Is Your Work Raising Your Diabetes Risk?

When people talk about occupational health and safety, you might think of job-related hazards like repetitive strain injuries or dangerous work sites. These days, progressive employers are recognizing stress at work is equally dangerous to employees’ health and well-being. Research is now revealing that stressful work can also raise your risk of diabetes.

We’re not talking about people who work in ice cream parlors or bakeries and spend too much time sampling the product. Specifically, researchers looked at women who regularly perform mentally tiring work and found that they were at a higher risk for developing diabetes. Published in the European Journal of Endocrinology, the study found that mentally tiring work raises the diabetes risk by 21 percent.

Researchers analyzed data from 73,517 women, most of whom were teachers. They found there was a higher type 2 diabetes risk for women with “very mentally tiring work” when compared to women with “little or no mentally tiring work.” The analysis also revealed that the diabetes risk was “independent of unhealthy lifestyle and traditional metabolic factors.”

According to the study conclusions, these observational results suggest the importance of taking into consideration the potential long-term metabolic impact of work-related stress for women working in a demanding environment. The researchers also concluded that increased support for such women should be investigated in intervention studies. While the study only assessed mentally tiring work on the effects of women, it may have the same effects on men.

If you have a stressful job, there are a number of things you can do to find greater balance in your life and reduce the burden or workplace demands. Here are a few:

Breathe deeply or meditate

Research in the medical journal Psychiatry Research shows that meditation affects the flow of blood to the brain and alters brain activity to be more relaxed.

Supplement with the stress vitamins

Supplement with a B-complex vitamin along with vitamin C since these nutrients are depleted during times of high stress and are needed to ward off stress-induced fatigue and to keep your immune system strong.

Say ‘no’

Trying to be a superhero by saying “yes” to everyone and every thing around you won’t help your stress levels. Learn to say “no” to social or other types of obligations that sap your strength.

Stop skipping meals

Skipping meals or going lengthy times without eating (more than a few hours) can cause your blood sugar levels to drop to unhealthy levels, which makes you feel more stressed-out, moody and irritable. Even a quick snack, particularly nuts or seeds can help regulate blood sugar levels.

Walk it off

Walking is therapeutic. I feel much more capable of handling the stresses I face when I go for a walk. The same is true for most people. If you can get outdoors to get some fresh air and a walk, I highly recommend it.

Get enough sleep

Sleep can help us rejuvenate and restore our capacity to deal with stress. If you’re having trouble sleeping, try using a high quality lavender essential oil in a carrier oil and rub onto your skin within an hour of bedtime to help you sleep.

If you have already been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or suspect you have its precursors, metabolic syndrome or syndrome X, there are many things you can do to improve your health, beginning with diet. That’s because diet is a great way to address type 2 diabetes.

Be sure to check out my blog, “Top 12 Foods to Eat if You Have Diabetes” to learn the research-proven foods that can help.

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Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM shares her food growing, cooking, preserving, and other food self-sufficiency adventures at FoodHouseProject.com. She is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: Be Your Own Herbalist: Essential Herbs for Health, Beauty, & Cooking. Follow her work.

 

 

47 comments

Leanne K
Leanne K18 days ago

The second healthy living article that I have read that doesn’t mention testing on animals or men and sex

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Leanne K
Leanne K18 days ago

Perhaps diabetes type 2 is caused by children or students but at least they didn’t test on animals or it wasn’t mentioned.

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Lisa M
Lisa M18 days ago

Thanks.

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Lisa M
Lisa M18 days ago

Thanks.

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Toni W
Toni W18 days ago

tyfs

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Toni W
Toni W18 days ago

tyfs

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Sherry Kohn
Sherry Kohn18 days ago

Many thanks to you !

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Jack Y
Jack Y18 days ago

thanks

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Jack Y
Jack Y18 days ago

thanks

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Diane E
Diane E18 days ago

Thanks for handy hints.

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