Donald Trump Announces End to Historic Iran Deal

On Tuesday, May 8, Donald Trump made good on a threat and announced that he wants to withdraw the United States from the Iran nuclear deal framework — sometimes known just as the “Iran deal.”

President Trump’s decision could make the deal fall apart, even though numerous nations are involved. Politicians and diplomats all over the world are understanably concerned about the grave implications of his actions — after all, it’s bad news for diplomacy, national security and the future of the Middle East.

Take Action: Join Care2 activists calling on Congress to demand that Trump reconsider this disastrous decision.

So what is the Iran deal, exactly? Finalized in 2015, this deal created a framework for addressing concerns about Iran’s nuclear program. World leaders worried that Iran was in a position to develop an atomic bomb, which could add further instability to the Middle East and set the stage for a dangerous situation.

The United States was a key architect of the deal, but the European Union also participated, along with the entire UN Security Council. The deal severely curtailed nuclear activity in Iran and mandated International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitoring, in exchange for lifting certain sanctions.

This deal represented a huge victory for those working to reduce the burden of nuclear weapons worldwide. And, critically, it did not restrict the United States’ ability to impose non-nuclear sanctions, such as penalties for human rights violations.

Trump repeatedly mocked and criticized the deal throughout his campaign, and he set the stage to withdraw from it when he claimed that Iran was not compliant with the terms. Tellingly, two pro-Iran deal officials were fired shortly before this decision, when Trump ousted former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and national security advisor H.R. McMaster.

European governments have announced their intent to keep working on the agreement, even if the United States isn’t involved. They also expressed concerns that actions on the part of the U.S. could make it more challenging for them to work with Iran on creating an enforceable and mutually agreeable deal.

Israel, however, welcomed the news, which may set the stage for future conflicts — or not so future: Shortly after Trump’s announcement, there was an airstrike in Syria that’s being attributed to Israel.

Experts fear that Trump’s move may destabilize the Iranian government, making President Hassan Rouhani look foolish or weak for trying to cooperate with the U.S. Iran’s government already struck back in response to Trump’s decision, claiming his move was “illegal” and “undermines international agreements.”

In the short term, Trump’s decision would free the United States to reimpose nuclear sanctions on Iran, cutting off billions of dollars worth of assets. This would impact the U.S. economy, as well as European nations that conduct business with Iran. Violating American sanctions could have repercussions for those who want to continue to work with the U.S., or use American banks.

Meanwhile, remaining signatories to the deal would need to work closely with Iran in an attempt to salvage the agreement. And evidence suggests that shredding the deal could enable secret work that would help Iran develop a nuclear bomb — the very thing the deal was designed to stop.

In the long term, this aggressive move may not go over well with foes and allies alike. Other nations may be reluctant to enter into deals like this one with the United States, fearing that they’d have to make sacrifices to meet the terms while the U.S. might decide to walk away at any time. Allies might be reluctant to involve the U.S. in decision-making — like that flaky friend you never loop in during event planning, but on an international scale. And, of course, when the United States needs to call on allies for assistance, or wants to use its weight to hold other countries accountable, the decision to break the Iran deal may be held over the nation.

Take Action!

Join other Care2 activists in calling on Congress to ask Trump to reconsider.

In addition to signing the petition, you can also contact your elected officials directly. You can ask them to pressure the White House to stick with the deal — and, short of that, to refrain from imposing sanctions or taking other actions that would make it difficult for remaining signatories to reach an agreement with Iran.

Creating a Care2 petition is easy. If you have an issue you care deeply about, why not start your own petition? Here are some guidelines to help you get started and soon the Care2 community will be signing up to support you.

 

Photo Credit: Elvert Barnes/Flickr

55 comments

Rhoberta E
Rhoberta E3 months ago

brian f
I know all about research and I also know about the less than honest sites you associate with along with david f.
YOU are the epitome of a troll with a repetitious narrative. You stop posting your same crap and I'll stop calling you on it. Members are sick to death of your brain freeze and 2016 Go ahead see if you can go 24 hours without your usual cut and paste. Do some research yourself on the Russia connection. quit hiding behind your huge pity party about Ms. Stein not even getting close to anything except being arrested, dinner with putin and refusal to turn over documents.
remember, try for 24 hours..

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Brian F
Brian F3 months ago

Rhoberta E It doesn't take much to google how Israel lied to international inspectors, and developed their nuclear weapons program. Do a little easy research, and maybe people could think you're more than a troll.

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Rhoberta E
Rhoberta E3 months ago

brian f
Show your actual current source for your "they built a fake wall" otherwise your posts are just as outdated as your 2016 rhetoric or just conspiracy theories like most of your information.

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Janis K
Janis K3 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Annabel Bedini
Annabel Bedini3 months ago

BrianF
I didn't know about Israel's cheating like that! Really? It must have been some time back though and I hope the IAEA these days has more efficient surveillance and intelligence than back then. But I suppose you might be right and it's impossible to be one hundred per cent certain.

Paul B
I asked you a couple of polite questions. Can you see your way to giving me answers? Just good manners.....

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Darlene Buckingham
Darlene B3 months ago

Nuclear weapons should not be in the hands of anybody. They are difficult to produce and cause way too much death and destruction. Instead of arguing whether Iran or Korea should have nuclear weapons people of peace have to advocate that all nuclear weapons be disarmed and stop supporting and believing that war is necessary. Saying that war is necessary is the biggest lie of all!

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Brian F
Brian F3 months ago

Annabel Israel used a fake wall to hide their nuclear weapons program, and successfully developed nuclear weapons. I'm in full agreement with the deal, but the larger point is, can the international community really be sure any nation is not hiding their nuclear weapons orogram?

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Danuta W
Danuta Watola3 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Annabel Bedini
Annabel Bedini3 months ago

Paul B
You say 'they never stopped'. Are you saying the Iranians never stopped working towards nuclear capability? If so, I agree with Rhoberta in questioning your sources. The IAEA inspectors have had regular free access to all possible nuclear activity sites since the Deal was agreed and have unequivocally and consistantly stated that Iran is abiding by the Deal. Are you putting their reports among the 'somewhat biased' sources that shouldn't be trusted because they are mere 'opinion and speculation'? My question to you is, where are you getting your version of 'facts' from and above all why are you believing them?

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Rhoberta E
Rhoberta E3 months ago

paul b
You miss the point as usual.
I am saying that it is up to ALL of us to find sources that aptly and honestly describe an event. Google is just a STARTING POINT. We are NOT clones thank goodness and if you choose to read and believe hate and divisiveness that's on you.
I AM a liberal thinking human being and DO believe in helping and believe in the thought that sometimes we may all need help in one way or another.
I say thanks every day that I live in a country where war or the fear of guns is not front and centre. Canada participates too with world problems but I never hear the kind of animosity from most Canadians that I do here (on C2).
I'm actually sad that some of trump's nastiness seems to be rubbing off on people who think the way you do. Eh !!!
You can't justify hate and greed .
At least I can't

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