Important Tips for Post Tooth Extraction Care

If you’ve just had a tooth extracted, then chances are that you’ll want to forget the whole ordeal ASAP. But don’t throw caution to the wind as soon as the procedure’s been performed: it’s actually in the post-extraction stage that you need to be most vigilant about your still-healing mouth.

We’ve compiled some of the most important tips about tooth extraction aftercare and recovery for you below, so read up, and you’ll be feeling good as new in no time!

1. Don’t do anything that might compromise the healing process

We’ll start with the “don’ts” of post-extraction care (and they’re pretty self-evident). Basically, you need to avoid vigorous mouth-rinsing, rough teeth-brushing, smoking or anything else that might affect the open clot that your extracted tooth has left exposed. You don’t want to prolong your pain, so lay off these habits for the duration of your recovery.

2. Keep it hygienic

If you want to know more about what not to do after having a tooth pulled, then bad hygiene would be at the top of said list. Because your extraction site is still raw and exposed to bacteria, the act of failing to clean the area according to your dentist’s recommendations will significantly compromise a quick recovery. It’s especially important to keep up with cleaning if you suffer from alveolar osteitis—a.k.a. “dry socket”—after your surgery, a common condition which can lead to increased pain if not treated and re-dressed daily.

3. Ice is your best friend

Ice packs and cold cloths are tried and true methods for alleviating many different kinds of bodily pain, and toothaches are no exception. Making sure that you’re well-stocked with all things chilly prior to your surgery will mean that, when you’re at home feeling a bit sorry for yourself afterwards, you’ll always have an instant method of pain-management at hand.

4. Implement a baby-food diet for a few days

Post-extraction, soft foods are the order of the day(s). Eating anything too solid—or, even worse, anything crunchy—will only add to your woes, so enjoy regressing back to your early childhood for a short spell, and stick to a diet of pudding, ice-cream and soup. Doesn’t sound too bad to us!

5. Make use of pain medication

Depending on how invasive your tooth extraction is, your doctor may prescribe specialised pain medication to give you a little chemical help in the days following surgery. Particularly if you’ve had a wisdom tooth extraction, it’s important to follow the doctor’s instructions to a T, taking the medication as and when you feel pain (but, of course, no more than strictly necessary). If you haven’t been prescribed anything specific, then anti-inflammatory shelf drugs like ibuprofen and aspirin work great.

6. Observe both sets of post-op recommendations (if given them)

Usually, your dentist will give you one set of instructions for the first day of your aftercare, and another for the remainder of the healing process. The first set of rules usually includes keeping the wound clean, having stitches removed and the like, whilst the second set will offer you guidance about salt rinses, stretching exercises and returning to semi-solid foods.

7. Be attentive to any complications that arise

Every so often, post-extraction issues like prolonged bleeding, bruising or even delayed reaction to anaesthetic can occur. You don’t need to be a hypochondriac, but it is worth objectively assessing your pain levels every now and then so as to realize when something’s not quite right with your extraction site. Contact your dentist if you’re experiencing severe symptoms—they’re the expert!

 

Based in Tauranga, New Zealand, Corson Dental is a modern dental practice specialising in cosmetic and general procedures. Visit corsondental.co.nz for more details.

Related:
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47 comments

Marie W
Marie W3 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Mike R
Mike R8 months ago

Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R8 months ago

Thanks

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Danuta Watola
Danuta W9 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Rosslyn O
Rosslyn O9 months ago

All very helpful advice thanks... I'm heading for a few removals and dentures sooner rather than later sadly.

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Chad A
Chad Anderson9 months ago

I really could have used this advice way back in elementary, junior high, and high school when I was getting a bunch of teeth pulled.

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Noted

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Winn A
Winn A9 months ago

Thanks

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Mary B
Mary B9 months ago

I would advise, especially if you're having multiple extractions at once, make up a couple quarts of smoothies with almond milk and some high quality food powders that contain dried fruits, veggies , whey powder, and some honey, a natural anti-biotic to be your food for a few days. Then buy a bottle of 'Mouth Balancing Solution' [Perelandra ltd.] well before hand to make yourself a gentle rinse in pure water. 2 or 3 droppers full to an 8oz bottle should be plenty then use that and nothing else. The idea here is NOT TO KILL the bacteria, but to bring it back into a healthy balance after the trauma of extraction. And when you order the Mouth Balancing stuff buy the Emergency Trauma Solution to address the pain. If you still need a pain killer do what you need, but I will say, your trauma circuitry needs to be on and strong for anything else to work to the best of it's potential. Trauma circuits on =healing quickly, less pain .

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Michele B
Michele B9 months ago

gonna need this advice pretty soon, thanx

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