7 Things to Know About Roy Moore and Alabama’s Special Election

The U.S. Senate is getting nervous about what Christmas gift the voters of Alabama may deliver on December 12.

Here are 7 things to know about the Alabama Special Election:

1. December 12 is the date for the Alabama special election to choose someone to complete the term of Jeff Sessions, former Alabama senator and now U.S. Attorney General.

Alabama counties will have until December 22 to certify results, but it’s possible one or two counties may miss that deadline, so that the results might not be certified until December 26.

There are two candidates: Democrat Doug Jones and Republican Roy Moore, and once the certified election results are available, the new senator will be sworn in at the next open session of the Senate, in early January.

2. Roy Moore calls himself a Christian, but his actions suggest otherwise. Moore was first elected chief justice of Alabama in 2000, and ever since then he has criticized LGBTQ people, questioned the ability of “adulterous” parents to raise children and defied orders to remove a Ten Commandments monument displayed on public property.

“Homosexual conduct is, and has been, considered abhorrent immoral, detestable, a crime against nature, and a violation of the laws of nature and of nature’s God upon which this nation and our laws are predicated, ” Moore wrote in one case.

In 2003 Moore was removed as chief justice after he refused to remove a Ten Commandments monument form the Alabama Judicial Building. He was elected chief justice once more in 2012, but was again kicked out in 2016 when he instructed probate judges not to issue licenses for same-sex marriages.

This is not Christian. This is bigotry, plain and simple. Growing up in a Christian home in England, where my father was a Church of England vicar, I was taught to love and respect everyone. Roy Moore is the very antithesis of what it means to be a Christian.

3. As of November 16, eight women had come forward to suggest questionable behavior or to claim sexual assault by Roy Moore. You can click here to see the details, but the youngest is a then-14-year-old who alleges Moore initiated sexual contact with her when he was in his early 30s.

4. Alabama’s largest newspapers declared that “Decency Comes First.” The Alabama Media Group stepped up last weekend and pasted an editorial across the front of Sunday’s newspapers: “Stand for Decency, Reject Roy Moore” read the headline.

The editorial went on to urge voters to reject Moore, and also endorsed his Democratic opponent Doug Jones.

Speaking to NPR, Michelle Holmes, the company’s vice-president of content, said, “This was an easy decision to make. We believe like many, many Alabamians that decency comes first. And we have rejected Roy Moore before in editorials, and we will continue to do so.”

Holmes went on to say that this election is “a chance (for women) to make their voices heard in a state that has silenced them for too long.”

5. National Republicans have come out against Moore while Alabamian Republicans have supported him. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said last Monday that he believes the women who have come out with allegations against Moore. “I believe the women, yes,” McConnell said.

The Republican National Committee and even Ivanka Trump, the president’s daughter, have said they believe Moore’s accusers, with both House Speaker Pual Ryan and Attorney General Jeff Sessions following suit.

6. Not many national Republicans are left standing beside Moore, but on November 21, Donald Trump weighed in.

“Let me tell you, Roy Moore denies it. That’s all I can say. He denies it. And, by the way he totally denies it,” Trump told reporters.

This is of course exactly what Trump did when he himself was confronted by allegations of sexual assault. So we have the ugly spectacle of one sexual predator supporting another one.

7. What will happen? As Care2′s Robin Marty explains here, Moore is not going to drop out, and even if he did, there is no way to get his name off the ballot. The three options are Moore, Democratic candidate Doug Jones or a write-in candidate.

So while we have the twisted logic of Alabama Governor Kay Ivey saying she’ll vote for Moore anyway, in spite of the sexual assault claims, because he is a Republican, we also have the spectacle of Republicans in Congress declaring their intent to unseat the candidate even if he is elected.

We’ll know in a few short weeks how this is playing out.

 

Photo Credit: Screenshot from Time Video

91 comments

Chrissie R
Chrissie Ryesterday

Thank you for posting.

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Karen H
Karen H20 days ago

What's really sad is how many people supported Moore, an accused pedophile. Their GOP party is more important to them than the safety of their children. Someone said, "Trump has five children by three different women and his supporters don't think that's a big deal. If Obama had five children by three different women, that would be a whole 'nother story." How true.

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Joan E
Joan E23 days ago

Some men are jerks for life, and Roy Moore is one of them.

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Marigold A
Past Member 29 days ago

Thank you for posting.

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Jerome S
Jerome S29 days ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S29 days ago

thanks

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Jim Ven
Jim V29 days ago

thanks for sharing

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Jim Ven
Jim V29 days ago

thanks for sharing

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mmmm w
mmmm wabout a month ago

less, not moore

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Mike R
Mike Rabout a month ago

By bye Moore.

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