Want a Purebred Dog? You Can Still Have One Through Adoption

It’s impossible to know exactly how many homeless animals there are in the world, but estimates lead us to believe the number is anywhere between 20,000,000 and 600,000,000. Out of these millions of homeless dogs, only one of every 10 dogs born will ever find a permanent home, either because they’re a stray or euthanized.

It’s estimated that 1.2 million dogs are euthanized per year in the United States. While many are euthanized because of illness or aggression, shelters are at constant risk for overcrowding and need to euthanize the least adoptable dogs in order to make room for more homeless animals. Many of these dogs are perfectly healthy and cleared for adoption.

Despite those numbers being in the millions, people still choose to support breeders rather than adopt. That doesn’t have to be the case, however.

While stray dogs make up the majority of dogs that are dropped off at shelters, not every shelter dog is a stray. In fact, 28 percent of the dogs that enter shelters are purebred and were purchased from a breeder. There are numerous reasons why this happens. Some of these dogs were given as gifts to homes that were not ready for a new family member. Other families don’t realize the work it takes to train a dog and give up. Other people have lifestyle changes – whether it’s a move or a significant other with allergies – that lead them to surrender their dog.

When these dogs are dropped off at the shelter, the organization’s website will be updated to include the dogs they have up for adoption. These listings almost always have the breed – or what the shelter employees think the breed is – listed, and many have a photo of the dog. If someone is looking for a particular type of dog, this saves them multiple trips to the shelter. They can just keep an eye on the website instead of visiting the shelter all the time.

If you want to get more specific and instant search results for the breed you want, Petfinder is a great resource. The adoption-only website works with adoption groups to give homeless animals a better chance at finding homes. The website doesn’t just include dogs, either. On Petfinder, users can search for cats, rabbits, horses, birds, pigs and more domesticated animals. The site is incredibly user friendly and allows potential adopters to refine their search to specific breeds and locations. You can even pick a desired age and gender. Chances are likely that the breed you’re looking for is at a rescue location less than 100 miles from your home.

Just as simple as Petfinder, you can also just type the name of the breed followed by the word “rescue” into the search bar. If you want to narrow down your options even further, type your location after “rescue” and see what kind of options pop up. The Internet has made many aspects in our lives easier, including finding your next best friend.

Photo Credit: Amy

178 comments

Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus3 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Sarah Hill
Sarah Hill3 years ago

thanks

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Quanta Kiran
Quanta Kiran3 years ago

noted

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Quanta Kiran
Quanta Kiran3 years ago

only adopt!

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Darla G.
Darla G3 years ago

The number of healthy, adoptable dogs (and cats) killed in the U.S. every day is atrocious. These are wonderful animals and all are worthy of a good life and to have the chance for that life snuffed out just because they were born into an overcrowded population is horrible. I cringe every time I find out that someone bought a puppy from a breeder or a pet store. I want to tell them that by doing that, they just killed a dog in a shelter. All 3 of my Yellow Labs have been adopted (I drove 533 miles round trip to get the most recent one, a 9 year old male). I had DNA testing done on the first Yellow Lab and it was “off the charts” purebred. I know from looking at the other 2 dogs that I’ve adopted that both of them are also 100% Lab. It wouldn’t matter if they were mixed with something else, by the way, as I’m not a purebred snob – it just happened that the dogs I wanted were part of the 28% of purebreds in shelters.

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STEFANIE RACKS
STEFANIE RACKS3 years ago

THANKS FOR SHARING.

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Nirvana Jaganath
Nirvana Jaganath3 years ago

Wish they'd tighten the laws to reduce backyard breeding or whatever it's called!

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Dt Nc
Dt Nc3 years ago

Danke

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Dt Nc
Dt Nc3 years ago

Danke

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Tetyana D.
Tetyana D3 years ago

Adopt don't shop.

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