travel of foreigners. At the end of September 2007, the regime reacted with its usual iron-fist approach to squelch the pro-democracy demonstrations in Burma. Dozens were killed, and hundreds if not thousands were arrested. What was most remarkable in this event was the prominent role Buddhist clergy played in defying the regime and the incredible hardness of the regime against the monks. It seems that the “automatic” link between the regime and the state-controlled form of Buddhism has all but disappeared.

Prayer Points:

  • The leaders of Burma will honor the efforts of others around the world who want to help the survivors
  • The tens of thousands of people missing will be found alive, reunited with their families and the estimated one million homeless will find shelter
  • Food, clean water and medical supplies will be delivered to the most needy as soon as possible
  • Christians in Burma will feel the peace and comfort of worldwide prayers

Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need. Hebrews 4:16

Join me in the first line of defense against this devastation as we pray Burmese victims, rescue operations and the presence of God throughout their nation.

To Him who is our Refuge,
Carl Moeller

Carl Moeller
President/CEO

P.S. Do you want to share a prayer for Burma, have comment on the situation or know someone who was affected by the cyclone? We want to hear from you!  Go to our Blog and post your thoughts.

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anonymous  May 11, 2008 9:28 AM

CHRISTIAN AID LAUNCHES BURMA CYCLONE APPEAL
06 May 2008 15:42:00 GMT
Anjali Kwatra (akwatra@christian-aid.org)
Reuters and AlertNet are not responsible for the content of this article or for any external internet sites. The views expressed are the author's alone.
218275 logo
Christian Aid today launched an appeal to help those left without shelter, food or water in Burma after Cyclone Nargis hit the country. Christian Aid has immediately allocated £50,000 for local partners to carry out relief work and will send more funds as soon as information comes through on what is needed. Communication with Burma has been very difficult because the storm bought down telephone and electricity lines. As many as a million people may be affected. Hundreds of thousands are reported to be in need of shelter and water. Christian Aid partners in Burma have said they urgently need to provide clean water, shelter, food and water purification tablets. The severe cyclone tore through the heavily populated Irrawaddy Delta on the evening of 2 May reaching Rangoon, Burma's largest city, on May 3. Tens of thousands of homes have been damaged, some villages wiped out and many rural areas are still reportedly submerged under saltwater. The Irrawaddy delta region is Burma's rice bowl and the impact on food supplies will be severe.   'The logistics of this disaster are very challenging. Some of the worst hit areas are very poor and remote,' said Christian Aid's Burma expert Ray Hasan. 'We hope that the Burmese government gives aid agencies full access to the affected areas so we can help those in need.' The storm was brewing in the Bay of Bengal for several days but communities in the affected areas would have been ill prepared due to a lack of early warning systems. One of the themes of this year's Christian Aid Week, which runs from May 11 to 17, is teaching communities how to be better prepared when disasters such as cyclones hit. To make a donation please visit http://www.christianaid.org.uk/emergencies/current/burma_cyclone/index.aspx ENDS Notes to editors  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  May 21, 2008 9:57 AM

CHINA & BURMA
Pray for Believers Affected by the Cyclone and Earthquake - VOM Sources

The Voice of the Martyrs is encouraging believers to pray for those affected by the cyclone in Burma (Myanmar) and the earthquake in China. Pray God will comfort Christians who have been displaced and lost loved ones during these natural disasters. Ask Him to provide for them during this difficult time and for the Holy Spirit to be their comforter. Isaiah 61: 1-3  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  May 22, 2008 2:46 PM

Urgent Needs in Myanmar

We have airlifted over 60 tons of emergency supplies for cyclone victims in Myanmar, and our staff and volunteers are working hard to meet the needs of people impacted by tornadoes in Macon, Georgia. Read more about Myanmar and Georgia.  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  May 25, 2008 9:47 AM

THE KAREN TRIBES!
The Karen Tribes are Christians who are persecuted in Myanmar and are also affected by the recent storm.
I was glad to hear from the Good Samaritan because until now I had not heard of how our Christian brothers and sisters were doing. Good Samaritan is helping the Karen Tribes who are also storm victims.
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anonymous  May 30, 2008 2:41 PM

However, Teh said the information came from a relief worker who had just returned from the affected area and that "tears were shed" when he recounted his findings to UNICEF officials earlier in the day.

At a church in Yangon, meanwhile, more than 400 cyclone victims from the delta township of Labutta were evicted Friday following orders from authorities a day earlier.

"It was a scene of sadness, despair and pain," said a church official at the Yangon Karen Baptist Home Missions, speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of official reprisal. "Those villagers lost their homes, their family members and the whole village was washed away. They have no home to go back to."

All the refugees except for a few pregnant women, two young children and those with severe illnesses left the church in 11 trucks Friday morning, the official said.

Authorities told church workers the victims would first be taken to a government camp in Myaung Mya — a mostly undamaged town in the Irrawaddy delta. It was not immediately clear when they would be resettled in their villages.

Aid groups said Myanmar's military government was still hindering foreign assistance for victims of the cyclone, despite a promise to U.N. Secretary Ban Ki-moon to ease travel restrictions.

Some foreign aid workers are still awaiting visas, and the government is taking 48 hours to process requests to enter the Irrawaddy delta, the groups said.

They said the International Red Cross was waiting for permission to send 30 foreign staffers into the delta.

An estimated 2.4 million people remain homeless and hungry from the cyclone, which left at least 134,000 people dead or missing.

UNICEF's Teh said many people were also being forced to return from camps to their homes in Labutta, a low-lying area that took the brunt of Cyclone Nargis nearly a month ago.

Centralizing stricken people in the centers had made it easier for aid agencies to deliver emergency relief since many villages in the delta can only be reached by boat or over very rough roads.

The UNICEF official said some refugees were "given rations and then they are forced to move." But others were denied aid because they had lost their government identity cards, he said.

The government has not given a reason for moving people out of camps and shelters, but last week it declared the "relief" phase of the rescue effort over and said "reconstruction" was under way.

Foreign aid experts disagree, arguing many people are still in need of emergency assistance for food and shelter, as well as medical care.

Aid workers who have reached some of the remote villages say little remains to sustain survivors. Houses are destroyed, livestock have perished and food stocks have virtually run out. Medicines are nonexistent.

Terje Skavdal, a senior U.N. official in Bangkok, said he could not confirm the camp closures but any forced movement was "completely unacceptable."

"People need to be assisted in the settlements and satisfactory conditions need to created before they can return to their place of origins," Skavdal, head of the Asia-Pacific region's U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, told reporters. "Any forced or coerced movement of people is completely unacceptable."

"We urge speedy implementation of all agreements on access, visas and use of logistical assets," Skavdal said. "We need to see more relief experts, including (those) from the (International Red Cross), getting into the delta as soon as possible without bureaucratic hindrance."

The government has said the wait for approval to enter the delta has been shortened from two weeks to two days for U.N. staff, but "it's unclear how long the process will be for the NGOs (non-governmental organizations). The staff are urgently required on the ground," he said.

The military regime only agreed to allow foreign aid workers in after the U.N. chief met with junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe last weekend.

The country's leaders are leery of foreign aid workers and international agencies, worrying they could weaken the junta's powerful grip.

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anonymous  May 30, 2008 2:42 PM

However, Teh said the information came from a relief worker who had just returned from the affected area and that "tears were shed" when he recounted his findings to UNICEF officials earlier in the day.

At a church in Yangon, meanwhile, more than 400 cyclone victims from the delta township of Labutta were evicted Friday following orders from authorities a day earlier.

"It was a scene of sadness, despair and pain," said a church official at the Yangon Karen Baptist Home Missions, speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of official reprisal. "Those villagers lost their homes, their family members and the whole village was washed away. They have no home to go back to."

All the refugees except for a few pregnant women, two young children and those with severe illnesses left the church in 11 trucks Friday morning, the official said.

Authorities told church workers the victims would first be taken to a government camp in Myaung Mya — a mostly undamaged town in the Irrawaddy delta. It was not immediately clear when they would be resettled in their villages.

Aid groups said Myanmar's military government was still hindering foreign assistance for victims of the cyclone, despite a promise to U.N. Secretary Ban Ki-moon to ease travel restrictions.

Some foreign aid workers are still awaiting visas, and the government is taking 48 hours to process requests to enter the Irrawaddy delta, the groups said.

They said the International Red Cross was waiting for permission to send 30 foreign staffers into the delta.

An estimated 2.4 million people remain homeless and hungry from the cyclone, which left at least 134,000 people dead or missing.

UNICEF's Teh said many people were also being forced to return from camps to their homes in Labutta, a low-lying area that took the brunt of Cyclone Nargis nearly a month ago.

Centralizing stricken people in the centers had made it easier for aid agencies to deliver emergency relief since many villages in the delta can only be reached by boat or over very rough roads.

The UNICEF official said some refugees were "given rations and then they are forced to move." But others were denied aid because they had lost their government identity cards, he said.

The government has not given a reason for moving people out of camps and shelters, but last week it declared the "relief" phase of the rescue effort over and said "reconstruction" was under way.

Foreign aid experts disagree, arguing many people are still in need of emergency assistance for food and shelter, as well as medical care.

Aid workers who have reached some of the remote villages say little remains to sustain survivors. Houses are destroyed, livestock have perished and food stocks have virtually run out. Medicines are nonexistent.

Terje Skavdal, a senior U.N. official in Bangkok, said he could not confirm the camp closures but any forced movement was "completely unacceptable."

"People need to be assisted in the settlements and satisfactory conditions need to created before they can return to their place of origins," Skavdal, head of the Asia-Pacific region's U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, told reporters. "Any forced or coerced movement of people is completely unacceptable."

"We urge speedy implementation of all agreements on access, visas and use of logistical assets," Skavdal said. "We need to see more relief experts, including (those) from the (International Red Cross), getting into the delta as soon as possible without bureaucratic hindrance."

The government has said the wait for approval to enter the delta has been shortened from two weeks to two days for U.N. staff, but "it's unclear how long the process will be for the NGOs (non-governmental organizations). The staff are urgently required on the ground," he said.

The military regime only agreed to allow foreign aid workers in after the U.N. chief met with junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe last weekend.

The country's leaders are leery of foreign aid workers and international agencies, worrying they could weaken the junta's powerful grip.

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anonymous  May 30, 2008 2:48 PM

Brothers and Sisters please forgive me, but I am afraid for our brothers and sisters in Myammar.
'Please pray that they will be treated nicely and make it out alive.'
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anonymous  May 30, 2008 3:40 PM

PRAYER WARRIORS!
I WOULD LIKE TO CALL UPON ALL PRAYER WARRIORS TO PRAY FOR THE RELOCATED CHRISTIANS IN MYANMAR! And also for the four pastors in China that have been accused of treason!
If you believe in fasting, please fast, if you believe in candlelight vigils please try to have one and if your church has a good prayer chain or prayer group going, please have them pray. I really believe we should pray with everything we have in our hearts, and call out to Jesus to help our brothers and sisters in these distant lands. And other countries also, such as Pakistan and Iraq! Thank you and God Bless You.  I know God will bless you for all your prayers and dedication!
Your sister in Christ,
Donna
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anonymous  May 31, 2008 6:36 AM

Anupama Rao Singh, regional director of the United Nations Children's Fund who visited the affected area recently warned Saturday against premature resettlement, even if it's voluntary. She did not confirm that evictions had taken place.

"Premature resettlements to the villages, even if it's voluntary, will cause serious risks to the refugees," she said.

"Many of the villages remain inundated with water, making it difficult to rebuild. There is also a real risk that once they are resettled, they will be invisible to aid workers. Without support and continued service to those affected, there is a risk of a second wave of disease and devastation," she added.

An estimated 2.4 million people remain homeless and hungry from this month's cyclone, which left at least 134,000 people dead or missing.

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anonymous  June 05, 2008 6:56 PM

Greetings Church:

 

IS GOD GREATER THAN THE UN? – Of course the answer to that is YES! Most of us have read or heard about the recent tragedy that struck Myanmar (formerly Burma) and how many thousands and thousands were lost or killed; have lost their homes and are now in starvation and under the onslaught of diseases; and how the UN has tried to get aid into the country. The UN has been minimally successful and the suffering continues. The government of Burma is a fascists régime bent on genocide of its own population.

 

But among the rubble, destruction, death and the hideousness of man’s injustice toward man, there is a bright Light. Yes the Body of Christ lives on in Burma. We are in contact with a pastor we have known for some time who pastors the underground church and Bible College in the nation, and Sonday has found a way to help. It is God opening the door that no man can shut. If you would like to join us in this compassionate act, send your donations today. They are totally tax exempt in the USA: Mail your checks to Sonday International.Org, P.O. Box 357, Splendora, TX 77372; or you can donate online at www.sonintl.org/donate.htm using the security of PayPal.

 

PASTORS: I need your help in this effort. We aren’t asking for huge donations. Five thousand people a week read this newsletter and if we received $1.00 from each, it would make a huge difference for the suffering saints in Myanmar. Please ask the Lord what he would have you do and email me at Kathi@sonintl.org.

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anonymous  June 10, 2008 10:46 AM

Ready for the Test
 
Brother Aung was 16 years old when he started attending an English school taught by a local Christian missionary in his village in Burma.  The village was spiritually a very dark place because there were no Christians.  All of the people are either Buddhists or Animists (worshiping their ancestors).
 
The missionary was very kind and soon they became good friends.  The missionary told Aung about a living God; One that came to be with His people, teaching ways to live and how you could know Him.  Soon Aung felt a longing to know and worship this living God.  He committed his life to Jesus and decided to not turn back.  This was a decision that would soon be tested.
 
After a while the time came for him to share his faith with his parents and siblings.  Suddenly his parents where very angry with him screaming, ”Why are you telling us about Jesus!”  They could not understand why their son had been the first in their village to become Christian.  They threw his Bible out of the house and told him that he could not live with them if he was a Christian.  The choice was very clear.  Either he follow the living God or the ways of his parents!  Aung said, “I am sorry when I had to leave my parents.  If I stay I will be in hell.  I need Jesus more than the love of my parents.”  This too was a decision that would be tested.
 
Feeling that God had called him out of his village for a special purpose he traveled to Yangoon, the capital, to attend Bible school.  “I am called to be a minister”, he said. Soon after beginning school he became paralyzed from the waist down.  He was afraid and no one could explain why this had happened.  What was the reason?  Had he caused this by living for Jesus?  After four weeks the missionary from his village came to visit.  He prayed for Aung and he was instantly healed.  Hearing the story about their son’s sickness and how he was healed his parent were amazed!
 
Aung said,”I believe this all happened to persuade my parents that Jesus is the one true living God and to bring glory to God.”  He added, “They are listening a little bit.  They are not so angry with me.  I always pray for them.”
 
Focus on Persecution (Focus) is helping Aung continue his schooling.  Currently he attends classes and helps to evangelize alongside his Pastor.  But what does he plan to do after graduation?  Aung said very matter-of-factly, ”I will go wherever God places me.  I am dedicated to serving my Lord.”  
 
Please pray for Brother Aung and his parents.  Aung was the first person to make a decision for Christ in his village.  His family could be the next.  If you would like to write a short note of encouragement to Aung please do so.  We will translate your note and deliver it to him.  Please send to Focus on Persecution, PO Box 1042, Bartlesville, OK 74005. To send an email please click here.
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anonymous  June 10, 2008 10:49 AM

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anonymous  August 14, 2008 10:56 AM

When cyclone Nargis struck in early May, the forgotten country of Myanmar was thrust into the world’s media spotlight. The images of destruction and desolation which filled our TV screens are not easily forgotten.

But there is a story which never hit the headlines. A story of suffering, injustice and persecution. It’s the story of Myanmar’s tribal Christians.

Pastor Henry is one of them. A courageous servant of God, he recently left his village and made a risky border-crossing into a neighboring country. There he was met by an Open Doors team, who took time to encourage and pray with Henry—and to ask him about the suffering of believers inside Myanmar today.
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anonymous  August 28, 2008 7:07 AM

BURMESE JUNTA PREVENTS CHRISTIANS AND BUDDHISTS FROM PROVIDING HELP, INCREASING CENSORSHIP: The military feels increasingly threatened by the growing solidarity and collaboration between believers of various religions. The generals are increasing controls, exploiting refugee labor and trafficking in international aid. Nobel Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrested is extended. Full Story>>  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  February 15, 2009 6:37 AM

New restrictions placed upon Christian house churches in the Burmese capital of Yangon in January soon spread to established churches, threatening to close 80 percent of the city's congregations.

Government orders issued January 5 forced many Christians meeting in homes or apartments—a growing practice since authorities stopped issuing construction permits for new churches in the late 1990s—to cease gathering for worship. Weeks later, officials ordered several major Yangon churches, including Wather Hope Church, Emmanuel Church, and the Assemblies of God Church, to stop holding services.

Pastors from more than 100 Yangon churches were summoned to a meeting and told to sign documents pledging to cease operation of their churches, according to Mizzima, a Burmese news agency. The documents threatened punishment, including potential jail terms and the sealing of church facilities, for pastors who refused to obey the closure orders.

Some observers suggested the crackdown was related to Christian involvement in relief efforts for the victims of Cyclone Nargis, which hit Myanmar in May 2008. The country's isolationist military government initially banned foreign aid, but Christians delivering relief supplies to the Irrawaddy Delta region raised fears that Buddhists who accepted aid from Christians might convert.

The church closure orders may simply be an extension of Myanmar's existing religious policies, which elevate Buddhism—practiced by 82 percent of the population—in an effort to solidify national identity.

Reports from various mission groups suggest Christianity is flourishing under the regime, but believers must be creative in finding places to worship, particularly in rural areas.

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 June 09, 2009 8:28 PM

Dear Donna Matthews,
 
Thank you for praying for the children who were attacked last week in our new orphanage in Burma. We are pleased to report that all 90 of our children have been safely accounted for! We're so grateful to the Father for his provision and protection and to you for praying for their safety.

It appears at this point that our orphanage was caught in the middle of a major offensive by the Burmese forces against the Karen people. News reports have surfaced that three to four thousand Karen have since fled into Thailand to escape attacks on camps along the Thai border. Please continue to cover them in prayer.
 
Here's the report from our representative on the ground with the kids:
 
First of all, we thank God that all children and many other families survived. ... Our first stop was to see and help the KT children from Burma. The children were gathered at  a Christian orphanage on the Thai side, which is just across the river of KT, Burma. The children were so happy to see our family, we brought them food, clothes, medicines, mats and plastic. Our children (90 of them) can stay here but they still sleep in the open, there is not enough space for them, this orphanage has already 55 children of their own.
We are allowed to build new dorms and a new school for our 90 children. We hope to start with this asap. This property belongs to a Christian based NGO and because of the current situation, the Thai government allows us to have our KT children here as well.
 
Although we did learn that our buildings were not destroyed - it is common for the army to surround villages with landmines so that the people cannot safely return to their homes. As you read, we will be building new dorms and a school for the children on the Thai side of the border.
 
If you would like to help with the financial needs for the kids as we rebuild, you can go to http://www.persecution.org/suffering/donation.php and include in the note that your gift is for the "Burma orphanage."
 
Thank you,
 
ICC
 
International Christian Concern
P.O. Box 8056
Silver Spring, MD 20907
Phone: (800) ICC-5441
Fax: (301) 585-5918
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