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Ahed Tamimi: 'I Am a Freedom Fighter. I Will Not Be the Victim'


World  (tags: Human Rights, Palestine, Israel, Nabi Saleh, Ahed Tamimi, international law, occupation, truth, fear, resistance, non-violent resistance, ethics, freedoms )

Evelyn
- 262 days ago - theguardian.com
Her international recognition infuriated the Israeli government, Ahed said."They are afraid of the truth. If they were not wrong, they would not be afraid of the truth. They always fear the truth, they are the occupier, and we are under occupation."



   

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Comments

Evelyn B (63)
Tuesday July 31, 2018, 11:57 pm
See Italian Artist Was Arrested After Painting a Giant Mural of Palestinian Ahed Tamimi about the Italian artists' arrest

And see the Israeli paper, Haaretz's article:
Haaretz - Ahed Tamimi's Attorney: Eight Months in Prison Didn't Break Her
 

Peggy B (43)
Wednesday August 1, 2018, 4:38 pm
I am afraid for her.
 

MmAway M (522)
Wednesday August 1, 2018, 9:38 pm
Ok Taking a peek dear... Yes, I noted...but to tired to read right now and wanted to get a bit of this out there...Hope you don't mind my copy/paste ~ Just a wee bit of your news @ site...Yes, you caught my interest here!

"The teenage Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi has said she used her eight months in prison as an opportunity to study international law and hopes to one day lead cases against Israel in international courts.

“God willing, I will manage to study law,” the 17-year-old from Nabi Saleh in the occupied West Bank told the Guardian a day after her . “I will present the violations against the Palestinians in criminal courts. And to try Israel for it and to be a big lawyer, and to return rights to my country.”

Tamimi, who rose to global prominence as a child living under military occupation, said she and other Palestinians in her all-female prison unit would sit for hours and learn legal texts. “We managed to transform the jail into a school,” she said."
 

Lona G (66)
Wednesday August 1, 2018, 10:13 pm
I hope Ahed's actions will keep her out of harm's way and not lead to a life of harassment, arrests and imprisonment like so many other Palestinians fighting for their freedom have to endure. I know she needs to tread very careful and keep her temper in check, but she can do so much more at "liberty" tha from behind bars.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Thursday August 2, 2018, 12:01 am
Although her activism is very valuable, I do hope that she and her family decide to take advantage of one of the offers of a place at a university abroad. She'd be able to develop skills that she could then apply in Palestine, and it would also give her a time in security - but even that might have its own risks; the Israelis might well find a way to block her return.
 

Shirley S (187)
Friday August 3, 2018, 8:17 pm
She has matured in the way she thinks.
 

fly b (26)
Friday August 3, 2018, 9:29 pm
Interview
Ahed Tamimi: 'I am a freedom fighter. I will not be the victim' .

Oliver Holmes and Sufian Taha in Nabi Saleh.

Day after her release, teenage Palestinian activist says she hopes to become lawyer and lead cases against Israel.

The teenage Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi has said she used her eight months in prison as an opportunity to study international law and hopes to one day lead cases against Israel in international courts.

“God willing, I will manage to study law,” the 17-year-old from Nabi Saleh in the occupied West Bank told the Guardian a day after her release. “I will present the violations against the Palestinians in criminal courts. And to try Israel for it and to be a big lawyer, and to return rights to my country.”

Tamimi, who rose to global prominence as a child living under military occupation, said she and other Palestinians in her all-female prison unit would sit for hours and learn legal texts. “We managed to transform the jail into a school,” she said.

To an outcry from rights groups, the teenager was arrested in December after slapping and kicking Israeli soldiers on camera outside her home. The soldiers had been deployed at one of Nabi Saleh’s weekly protests, where residents have thrown stones at troops who have responded with teargas, arrests and, at times, live ammunition.

She later accepted a deal in court to plead guilty to assault, incitement and two counts of obstructing soldiers.

Palestinian 16-year-old Ahed Tamimi is the latest child victim of Israel’s occupation

“The experience of being arrested was really hard. As much as I try, I cannot describe it,” Ahed said. But she added: “This experience added value to my life, maybe it made me more mature. More conscious.”

Her trial was held behind closed doors. Concerns about her treatment in detention were raised after a video emerged in which a male Israeli interrogator threatened the then 16-year-old, commenting on her body and “eyes of an angel”.

Ahed said her treatment was not unusual. “It was not the first, and it was not a coincidence. This is their style of interrogating,” she said.

Her case has highlighted the arrest and detention of what local human rights groups say are more than 300 Palestinian minors.

Ahed said her experience in jail helped with her ambitions to become an international lawyer. “For example, I was under interrogation. There were violations against me. International law says that this should not happen to me,” she said, adding that in another life she would have trained to be a professional footballer.

Nabi Saleh is populated almost exclusively by members of her extended family and is a focus of the anti-occupation movement. Images or videos of Ahed throughout her childhood, often grappling with or staring down soldiers during village protests, have gone viral.

After gaining worldwide attention, the Tamimi family say their daughter has been offered scholarships to study at a university abroad but that she is still deciding.

The Palestinian government has launched several international complaints against Israel, including for alleged war crimes and what it says is a system of governance that amounts to apartheid. Israel has vehemently denied the allegations.

Ahed’s family home is filled with activists and Palestinian officials, who sit drinking coffee in small paper cups on plastic stools outside. Within hours of her release, the teenager met the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas. Two Italian artists were arrested for painting a mural of Ahed’s face of the Israel separation barriers that divides the Palestinian territories.

Her international recognition infuriated the Israeli government, Ahed said. “They are afraid of the truth. If they were not wrong, they would not be afraid of the truth. The truth scares them. And I managed to deliver this truth to the world. And of course, they’re afraid how far I reached. They always fear the truth, they are the occupier, and we are under occupation.”

Some in Israel believe the focus on and arrest of the teenager was a self-defeating move for the country, while others have praised the soldiers’ apparent restraint and have accuse Nabi Saleh residents of provocations.

Ahed has no regrets about the day she hit the solider, a man she believed had earlier that day shot her 15-year-old cousin in the head with a rubber bullet during a clash.

She was reunited with her cousin upon release and he was at her home on Monday, a large scar marking his face.

But fame has also taken a toll on a girl who was seen as a local hero before she was in secondary school. “I feel proud that became a symbol for the Palestinian cause in order to deliver the message of Palestinian to the whole world. Of course, it is a heavy burden on me. It’s true; it’s a big responsibility. But I am totally confident that I am for of it.”

For now, she hopes for a little rest and to decide her next steps, still enjoying the high of leaving prison. “At last, I saw the sky without a fence. I can walk on the street without handcuffs. I can see the stars, the moon. I haven’t seen them for a long time and now I am with my family.”

Yet her 22-year-old brother, Wa’ed Tamimi, is in prison awaiting a sentence for his involvement in confrontations with soldiers. And the conflict is never far away. An Israeli military outpost and settlement can be seen from the garden where she speaks.

“I’m not the victim of the occupation,” Ahed said. “The Jew or the settler child who carries a rifle at the age of 15, they are the victims of the occupation. For me, I am capable of distinguishing between right and wrong. But not him. His view is clouded. His heart is filled with hatred and scorn against the Palestinians. He is the victim, not me. I always say I am a freedom fighter. So I will not be the victim.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/30/ahed-tamimi-i-am-a-freedom-fighter-i-will-not-be-the-victim-palestinian-israel

Thank you for sharing, this update, Evelyn.

Your comment makes important points. Ahed's safety is paramount, and, the Israeli state could, well, try and stop her, returning to her home and family, if she leaves.

As they have with others.
 

fly b (26)
Friday August 3, 2018, 10:16 pm
Ahed Tamimi is Free But Hundreds of Palestinian Children are Still in Israeli Prisons (VIDEOS)

The Palestine Chronicle congratulates the Palestinian people and the Tamimi family on the release of teenage protest icon, Ahed Tamimi. It also reminds its readers and supporters of Palestinian rights everywhere that hundreds of Palestinian children continue to be imprisoned and are often tortured by their Israeli jailers.

Also, we must all keep in mind that nearly 7,000 Palestinian prisoners are held in Israeli jails, many of whom are imprisoned without trial (the so-called ‘administrative detention’), and almost all of them go through the customary weeks of torture.

According to a report by the Israeli rights group, B’tselem,
“At the end of May 2018, 291 Palestinian minors were held in Israeli prisons as security detainees and prisoners, including 3 administrative detainees. Another 6 Palestinian minors were held in Israel Prison Service facilities for being in Israel illegally. The IPS considers these minors – both detainees and prisoners – criminal offenders. In addition, a small number of minors are held in IDF-run facilities for short periods of time.”

According to a joint report published by B’tselem and HaMoked, Israeli forces violate Palestinian children’s rights as a matter of state policy.

The report states:
“Rather it is a case of a plain and clear policy followed by the various authorities: the police who carry out the arrests; the IPS (Israel Prison Service) which keeps the boys incarcerated in harsh conditions; and finally, the courts, where judges virtually automatically extend the boys’ custodial remand.”

Indeed, prosecution of Palestinian children in Israeli military courts is systematic.

According to a report released by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC),

“Israel is the only country in the world that systematically prosecutes children in military courts – between 500 and 700 each year. The Israel Prison Service revealed that an average of 204 Palestinian children have been held in custody every month since 2012.”

Most of those children are accused of throwing stones as heavily-armed Israeli occupation soldiers.

Child detention in Palestine is a “system of control”, violating the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) art. 37(c); the CRC General Comment No. 10, para 89; the UN Standard Minimum Rules, rules 33 and 34; Tokyo Rules, rule 64.

According to UNICEF, international law stipulates that,

“Children should be restrained only if they pose an imminent threat to themselves or to others, and all other means have been exhausted, or as a precaution against escape during transfer, but in all cases, only for as long as is strictly necessary.”

60% of Palestinian children arrested by Israel were verbally, physically or psychologically tortured, according to the Palestinian Prisoners’ Club (PPC).

Many of the imprisoned children are also subjected to medical negligence, as in the case of teenage boy Hassan Tamimi, who lost his eyesight, because Israel did not allow the youth access to his medication. Hassan suffers from liver and kidney issues as a result of protein malabsorption since early childhood.

(PalestineChronicle.com)

http://www.palestinechronicle.com/ahed-tamimi-is-free-but-hundreds-of-palestinian-children-are-still-in-israeli-prisons-videos/
 

fly b (26)
Saturday August 4, 2018, 11:13 am
Tamimi’s Mother: Support for Ahed Is Based on Racism
August 4, 2018

She explained:
Ahed Tamimi’s mother said that the media attention and worldwide solidarity that her daughter received following her arrest by Israeli occupation forces was rooted in racism.

“In fact one journalist wrote in Haaretz once on why they sympathized with Ahed when they were trying to arrest me once; they arrested me and she was crying. It’s because they felt that she looked like them, she said. So perhaps the world showed more solidarity because she looks like their children, but all Palestinian children are Ahed Tamimi.”

She added:


“There are thousands of stories that the media needs to pay attention to and highlight all of the occupation’s crimes, because the occupation needs to be seen as the war crime it is and legal measures need to be taken to that effect.”

http://www.palestinechronicle.com/tamimis-mother-support-for-ahed-is-based-on-racism/
 

fly b (26)
Saturday August 4, 2018, 11:22 am
Ahed Tamimi Is Free, but 400 More Palestinian Children Remain in Military Jails.

http://www.care2.com/news/member/124335883/4114297
 

fahad Al fahad (140)
Sunday August 5, 2018, 4:45 pm
We bless her freedom! We wish freedom to the rest of the oppressed prisoners in Israeli jails! And to complete its struggle against the Zionist occupier
 
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