5 Unexpected Animals Who Have Stopped Traffic

Editor’s note: This Care2 favorite was originally posted on January 1, 2016. Enjoy!

A 500-pound elephant seal hauling herself across a Northern California highway stalled traffic for more than an hour several years ago, but she is just one among a handful of animals who’ve held up the streets. Here are five unexpected animals who have stopped traffic:

1. Elephant Seals

Impatient motorists near Sears Point tried to shoo the behemoth back toward San Pablo Bay as she tried to cross a state highway. This only incensed her, and she began to attack cars. Even after reps from state Fish and Wildlife ushered her back to the bay, the seal seemed resolved to try again — despite no water on the street’s north end.

“[She] is very committed to cross Highway 37,” said Andrew Barclay of highway patrol to The Press Democrat. “[She's] swimming in circles, popping out of the water, staring at me very grumpily because I’m in [her] way.”

2. Ducks

Back in 2012, a police officer slowed the morning rush on a Washington State freeway to give safe passage to a wayward band of ducks. A video of the incident shows a flashing cop car guarding the fowl family as they cross through five lanes of traffic.

3. Three-toed Sloths

OK, so maybe saying that this sloth stopped traffic in Costa Rica is a stretch. But watching a tentative motorcyclist hoist the endangered slowpoke out of harm’s way warms the heart too much to ignore.

4. Sea Turtles

ThinkstockPhotos-89328501

Turtle crossing” signs now slow traffic near Ontario, Canada, after a woman named Andrea pressed the county to erect them after she found a snapping turtle with a crushed shell still alive in the street. While the turtle, who she called June, eventually died from a punctured lung, her eggs were in a safer situation — and so are other turtles who routinely cross in that area today.

5. Toads

Each spring, motorists in Pennsylvania take a detour to let thousands of toads cross a rural road to lay and fertilize their eggs at a nearby reservoir. In 2013, volunteers saved a total of 2,000 toads.

While most of these stories have happy endings, too many don’t. In the U.S. alone, cars on roadways kill one million animals a day. Encourage your leaders to build overpasses locally to help wildlife cross busy streets. And if you come across a creature en route, remember the basics: Slow down, ease slowly on the brakes and don’t move hit animals — you may injure them or yourself further. Call an expert like animal control instead.

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

178 comments

Marie W
Marie W3 months ago

Thank you.

SEND
Paulo R
Paulo R9 months ago

ty

SEND
Paulo R
Paulo R9 months ago

ty

SEND
Paulo R
Paulo R9 months ago

ty

SEND
Ingrid H
Past Member 9 months ago

Thanks for posting

SEND
Maria R
Past Member 9 months ago

thanks

SEND
KimJ M
KimJ M9 months ago

Thanks for sharing

SEND
KimJ M
KimJ M9 months ago

Thanks for sharing

SEND
KimJ M
KimJ M9 months ago

Thanks for sharing

SEND
KimJ M
KimJ M9 months ago

Thanks for sharing

SEND