Whale Watching is Awesome, Just Not Near These Islands

For the second time this season, anti-whaling advocates have stood watch this week to bear witness to the senseless slaughter of whales that continues to take place in the Faroe Islands every year.

Not unlike the dolphin drives that take place in Taiji, every year entire pods of whales and dolphins are rounded up, herded into bays and killed during a hunt known by the Faroese as the grindadráp, or the grind.

Anti-whaling advocates, including Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, have been working to end the controversial and senseless slaughter for decades and are back again this year to document the horror inflicted on cetaceans and try to save more from being killed.

Supporters continue to defend the killing as a community-based tradition that supplies food for residents, is regulated and done humanely, but witnesses argue it’s anything but quick and painless for the whales who suffer the stress of roundups and being mercilessly killed in front of their family members.

Following the deaths of 154 pilot whales earlier this season, this week Sea Shepherd estimates another 20 to 30 were killed. According to the organization, which just released graphic footage of the most recent slaughter, illegal killing methods were observed and the deaths were anything but quick.

While Sea Shepherd is there taking part in the organization’s sixth campaign in the area to protect pilot whales by trying to interfere and raise global awareness through for Operation Sleppid Grindini, this year they face another hurdle – a new law aimed at getting everyone involved whether they support what’s happening or not.

Not only have supporters continued to defend the grind, but in June lawmakers approved a measure that requires people, including tourists, to report sightings of whale and dolphin pods so they can be targeted for death, in addition to increasing penalties for those who try to interfere. Now anyone who fails to report a sighting can face arrest, prosecution, hefty fines and up to two years in jail.

“There is something truly sinister about a law that aims to silence those who fight to protect life, while protecting those engage in this blood-thirsty practice. It is this exactly this ominous state of affairs in the Faroe Islands that requires Sea Shepherd’s presence in the region,” said Captain Alex Cornelissen, CEO of Sea Shepherd Global and Operation Sleppid Grindini Campaign Leader.

Sea Shepherd has vowed to continue the battle to protect whales and dolphins through direct interference, along with local outreach and using global media to raise awareness about what’s happening, among other measures, in the Faroe Islands until the grind is stopped for good.

There’s no legitimate reason to continue killing these intelligent, social marine mammals en masse and there’s certainly no reason or excuse for continuing to hide behind tradition to inflict whatever harms we wish on other sentient creatures.

For more info on how to help, check out Sea Shepherd’s Operation Sleppid Grindini.

Photo credit: Ari Friedlaender

81 comments

Marija M
Marija M5 months ago

tks for sharing

SEND
JoAnn P
JoAnn Paris5 months ago

Petition signed.

SEND
Lesa D
Past Member 5 months ago

#205628 petition signed...

SEND
Lesa D
Past Member 5 months ago

thank you Alicia...

SEND
Glennis W
Glennis Whitney5 months ago

Petition signed and and shared Thank you for caring and sharing

SEND
Glennis W
Glennis Whitney5 months ago

So horrible Thank you for caring and sharing

SEND
Glennis W
Glennis Whitney5 months ago

Deplorable and sickening Thank you for caring and sharing

SEND
Glennis W
Glennis Whitney5 months ago

Great work Sea Shepard Thank you for caring and sharing

SEND
Clare O'Beara
Clare O5 months ago

th

SEND
Clare O'Beara
Clare O5 months ago

Good work Sea Shepherd.

SEND