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What New Delhi's Free Clinics Can Teach America About Fixing Its Broken Health Care System


Science & Tech  (tags: health care, cost effective, Swasthya Slate, Health Cube, diagnostic device, India, Peru, new technology, free health care service, cloud data storage )

Evelyn
- 1184 days ago - washingtonpost.com
The technology that made the instant diagnosis possible was medical device called the Swasthya Slate. This $600 device, the size of a cake tin, performs 33 common medical tests & tests for certain diseases. Each test only takes a minute or two ...



   

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Comments

Darren Woolsey (218)
Thursday April 21, 2016, 3:25 am
Shared all over social media, to spread awareness, Evelyn.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Thursday April 21, 2016, 4:56 am
A couple of related links:
A video - Swasthya Slate (Public Health Foundation of India)

And a longer version of this article - Entrepreneurs everywhere can now solve the problems of humanity
 

Animae C (508)
Thursday April 21, 2016, 5:07 am
We have free clinics in Australia but not that fabulous new diagnostic machine, what a gem!!
"...performs 33 common medical tests including blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood haemoglobin, urine protein and glucose. And it tests for diseases such as malaria, dengue, hepatitis, HIV, and typhoid. Each test only takes a minute or two and the device uploads its data to a cloud-based medical-record management system that can be accessed by the patient."

Thanx Evelyn
 

Evelyn B (63)
Thursday April 21, 2016, 5:10 am
From the longer article:
"I was completely blown away with what I saw. The device performed medical tests, including blood and urine, within minutes for 1/100th of what we pay in the U.S. And it integrated into a patient management and AI-based diagnosis system designed for use by minimally-trained front-line health workers. In the one hour that I was there, I witnessed a woman’s life possibly having been saved."
---------------------------------
"All of this, including the medical tests, happened in 15 minutes. The entire process was automated — from check-in, to retrieval of medical records, to testing and analysis and ambulance dispatch. The hospital also received Kaur’s medical records electronically. There was no paperwork filled out, no bills sent to the patient or insurance company, no delay of any kind. Yes, it was all free."

--------------------------
"The Swasthya Slate costs only $600. It the size of a cake tin and performs 33 common medical tests including blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood hemoglobin, urine protein and glucose. It also tests for diseases such as malaria, dengue, hepatitis, HIV, and typhoid. Each test only takes a minute or two and the device uploads its data to a cloud-based medical-record management system that can be accessed by the patient.

This was developed by Kanav Kahol, who was a biomedical engineer and researcher at Arizona State University’s department of biomedical informatics until he became frustrated at the lack of interest by the U.S. medical establishment in reducing the cost of diagnostic testing. He worried that billions of people were getting no medical care or substandard care because of the medical industry’s motivation in keeping prices high. In 2011, he returned home to New Delhi to develop a solution."

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"When I go to my cardiologist for cholesterol tests, for example, he takes a large sample of my blood, sends it to the lab, and calls me back 2-3 days later with the results. And he charges my insurance company a couple of hundred dollars. With the Swasthya Slate they did the same test with a single drop of blood in five minutes—and gave me the results immediately. This cost Rs. 12, that is 18 cents."

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The potential to get affordable health care where it is most needed is enormous!

Imagine, for a moment:
Set up this programme in an area ....
Charge a nominal visit rate (say $10) to cover staff time, and $2 per test ... to be waived for those who can't afford it.
Once the (low) investment in equipment is covered (shouldn't take more than 6 months, probably less), donate 50% of profits for introduction of the same services in locations with inadequate health care access. This could be in the same state, another state, or in a developing country through a reliable NGO providing health care outreach ..... under conditions that they, too, "pay it on" within the capacity of their clients ..... Create a cascade effect .....
 

Past Member (0)
Friday April 22, 2016, 6:06 am
Wisdom to be respected
 

Mitchell D (82)
Friday April 22, 2016, 6:45 am
As soon as I read the title of this posting, I thought that medical/pharmaceutical establishment greed, here, was the sole reason America's "Broken Health Care System" won't go for this. And then we read about the frustration of Kanav Kahol, in Arizona!
"It may well be time for America to build mohalla clinics in its cities." Kudos to the Washington Post!!!
 

Mitchell D (82)
Friday April 22, 2016, 6:46 am
America's corporate short sightedness, an greed, may turn out to be its undoing!
 

Peggy B (43)
Friday April 22, 2016, 10:34 am
Excellent article.
 

Roger G (148)
Friday April 22, 2016, 1:11 pm
wonderful news, let us hope that America, Australia and the EU start using this tool for their homeless people which are millions !
 

Lois Jordan (63)
Friday April 22, 2016, 4:17 pm
Noted. Thanks for posting, Evelyn.

I'm afraid that until we get the "middlemen" (a.k.a. GREEDY for-profit health insurance companies) out of business, our health care is going to remain substandard and extremely expensive. But, this is a wonderful tool! Too bad that inventors have to move to other countries to market their inventions! Just grates on my last nerve.
 

Past Member (0)
Friday April 22, 2016, 6:59 pm
Thanks Evelyn,

"What New Delhi's Free Clinics Can Teach America About Fixing Its Broken Health Care System"

I see this kind of headline often 'Broken' this or that. The US H-care system is not broken: it's Rigged. It is not about an old system that became antiquated and broken from lack of flexibility, the truth is the system was designed from the beginning to benefit Insurance stock holders and other interests not dispense healthcare. The system is working just fine for the Health Insurance Companies and Health care providers that siphon money from Americans daily. To them, it functions perfectly according to plan. Read this excerpt from the article and weep:

"...however. When it comes to health care, the United States has many of the same problems as the developing world. Despite the Affordable Care Act, 33 million Americans or 10.4 percent of the U.S. population still lacks health insurance. These people are disproportionately poor, black or Hispanic, and 4.5 million are children. As a result, they receive less preventive care and suffer from more serious illness....

How much longer does this madness have to go on?

"All of this, including the medical tests, happened in 15 minutes at the Peeragarhi Relief Camp in New Delhi, India. The entire process was automated — from check-in, to retrieval of medical records, to testing and analysis and ambulance dispatch. The hospital also received Kaur’s medical records electronically. There was no paperwork filled out, no bills sent to the patient or insurance company, no delay of any kind. Yes, it was all free."

'Less than 15 minutes' - 'Less than 15 minutes' - 'Less than 15 minutes' - 'Less than 15 minutes' ............

"The technology that made the instant diagnosis possible at Peeragarhi was medical device called the "Swasthya Slate. This $600 device, the size of a cake tin, performs 33 common medical tests including blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood haemoglobin, urine protein and glucose. And it tests for diseases such as malaria, dengue, hepatitis, HIV, and typhoid. Each test only takes a minute or two and the device uploads its data to a cloud-based medical-record management system that can be accessed by the patient."

This devise is brilliant and very inexpensive and the Indian system is very efficient. The antithesis of US health care.
 

Winn A (179)
Saturday April 23, 2016, 7:14 am
Thanks Evelyn!
 
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