NYC Adds 500 Solar-Powered Food Carts This Summer

New York City’s 8,000+ food carts contribute significantly to the city’s pollution. But a pilot program hopes to reduce the GHG emissions emitted by these mobile polluters: the Big Apple will soon roll out a new breed of eco-friendly food carts.

Current Food Carts Are Polluters

The ubiquitous food cart gives hurried workers breakfast and lunch sustenance without the expense of a sit-down restaurant. But they often fall short when it comes to the environment. Most are big polluters, emitting more than their share of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike the emissions standards that were first developed for automobiles in 1970, pollution controls for small portable electric generators were only established by the U.S. EPA in 2000 (including the use of catalytic converters and other equipment). An independent analysis by Closed Loop Advisors, “Pollution Analysis of Converting New York City Food Trucks and Carts to Alternative Power Systems” revealed that a sampling of the smallest, most common 2 kilowatt (kW) gasoline generator (Honda EU2000i) used by street food vendors produced 42 times the current emissions standards for small (kW<8) generators. Multiply these by New York City’s estimated 8,000 mobile food carts and the environmental and health effects of these kitchens on wheels can significantly impact both residents and visitors.

New Breed of Mobile Food Cart

Enter the MRV100 food cart. Made by MOVE Systems, it’s packed with “green” technology and includes solar panels, rechargeable battery banks, a “federally certified heavy-duty fuel tank and low emission CNG” fuel system, a hybrid generator system, and a state-of-the-art mobile kitchen setup. Result: a food cart with a drastically reduced carbon footprint that cuts GHG emissions by 60% and virtually eliminates NOx pollution by 95%. Move Systems notes that the MRV100’s fuel system incorporates heavy-duty vehicle standards currently in commercial use. They’ve adapted hybrid car technology to replace noisy generators. Their solar, natural gas, and battery powered electrical system, engineered specifically for mobile food vending, cuts generator noise in half and reduces climate change emissions by over 66%.

Pilot Program with Incentives

MOVE Systems notes that the average cost of a food cart averages around $20,000. As an incentive, their pilot program will supply the first 500 food vendors who sign up with a MRV100 cart at no cost. Pilot program funds covering the cost of 500 free carts come from donations and private partnerships. As many as 100 carts are earmarked for disabled veterans. The Move Systems pilot program marks a significant investment in a cleaner, greener, street food ecosystem.

103 comments

Sue H
Sue H7 months ago

Bravo!

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Chen Boon Fook
Chen Boon Fook2 years ago

thanks for posting.

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Tin Ling L
Tin Ling L2 years ago

tyfs

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Chun Lai T
Chun Lai T2 years ago

Thank you for sharing!

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William C.
William C2 years ago

Thank you.

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