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Worker Advocate: Nation's Biggest Industry Fostering Low Wage, Low Benefit Workplace


Business  (tags: minimum wage, food stamps, employee benefits, food industry, corporate, ethics )

Lynn
- 2292 days ago - commondreams.org
... co-executive director of Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United ... Jayaraman appeared on Up with Chris Hayes on Saturday and brought to light some of conditions that leave food industry workers forced to work sick and rely on food stamps. ...



   

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Comments

Lynn Squance (235)
Saturday March 9, 2013, 1:11 pm
"Urging the need for some guaranteed minimum wage to provide a livable standard, Jayaraman remarked: "Right now, food service workers use food stamps at double the rate of the rest of the U.S. workforce and suffer poverty rate of three times the rest of the workforce."

The minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13, a rate, Jayaraman noted, that has been at this level for 22 years."

With a server making $2.13/hr plus tips, it is a wonder that any restaurant in the US has serving staff. Companies complain about the growing food stamp problem and the need to cut that 'expense' from the budget, but they are part of the problem.

Wake up!
 

Kit B (276)
Saturday March 9, 2013, 1:28 pm

So true, we do not openly speak up to the issues. I was in a restaurant with my nephew on Thursday and the waitress mentioned that she had worked there for 7 years. She is used for training and opening other restaurants, and she finally made to $3.00 per hour, but when told she had to move to East Texas she declined the offer. Her pay was cut to $2.50 for non compliance. (they were not offering to pay her moving expenses) We did leave a note on the check, one that did not address the waitress as an individual, rather the company policies.

If it were still true that you get what you pay for, then would any one be forced to work or serve food while ill? Do any of us want a side portion of Flu with our salad?
 

Johann Scheffler (120)
Sunday March 10, 2013, 4:21 am
Most retail and hospitality positions are designed with public assistance in mind to supplement the poor wages and benefits of their employees. The lofty salaries of upper management are based on depriving the lower level workers of a living wage, such as by Walmart, Home Depot, Target, etc. The average worker, or even supervisor, for Home Depot exists at the poverty level and the only oneswho don't are those who have spouses with better jobs or have separate business or retirement income.
 

Kerrie G (116)
Monday March 11, 2013, 5:43 am
Noted, thanks.
 

Dorothy N (63)
Monday March 11, 2013, 8:55 pm
There are many of THE SAME RESTAURANTS (such as Taco Bell and Red Lobster, among many others) in Canada as are in the States, paying the full Canadian wage here.

If these businesses can't afford to pay full minimum wage to employees, why open franchises in places where they have to?
 

Gene J (288)
Thursday March 14, 2013, 6:13 am
"Urging the need for some guaranteed minimum wage to provide a livable standard, Jayaraman remarked: "Right now, food service workers use food stamps at double the rate of the rest of the U.S. workforce and suffer poverty rate of three times the rest of the workforce."

The minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13, a rate, Jayaraman noted, that has been at this level for 22 years."

It has been ever thus. Most places also hire only part time workers so they don't have to pay ANY benefits. This works for college students, maybe, but is still ridiculous and was 40 years ago when I was in college. This is an industry that is so far behind the times it is practically prehistoric.
 
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