Trump, Clinton Score Big Wins in New York Primary

The New York primary is officially over, and New York businessman Donald Trump and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton both won their party’s respective races as predicted.

But the biggest loser of the evening were the tens of thousands of New York voters who learned that despite being one of the most progressive states in the country, the New York voting regulations are some of the most regressive laws in the nation.

Primary day was riddled with accounts of voters learning that they had been struck from the rolls at their polling places, or that they were unable to vote because they weren’t officially registered with either major party. Although New York’s closed primary system has been in place for four decades, for a mass of newer voters eager to participate it was a disheartening discovery, and one that had many casting provisional ballots or heading to court to find election judges with whom they could argue their case in person.

“[Averell Golub, a clerk for Judge Genine Edwards], like state and city election officials before him, chalked up the mass confusion and observations of overwhelming dysfunction to new voter ignorance of New York’s closed primary system and early party-change deadline,” reports Gothamist, a local New York publication. “He said when Judge Edwards denied people’s claims, court staffers instructed them how to file an affidavit ballot, to be considered and possibly counted following the election. He acknowledged that ‘one or two’ cases he’d seen were attributable to clerical errors by the BOE. At the end of the day, he said, the judge went easy. ‘More [requests] were approved than not,’ he said.”

Voting issues appear to be both widespread and bizarrely random.

“An entire block of Clinton Hill residents was left off the voter’s registration list at one local polling station during Tuesday’s primary election, according to poll workers,” writes Alexandra Leon at DNAInfo.com. “At least seven voters who live on Lafayette Avenue and were assigned to vote at P.S. 11 in Clinton Hill, at 419 Waverly Ave., did not show up on the list and had to cast their vote by filling out an affidavit, poll workers said.”

The state A.G. reported over 400 complaints to the voter hotline by evening, a vast uptick in comparison to the mere 150 calls during the 2012 general election, and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to investigate the voter purges and other issues plaguing the state, stating that, “The perception that numerous voters may have been disenfranchised undermines the integrity of the entire electoral process and must be fixed.”

Despite the voter issues, hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers did manage to cast ballots to select their party’s candidates, and both Trump and Clinton handily won their races.

Businessman Donald Trump’s victory was called moments after the polls closed, and he easily outpaced runners up Ohio Governor John Kasich and Texas Senator Ted Cruz, securing well over 60 percent of the GOP vote and solidly breaking the 50 percent threshold to sweep most of the states’s 95 delegates – losing just a delegate here and there in a few districts where he did not break the 50 percent mark.

Whether those delegates will continue to stay pledged to him after the first ballot at the Republican National Convention may be in doubt, if other state delegates are any indication, but Trump will now be only about 400 delegates away from securing the nomination on the first ballot unless the GOP can come up with a new way to stop him.

For Democrats, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders’ massive spending in the state of New York failed to secure him the come-from-behind victory he so desperately wanted. Likely aware that they would not be able to get a win in the state, the campaign instead projected that the Clinton victory needed to be at least a double digit one to truly have any impact on the race.

“A single-digit victory for Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton in the New York primary should be seen as an ‘embarrassment,’ Bernie Sanders’s campaign manger said Tuesday ahead of the results,” the Hill reports. “‘They elected her senator here twice. If she comes out of here with a single-digit win, my god it’s an embarrassment,’ Jeff Weaver said.”

Instead of a single digit win, however, Clinton beat Sanders by about 15 percnt, surprising those who believed the exit polls that had Sanders trailing by just a few points. Sanders’ significant loss put a halt to a series of victories that had managed to gain him 88 pledged delegates more than Clinton and had narrowed her lead in pledged delegates to just 244. Clinton’s large win in New York will likely have her gaining another 30 pledged delegates over Sanders, and as FiveThirtyEight reports his path to the nomination is increasingly narrow and involves some massive and highly unlikely wins.

The next election contest is Tuesday, April 26, and Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island will be voting.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

81 comments

Naomi D
Naomi Dreyer5 months ago

nice photo, although old (2 yrs) of Mrs. Clinton

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Danuta W
Danuta W5 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jetana A
Jetana A5 months ago

WTF, Care2? Don't you ever delete outdated articles? The election was over 2 years ago!

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Camilla Vaga
Camilla Vaga5 months ago

thx

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Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus2 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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ERIKA SOMLAI
ERIKA S2 years ago

noted

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Dan Blossfeld
Dan B2 years ago

Brian F.,
Not so fast there. Clinton is only half way there. She still needs to win in November, which is likely to be a more difficult fight.

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Brian F.
Brian F2 years ago

By funding his campaign with small donations raised on line, Sanders has not only walked his talk, he’s stripped away the easy defense of “they all do it.” Sanders has correctly pointed out that Hillary is dishonestly taking money from Wall Street and corporations for speeches and her super pac. In response, Clinton has put forth additional, but troublesome arguments. She dismisses Sanders’ indictment of her funding ties as an unjustified attack on her character. She demands evidence of a specific vote or act that was done in return for a contribution. And she invokes the Obama defense: President Obama collected big bucks from Wall Street too. This is not an acceptable excuse to say someone else did it. It's like justifying robbing a bank by saying someone else did it, too, so it's ok. The democratic party must be clear that it stands for curbing the role of big money and private interests in politics, for cleaning out the stables in Washington, and for making politicians responsive to the people who vote for them, not the corporations and wealthy who fund them. This surely will be one of the issues that Sanders carries into the convention. And it is one that Democrats and Clinton should adopt as central to their platform. No Democrat should adopt the situational Clinton defenses of her fundraising. Hillary's nefarious ties to Wall Street and corporations are wrong, and must be called out by all democrats

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Brian F.
Brian F2 years ago

Hillary has already won the White house. The corporate media has coronated her. She is a crook and a liar, who has already taken $650,000 for speeches for Goldman Sachs, and millions from her corporate masters to support her super pac. The corporations that own this country will be pleased that their puppet is in power. Bernie Sanders cannot win, because he is honest and hasn't taken any money from Wall street or corporations, like Hillary has.

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Dan Blossfeld
Dan B2 years ago

Now that Koch is considering supporting Clinton, does that make her totally unpalatable to the Democrats?

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