START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
 
 
This thread is displayed with the most recent posts first.
 January 13, 2011 4:54 PM

To replace all the beef, mutton, pork and chicken

Why would you try to do that? Would you only eat lentils if they could replace every other vege you eat?

Wild animal meat is not a significant source of meat in any country and never will be.

You sure about that? What about fish?

Humans have shown that they cannot hunt any animal sustainably on a commercial scale.

Actually, we are showing the opposite.

The kangaroo population has dropped by over 60% since 2002.

Where did you get this number from? Most species of roo that we eat have far higher populations than at the time of European settlement.

Those who support the killing of kangaroos accuse opponents as being hypocritical if they eat other kinds of meat, but they also accuse us of being extreme if we are vegan.

I guess you can't be both.

I am vegan and do not think that I should just leave others alone to go on with the killing.

I think you should.

Australia has an economy which is based on the destruction of forests

How many places do you know of where old growth logging still occurs?

It is amazing that supporters of kangaroo killing use Aboriginals as an excuse

Who does?

People who want a low-fat meat should simply eat less.

So you support them eating roo meat?

It is crazy to overeat, and then try to think of ways of using up energy in order to lose weight

It is natural for human to do a lot of hard physical work. Sitting on a couch all day rationing lentils to yourself is not natural.

Those who complain that vegans are "imposing their values on others" obviously seem to have no problems with the ridicule and bullying that not only vegans and vegetarians but even "animal lovers" often have to put uo with at school, work and by relatives.

Perhaps you should stop trying to impose your values on them.

Vegans should not have to prove that they can live without meat

No-one is trying to force you to eat meat. You are the one trying to force others to eat what you want.

the onus should be on those who claim not to be able to live without eating meat

And you wonder why everyone ridicules you.

It is meat, and not veganism, that should be regarded as a "special request"

No. Meat is a natural part of the human diet. You are trying to impose your unnatural behaviour on others.

In the 21 years that I lived in Australia, I did not see one kangaroo in the wild.

Is this because you were sitting on a couch all day rationing lentils to yourself?  [ send green star]
 
I cannot delete my first comment January 13, 2011 1:32 AM

I would like to delete my first comment (Tuesday, 9:20 PM) because it did not format correctly.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Kangaroo meat could never replace the "usual" farmed animal meat January 13, 2011 1:24 AM

Kangaroo meat could never replace the "usual" farmed animal meat because the population of kangaroos multiplied by the yield of meat per kangaroo is too small. To replace all the beef, mutton, pork and chicken that is eaten in Australia each year would require a population of over one billion kangaroos. Due to their method of locomotion and stress, which can cause death, kangaroos cannot be farmed.

Wild animal meat is not a significant source of meat in any country and never will be. Humans have shown that they cannot hunt any animal sustainably on a commercial scale. The overfishing of world oceans illustrates that. Over 80% of the oceans are overfished. The kangaroo population has dropped by over 60% since 2002.

Those who support the killing of kangaroos accuse opponents as being hypocritical if they eat other kinds of meat, but they also accuse us of being extreme if we are vegan. I am vegan and do not think that I should just leave others alone to go on with the killing. There are all kinds of hypocritical values that others expect me to abide by (such as refusing to go to school or work; bans on walking on "private property", making loud noise, swearing, nudity, and so on) so I do not see why anti-vegans see it as such a problem when we advocate veganism.

No government should be subsidizing animal killing industries or commercial fishing. If the Government of Australia were serious about protecting the environment, they would not be trying to double the human population by rewarding people for having children nor would immigration agents be luring people to come to Australia. Australia has an economy which is based on the destruction of forests, the killing of animals, the burning of fossil fuels, and urban sprawl. Kangaroos should not pay the price.

It is amazing that supporters of kangaroo killing use Aboriginals as an excuse but, at the same time, they continue to live on land that was stolen from Aboriginals. Of course, they conveniently ignore the fact that the present human population of Australia is about 100 times the Aboriginal population at the time of the white colonization. Not all Aboriginals support the killing of kangaroos and 8 Aborigional protesters were arrested in Canberra in 2008.

People who want a low-fat meat should simply eat less. It is crazy to overeat, and then try to think of ways of using up energy in order to lose weight, and still claim to be concerned about world hunger and/or the environment. Those who complain that vegans are "imposing their values on others" obviously seem to have no problems with the ridicule and bullying that not only vegans and vegetarians but even "animal lovers" often have to put uo with at school, work and by relatives. Vegans should not have to prove that they can live without meat; the onus should be on those who claim not to be able to live without eating meat. It is meat, and not veganism, that should be regarded as a "special request" or a luxury (for example, whilst in hospital, prison, school camp, the army ... ).

Kangaroos manage their own population and do not need to be killed. In the 21 years that I lived in Australia, I did not see one kangaroo in the wild.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Kangaroo meat could never replace farmed animal meat January 11, 2011 9:20 PM

Kangaroo meat could never replace the "usual" farmed animal meat because the population of kangaroos multiplied by the yield of meat per kangaroo is too small. To replace all the beef, mutton, pork and chicken that is eaten in Australia each year would require a population of over one billion kangaroos. Due to their method of locomotion and stress, which can cause death, kangaroos cannot be farmed. Wild animal meat is not a significant source of meat in any country and never will be. Humans have shown that they cannot hunt any animal sustainably on a commercial scale. The overfishing of world oceans illustrates that. Over 80% of the oceans are overfished. The kangaroo population has dropped by over 60% since 2002. Those who support the killing of kangaroos accuse opponents as being hypocritical if they eat other kinds of meat, but they also accuse us of being extreme if we are vegan. I am vegan and do not think that I should just leave others alone to go on with the killing. There are all kinds of hypocritical values that others expect me to abide by (such as refusing to go to school or work; bans on walking on "private property", making loud noise, swearing, nudity, and so on) so I do not see why anti-vegans see it as such a problem when we advocate veganism. No government should be subsidizing animal killing industries or commercial fishing. If the Government of Australia were serious about protecting the environment, they would not be trying to double the human population by rewarding people for having children nor would immigration agents be luring people to come to Australia. Australia has an economy which is based on the destruction of forests, the killing of animals, the burning of fossil fuels, and urban sprawl. Kangaroos should not pay the price. It is amazing that supporters of kangaroo killing use Aboriginals as an excuse but, at the same time, they continue to live on land that was stolen from Aboriginals. Of course, they conveniently ignore the fact that the present human population of Australia is about 100 times the Aboriginal population at the time of the white colonization. Not all Aboriginals support the killing of kangaroos and 8 Aborigional protesters were arrested in Canberra in 2008. People who want a low-fat meat should simply eat less. It is crazy to overeat, and then try to think of ways of using up energy in order to lose weight, and still claim to be concerned about world hunger and/or the environment. Those who complain that vegans are "imposing their values on others" obviously seem to have no problems with the ridicule and bullying that not only vegans and vegetarians but even "animal lovers" often have to put uo with at school, work and by relatives. Vegans should not have to prove that they can live without meat; the onus should be on those who claim not to be able to live without eating meat. It is meat, and not veganism, that should be regarded as a "special request" or a luxury (for example, whilst in hospital, prison, school camp, the army, and so on). Kangaroos manage their own population and do not need to be killed. In the 21 years that I lived in Australia, I did not see one kangaroo in the wild.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 04, 2011 4:27 PM

No thanks. Eating meat is natural and healthy. 

 [ send green star]
 
Ben Franklin was a vegetarian January 03, 2011 11:05 AM

Ben Franklin was a vegetarian.  read his autobiography.

Here's some more of them, vegans in Australia:

  http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGdUpvHCJNnU4BWSVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE1c2MyOG5uBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1ZJUDA0NF8xOTI-/SIG=11svaoas4/EXP=1294167535/**http%3a//veganmuffinprincess.blogspot.com/

http://vegan.meetup.com/cities/au/sydney/

http://www.rawandvegan.com/

http://funkeyforest.com/

http://mangodurian.blogspot.com/2008/01/b12-on-raw-vegan-diet-mostly-fruitarian.html

http://raw-vegan.meetup.com/

http://www.abolitionist-online.com/08_conscious_choice.shtml

http://www.greenpeople.org/listing/Vegan-Australian-17896.cfm

Let's get with Ben's program, shan't we?



This post was modified from its original form on 03 Jan, 11:06  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 02, 2011 3:58 PM

Why kill animals to make clothing, to eat, when a more healthful and humane alternative exists?

So you don't have to wear shooes made of vegetables.

No vegan products need be made of carcinogens.  

Oxygen is carcinogenic.

And grease from real dead animal food products is definitely poisonous, as I have nearly died of it in the past

Did you fall into a vat of it or something?  [ send green star]
 
 January 02, 2011 3:39 PM

I have a hemp wallet in my pocket.  This is an ancient fibre used in clothing and linen.  I drink hemp milk to cream my coffee, tea and other beverages.  My Asics walking shoes are not made of any animal products.  Other shoe companies such as New Balance have lines made of all vegan products which are then sold by vegan retailers.  Why kill animals to make clothing, to eat, when a more healthful and humane alternative exists?  Those that make a profit on the raising and killing of animals can make a profit on vegan alternatives instead.  No vegan products need be made of carcinogens.  But the tanning in leather need not be poisonous. And grease from real dead animal food products is definitely poisonous, as I have nearly died of it in the past, and most everyone else in the world does die of it.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 02, 2011 3:43 AM

Adam, don't you think 'all natural' is the way to go with clothes? Who wants to wear carcinogenic products derived from fossil fuels?

 [ send green star]
 
 January 01, 2011 12:00 PM

Wow, this thread is almost seven years old.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 01, 2011 11:54 AM

This carnage against all animals must end. Use and buy only faux leather, that is manmade materials in shoes, belts and clothing. Eat only veggie-meats.  Adopt permaculture sustainability business concepts, to shift green the way Interface, Inc. has done.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interface,_Inc.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 December 10, 2010 1:48 AM

The laws have now been signed off by the governator:

http://www.ozpolitic.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1179303108/13#13

 [ send green star]
 
 April 22, 2008 7:51 PM

California has legalised kangaroo products, but there has been a media blackout. It is not showing up on google. Please note this news article and help get the word out:

http://www.care2.com/news/member/177762681/718827

More info:

http://www.ozpolitic.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1203549919/4#4

 [ send green star]
 
 August 26, 2007 6:54 PM

Wow, just the sort of intelligent criticism you expect from the extremist animal libbers.  [ send green star]
 
 August 25, 2007 9:59 PM

your a fool  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 August 10, 2007 10:45 PM

If there's anything in particular you want me to back up, just ask. Most of what I've posted here lately is pointing out the nonsense in your posts.  [ send green star]
 
roo meat August 10, 2007 10:32 PM

This is great! you could not back up any of your BS, all u could come up with was paying me out. little advice, GET OFF YOUR HIGH HORSE, u ain't got a leg to stand on!  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 August 10, 2007 7:21 PM

ok why dont u think it would not whipe out the species??  if roo hunting became comercial, every night families of roo`s would be getting split up

News flash, it already is commercial, and they are not getting wiped out, despite the fact that 'families are getting split up'

thats becus u only think of them as food, if u could comprehend that they are living feeling loving animals, you would NOT ACCEPT IT

Don't put words in my mouth. I understand they are living feeling animals. I still accept it.

not untill  like 200 years ago, rape on slaves (women) was total exceptable. gosh am i talking to a man or a child that likes to kill.?.

So you're saying that rape has not always been accetpable? Are you trying to make some kind of point here?

wat bs, have u gone to an abitwah (how ever its spelt). i was talking about how animals are killed for mass sloughter.

So you weren't talking about roos at all. Thought so. Do try to stay on topic, it gets confusing when your mind wanders.

i am ineceptable of reasoning

I agree with your self diagnosis, however poorly spelt.

 [ send green star]
 
 August 10, 2007 6:45 PM

me-that would whipe out the whole species

No it wouldn't. That's absurd.  ... me-ok why dont u think it would not whipe out the species??  if roo hunting became comercial, every night families of roo`s would be getting split up( big roos killed & taken away, joeys hop away and die becus they can not fend for them selfs in the wild) if this was comercial and allowed, then this would be happening 100x fold. so how do u think u can reason for that?   after time, it will knock out species of roo`s, after a long time it will clear them out. SERIOSLY THINK ABOUT IT

me-the way they are being hunted (not farmed) now is unecptable

youI accept it.    me-thats becus u only think of them as food, if u could comprehend that they are living feeling loving animals, you would NOT ACCEPT IT

these families die after the main leaders are killed

---The fate of orphaned young, too small to be of any commercial value to hunters, is equally grim. ‘In pouch’ joeys of shot mothers are either decapitated (if very small) or killed with a blow to the head. Dependant ‘at foot’ joeys often escape, and suddenly face a life alone, often falling victim to predators, exposure or starvation. The mother and joey bond is immensely strong. Red kangaroos are not weaned until a year after birth and Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroos are not weaned until they are nearly 18 months old. It is estimated that 300,000 ‘at foot’ joeys die each year. Aside from the obvious welfare problems, this annual slaughter is also putting the future of this unique species at risk. A two year investigation of the industry presented evidence that, the annual hunt is seriously affecting the future viability of the kangaroo populations targeted by shooters.---

ok so rape on women was fine for hundreds of years

When was rape considered fine?  so who here has lived a shaded life... did u go to school? like dah. not untill  like 200 years ago, rape on slaves (women) was total exceptable. gosh am i talking to a man or a child that likes to kill.?.

they are sat in pens that smell of death for days untill forced into death

What are you talking about? Kangaroos? You have been reading some serious BS.  wat bs, have u gone to an abitwah (how ever its spelt). i was talking about how animals are killed for mass sloughter.

me-but u hunt and are not afraid to take lives, thats what makes u bias.

you-No it doesn't. That doesn't make any sense.

me-it makes total sense, if u are trying to force an idea, you can not have any of your own opinions about the subject!  u being a hunter and proud of it puts u in no possition to to make dicisions about it. your opinion is bias.  

me-so all you can come up with is targeting me personaly, whats next my spelling

You- youre the one targetting personal issues. You say you cannot reason with someone unless they agree with you. To me that says loud and clear that you are the one incapable of reasoning.

me-yes in this case, i am ineceptable of reasoning becus u are goin around spreading this idea to people with no facts to back it up!  all u have done in this last massage is target me personaly which obviusly u have nothing other that pure evil to back u up.



 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 August 10, 2007 4:52 PM

me-that would whipe out the whole species

No it wouldn't. That's absurd.

the way they are being hunted (not farmed) now is unecptable

I accept it.

these families die after the main leaders are killed

Another absurdity.

ok so rape on women was fine for hundreds of years

When was rape considered fine?

they are sat in pens that smell of death for days untill forced into death

What are you talking about? Kangaroos? You have been reading some serious BS.

but u hunt and are not afraid to take lives, thats what makes u bias

No it doesn't. That doesn't make any sense.

me-so all you can come up with is targeting me personaly, whats next my spelling

Youa re the one targetting personal issues. You say you cannot reason with someone unless they agree with you. To me that says loud and clear that you are the one incapable of reasoning.

 [ send green star]
 
 August 10, 2007 4:27 AM

you-I imagine it would be more like managing wild fisheries. They would be harvested the same way they are now. me-that would whipe out the whole species. would u take the males, females, and what would u do with the babies?  the way they are being hunted (not farmed) now is unecptable, these families die after the main leaders are killed, so what do u thing will happen ten fold in different earias.

me-this
animal is our icon so what? but you would act the same if some alien came to give you a pat! ..you-You really think I'd try to kill an alien that approached me? You watch too much TV. me-yes i dont think ET would be anything like it (maybe your the one with too much tv time) if u or anyone came in contact with a creature u have never seen before and it tryed to touch u, god dam u would fight it off, i said nothing about trying to kill you.

me-seriosly i do not think you are in any possition to suggest such a hainest crime. you-It is not a crime. It is part of our society. Always has been. Always will be.
me-ok so rape on women was fine for hundreds of years considered a part of everyday life, but does that mean its OK? ?

you-The only thing that has changed is that few people see it because they pay others to do it for them. This has lead to some oddly hypocritical and silly notions about what is acceptable. me-well i am one of those silly people but  becus u already are bias about this issue u can not understand why we fight this issue of mass sloughter ( abitwahs) . but hey ill try explain, the reason we are so against it. the standards these animals are killed is discusting all animals. they are sat in pens that smell of death for days untill forced into death. they used to get stunned b4 being stabbed in the head but the fab johnny f**king howard has just said its ok for them to not have to be stunned, those 4+ seconds oh dieing in pain apparently is ok, i just wonder how long those seconds would seen to him. + many more reasons! trust me.

me- if you, your self are a proud carnivore and hunter, your decitions are already bias -you-Biased by eating a natural diet? Hardly. me- yer i do agree but i was hardly targeting u about the diet,  but u hunt and are not afraid to take lives, thats what makes u bias.

me-till u come to realise that hunting is a uneceptable act, there will be no reasoning in your decisions! ..you-You got that backwards.... me-so all you can come up with is targeting me personaly, whats next my spelling....
 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 August 10, 2007 4:04 AM

then how do u sudgest farming them?

I imagine it would be more like managing wild fisheries. They would be harvested the same way they are now.

this animal is our icon

so what?

but you would act the same if some alien came to give you a pat!

You really think I'd try to kill an alien that approached me? You watch too much TV.

seriosly i do not think you are in any possition to suggest such a hainest crime

It is not a crime. It is part of our society. Always has been. Always will be. The only thing that has changed is that few people see it because they pay others to do it for them. This has lead to some oddly hypocritical and silly notions about what is acceptable.

if you, your self are a proud carnivore and hunter, your decitions are already bias

Biased by eating a natural diet? Hardly.

till u come to realise that hunting is a uneceptable act, there will be no reasoning in your decisions!

You got that backwards.

 [ send green star]
 
roo August 10, 2007 3:59 AM

then how do u sudgest farming them?

this animal is our icon, it is amizing and harmless.. yer dah any wild animal you get up close too would be on the deffence but you would act the same if some alien came to give you a pat!

seriosly i do not think you are in any possition to suggest such a hainest crime. if you, your self are a proud carnivore and hunter, your decitions are already bias. i would not trust any influencial decision you could make about animals.

till u come to realise that hunting is a uneceptable act, there will be no reasoning in your decisions!
 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 August 09, 2007 7:00 PM

the kangaroo is one of the most harmless animals on the earth

Hove you ever met a wild roo up close?

the kangaroo yes would be better for our soil and the environment, but the kangaroo should be a protected animal and not used for slaughter

That would defeat the purpose. Protecting kangaroos would encourage cattle farming.

to farm this animal for meat would be a crime against society

I am not suggesting we farm them like we do cattle.

 [ send green star]
 
roo meat August 09, 2007 5:38 PM

you have got this so wrong dude! the kangaroo yes would be better for our soil and the environment, but the kangaroo should be a protected animal and not used for slaughter. the kangaroo is one of the most harmless animals on the earth, it is a better parent then humans could ever dream of being and it lives happily not disturbing anything or anyone. to farm this animal for meat would be a crime against society. you should come to terms with what u are suggesting, its as wrong! Mara  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 July 23, 2007 6:48 PM

The California supreme court has just ruled in favour of the current laws, which were also being challenged in court.  [ send green star]
 
 June 02, 2007 9:36 PM

The bill has passed in the Senate

http://ozpolitic.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1179303108/2#2

 [ send green star]
 
 May 31, 2007 11:36 PM

Petition to remove California's ban on kangaroo meat:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/510307417

More info on the pending legislation:
 
http://ozpolitic.com/sustainability-party/kangaroo-law.html

The Sustainability Party of Australia supports this petition:

http://www.ozpolitic.com/articles/sustainability-party.html

More information, discussion:

http://ozpolitic.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1179303108

The Kangaroo and the Usurper:

http://www.ozpolitic.com/funny/kangaroo-usurper.html

 [ send green star]
 
 May 16, 2007 1:15 AM

Woohoo! this is great news. Hope the bill passes. Kangaroos are in no danger of extinction and it's time the drugged up hippies in California informed themselves of the facts. There is a bill before the CA senate to rescind the law.

http://ozpolitic.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1168478179/0

http://www.ozpolitic.com/articles/sustainability-party.html

http://www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?gpp=90&pst=535594

 [ send green star]
 
Is Roo Meat still illegal in Califorina? March 29, 2007 4:15 AM


Can you please advise whether the petition "To Allow Roo Meat into California" is still current and signatures needed (ie. they still haven't changed laws as of March 07)?


If so, I know hundreds (which may lead to thousands) of people here in Australia who will sign, as their livelihoods depend on the roo industry.

As a city girl, I grew up thinking the same as many others - that kanagroos are just cute animals to look at and could never cause harm. However, have since discovered that:
* they can, in parts, be in plague proportions,
* that the farmers depend on kangaroo shooters to be able to sustain their farms (so city dwellers can have their milk, bread, cerals, lamb chops and all the other things many think come from cartons or packets!) and
* that the roo industry is heavily regulated by the Australian government.

Did you know that there are specific quotas of where and what type of kangaroos they can cull and this is strickly enforced?

Did you know that roo shooters must hold a licence and are trained in how to cull humanely?

Did you know that Australia is in the midst of one of the worst droughts in it's history and if we don't cull kangaroos then there won't be enough food for any of them to survive? I know if I were a kanagroo I would prefer to killed with one single shot (before I knew what even hit me), rather than dying a slow and painful death by starvation. I have seen this first hand and it is very sad.

What I have also seen first hand is disturbing cattle feedlots, where cows around the world are kept shoulder to shoulder on concrete for their entire lives to provide steaks for us all. Now doesn't the thought of
"free-range" kanagroo meat, from animals that hop and skip and live a happy life until they are culled sound much more humane, and tastier - because they, and the therefore the meat, isn't "stressed"?

And besides, I strongly believe that we should nurture mother nature and rejoice in the circle of life to keep the planet going. Kanagroo is native to Australia, and thus is a natural, healthy re-newable resouce that should be embraced.
 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Vegan meat, cheese, dairy February 13, 2007 9:03 AM

As a vegan for 13 years, I can tell you there is nothing like it!  Try it, you'll like it!

For those who are in the habit of eating meat and dairy, there are vegan substitutes for these, such as imitation soy meats of all types, nut, bean and coconut "milks", vegan imitation margarine and vegan imitation cheeses of various types.  I no longer make anything to eat that resembles meat.  One can make pies, cakes anything with vegan susbstitute ingredients for dairy and eggs, plus using splenda in place of sugar, making these desserts truly wholesome foodstuffs and sugarless.

http://www.peta.org/

http://www.vegsource.com

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]

 
A Question 4 All U Veges February 12, 2007 10:23 PM

Ok, let's assume that the entire world, every man, woman, child and those in between .... has become a vegetarian. Now, what do we do with all those cattle, sheep, chooks, pigs? ... the list goes on. They will still be reproducing, right? And it would be fair to say that a good 50% of them would be male, right? Don't need them all for breding and "survival of the species", but we don't need services of all these males. So, we castrate them. What do we do with these? Oh dear, we have a problem. So, seriously, wat would we do with them?  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous Good Poingts December 06, 2006 12:39 PM

Freediver makes some good points to support his case. It is unlikely that all human beings will ever become vegetarian or vegan. If some of us are going to eat flesh we should do so in sustainable and ecologically beneficial ways. It is the result of our own farming, herding, clearcutting, and hunting practices over time that has led to imbalances in the natural food chain leading to overpopulations of species like kangaroos. If some of them have to be killed to restore an ecological balance that we have destroyed then I say that they may as well be used for meat and other purposes if it can be done in human and sustainable ways.

I used to be vegetarian/vegan but have since returned to eating fish and poultry. I do not eat red meat both for health reasons and because the raising of these herds or flocks of factory farm animals is disastrous for the environment and they are most often subjected to inhumane practices of being raised and slaughtered.

Thomas M.

 [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
Too many roos June 27, 2006 9:45 PM

From Australian Geographic, Jan-Mar 2004, issue 73, "Too many roos"

Roo numbers are artifically boosted by artificial changes to the landscape, such as:

  • land clearing (logging)*
  • new water sources (dams and tanks for farm animals)
  • reduction in Dingo numbers (as well as wild dogs and foxes) by hunting and fences
  • grazing by sheep of saltbush and other plants not favoured by roos

This results in artifically high numbers of roos, which can harm biodiversity. They graze the grass low, but many bird species require long grass for nesting. The short grass and fewer birds will have impacts up and down the food chain. It also increases the boom/bust cycles meaning more roos starve every drought.

Other reasons for roo hunting include:

  • Creates rural employment
  • Provides export income for Australia
  • Eating Kangaroos is good for us: the meat is very low fat while high in iron and free from antibiotics
  • As a commercial species, kangaroos are much easier on the country than cattle or sheep - they eat less, they do not require specialised pastures that are a factor in salinity and soil acidification, are drought tolerant and cause far less damage to the surrounding ecosystems
  • If kangaroos are regarded as a valuable resource their future will be assured
  • Government sanctioned quotas are based on scientific evidence
  • If roo numbers are too large, they affect farmers' livelihoods by grazing on pastures meant for revenue-bringing farm animals, while doing damage to fencing
  • Kangaroos do not emit methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Sheep and cattle emit large quantities - more than the entire contribution to the greenhouse effect from transport in Australia*

*these points added by me

 [ send green star]
 
 May 29, 2006 7:06 PM

I made my first ever roast yesterday, using a herb and garlic kangaroo roast from Coles. It turned out really well. I even made gravy.

This is the company that supplies local stores with kangaroo meat - mince, marinated steaks, roasts etc.

http://www.macromeats-gourmetgame.com.au/aboutmacromeat.html

 [ send green star]
 
 February 05, 2006 5:11 PM

Apparently the kid who played Sonny in the hit TV series Skippy was the only one who did not go on to an acting career. Instead he got into the business of exporting roo meat.  [ send green star]
 
New name for kangaroo meat December 19, 2005 8:56 PM

http://finance.news.com.au/story/0,10166,17620642-31037,00.html

AUSTRALIANS could soon be chucking a piece of "australus" on the barbecue if the new name for a slice of kangaroo makes it more appealing to diners sensitive about eating the national symbol.

Among the 2700 rejected entries submitted by people in 41 nations were kangasaurus, kangarly, marsupan, jumpmeat and MOM (Meat of Marsupials).

"There is nothing more comforting than a mother," said Californian Greg Richardson of his MOM entry. "In order to make kangaroo meat sound more comforting to potential consumers, I figured we could associate one with the other: MOM."

Kangaroo meat sales have grown 50-fold in the past decade to create a $200m a year industry, with Europe a major export market for the low-fat red meat and Russians lapping it up in sausages.

The executive officer of the Kangaroo Industry Association of Australia, John Kelly, said that while his organisation had helped sponsor the competition it had "no really serious intention of changing the name" at this stage.

 [ send green star]
 
 November 22, 2005 4:28 PM

PETA is onto this:

http://www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?gpp=96&pst=290326&archival=

 [ send green star]
 
 November 14, 2005 8:37 PM

Scientists who back roo consumption:
http://www.kangaroo-industry.asn.au/media/sci_list.html

The twisted thinking motivating PETA:
http://ff.org/centers/csspp/library/co2weekly/2005-08-11/peta.htm

Competition entry:
http://www.foodcompanion.com/comp/com.php

 [ send green star]
 
Bid under way to rebrand roo meat November 13, 2005 11:35 PM

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200511/s1506116.htm

A competition is under way to rename kangaroo meat to boost sales in restaurants and supermarkets.

Three hundred entries have been received from the food industry in a bid to rebrand roo, to make it more palatable for Australian and overseas consumers.

The kangaroo industry is worth $200 million a year but believes there is great potential to increase the market.

Competition organiser Mel Nathan says she wants entrants to take it seriously and try not to be silly.

"As I tell people, they're not allowed to come up with names like cyril, skippy, yummy or road-kill. I quite like marsu, I like marla, and I quite like wallagang," she said.

"Marsu was an interesting one, which came in from a person who thought that it reminded her of a marsupial, which a kangaroo is and at the same time it sounds a little exotic."

 [ send green star]
 
ive got a problem with kangaroos November 05, 2005 3:03 PM

yes alexi it is polite to tolerate opinions , but i have a suspicion that connie is another of those hit and run posters like the 13 yr old -- all mouth and no back up bar emotions -- but in case i am incorrect in my assumptions, i will ask connie to solve a huge environmental problem for me -- as i mentioned above , [some months ago] i was off to lightning ridge area -- i was on a research trip to find specimens and locate populations of a new species of terrestrial orchid to assess the species taxonomic rank and spread of population of the species.

it turns out that the plant is a previously unknown species, with a population range [habitat wise] of about 1 square kilometer.

there were 3 colonies located, with a total number of plants less than 60.

during the investigation, one new colony was discovered.

the location was noted on gps, and as it looked like flowering was going to occur the following day, i planned another trip to the site to take photos of flowers.

at 10 am the flowers were still in shade so i decided to return later in the day -- only to find the complete colony had been dug up and the tubers eaten by kangaroos.

tracks, scratches and scat indivcated the culprits to be eastern grey kangaroo.

the other two remaining colonies were not found by the roos this season, and applications are underway for the species to be added to the threatened species list --

the question, connie, is what to do about the kangaroos?

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Don't judge, everyone has a right to an opinion November 05, 2005 12:23 PM

Wouldn't it be lovely, Connie, if the whole world could be vegetarians?  Think about it:  for some people, meat is all the food they have to eat.  That aside, there will always be those that eat plants (herbivores such as rabbits, cows and roos), those that eat meat (yes, strict carnivores such as cats), and the rest who eat lots of different things (omnivores such as bears, pigs and dogs).  There are even plants that eat animals believe it or not!!

just the same, you are entitled to your opinion.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 November 04, 2005 9:10 PM

You don't think that eating roo meat is better for the environment than eating beef?  [ send green star]
 
anonymous R U PPLS CRAZY!! November 04, 2005 9:06 PM

I AGREE W/ THE THIRTEEN YR OLD!! SHE HAS MORE SENSE THAN U PPL DO. I CANT BLEIVE THAT A VEGE WOULD EVEN CONSIDER EATING A KANGAROO!!! U PPLS R SICK. IF U REALLY WANT TO DO SOMETHING FOR THE ENVIROMENT GO VEGAN. SWITCHING TO KANGAROOS WOULDNT SOLVE THE PROB. YOU PPLS MAKE IT SOUND LYK NO BIG DEAL... UGH. IM NOT EVEN GONNA WASTE MY TIME ON U PPLS. HOPE I AT LEAST GOT SOME SENSE IN U. HAHA. THAT WOULD B IMPOSSIBLE!  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous R U PPLS CRAZY!! November 04, 2005 9:06 PM

I AGREE W/ THE THIRTEEN YR OLD!! SHE HAS MORE SENSE THAN U PPL DO. I CANT BLEIVE THAT A VEGE WOULD EVEN CONSIDER EATING A KANGAROO!!! U PPLS R SICK. IF U REALLY WANT TO DO SOMETHING FOR THE ENVIROMENT GO VEGAN. SWITCHING TO KANGAROOS WOULDNT SOLVE THE PROB. YOU PPLS MAKE IT SOUND LYK NO BIG DEAL... UGH. IM NOT EVEN GONNA WASTE MY TIME ON U PPLS. HOPE I AT LEAST GOT SOME SENSE IN U. HAHA. THAT WOULD B IMPOSSIBLE!  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
 October 24, 2005 3:04 PM

Is it expensive?  [ send green star]
 
 October 24, 2005 5:23 AM

Freediver, i have approached several Emu farms here in the district, none of them are selling their meat for some reason. the local supermarkets don't stock it either ( as there are only 2 within 200km we are pretty much dependent on them : i LOVE emu meat and would prefer it any day over other meat! Roxie  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 October 23, 2005 3:01 PM

Farming Emus looked like it was going to take off, then it got a bit overinvested and collapsed. It is now viewed sceptically like one of those dodgy investment schemes. But there are a lot of Emu farms around the place. I'm not sure how viable they are - they require intensive management for a small number of animals.

Roo hunting is beyond the macho thing. It's like like professional fishing - it's a job. At the moment they are harvesting them at well below the sustainable limit. The quotas the government allots are not even filled. This is because the demand is still so low. I hope that as the demand increases, the farmers will eventually switch to farming them, especially in the outback.

 [ send green star]
 
count my vote October 23, 2005 6:55 AM

Ok, you've got my vote.  Though in favor of saving animals, I'm not opposed to eating them.  It's just the method of killing an animal I've got qualms about.  You get ego involved and set macho hunters on the loose out to prove a point (to themselves), you get overharvesting...that goes for anything.  What about farming ostrich?

When I worked at Western Plains Zoo, NSW...they harvest their roos for the carnivores...brilliant.

Cheers, Alexi

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]

 
 October 23, 2005 3:48 AM

Please vote here in favour of roo hunting:

http://smh.com.au/polls/national/form.html

 [ send green star]
 
 August 19, 2005 9:36 PM

The local coles has just started stocking roo mince and it is cheaper than the other mince. Funny how the lean 'heart smart' mince is more expensive, but the really lean stuff is cheapest.  [ send green star]
 
 August 02, 2005 1:32 AM

http://finance.news.com.au/story/0,10166,16128308-31037,00.html

KANGAROOS are a big hit in Russia, so long as they are made into sausages.

Russia is the biggest overseas market for the meat, accounting for almost one-third of kangaroo meat exports, and almost half of Australia's total exports to Russia, Austrade said.

Tonnes of kangaroo meat are exported to far east Russia each month, where it is turned into sausages and snapped up by hungry consumers.

"Australia can't produce enough kangaroo meat," importer Igor Dorokhov said.

"We need 100 containers per month, Australia can only produce 25.

"It's good meat; cheap and good."

Mr Dorokhov, who runs I D Game Meats, said kangaroo was becoming very popular among the eight million residents of far eastern Russia.

His thoughts were echoed by Austrade's Senior Trade Commissioner in Moscow, Gregory Klumov, who hoped the Russian market would expand to include restaurants.

"Russians recognise it is the leanest of all the red meats," Mr Klumov said.

"It's reasonably priced.

"Unfortunately not all of the kangaroo meat goes to restaurants – we would have liked that. It would have been better for Australia because it would have brought awareness to those products."

Mr Klumov believes culture and difficult climate of eastern Russia explain the craving for kangaroo.

"They have grown up in a very difficult environment with difficult weather conditions," he said.

"It's meat, so certainly a lot of them are used to a lot of canned meats, whale meats, seal meats, traditionally.

"Of course, in the far east, as well as in northern Russia ... the sources of protein are scarce.

"You hunt for the animals you can get.

"For them, kangaroo is certainly unique on one hand but on the other it's a good product.

"Their threshold for 'Oh I'm not going to eat kangaroo, they're such fluffy and nice animals', I guess, is much lower because there is not much choice, (and) they are used to exotic things."

 [ send green star]
 
 July 28, 2005 9:24 PM

http://www.uq.edu.au/~zlggrigg/kangaroos.html

Sheep replacement therapy for rangelands.
Grigg has been active, since the mid 1980s, in promoting the idea that better marketing should be undertaken to promote the use of kangaroo meat for human consumption for the international, specialty game meat market. The meat is low in fat, is recommended by cardiac specialists for people with heart disease, and free from insecticides and growth hormones. About three million kangaroos are shot in Australia each year, as pests, under a quota system based on the results of aerial surveys. Their skins makes a very strong, supple and fine leather, which is the basis of an extensive industry. While much of the meat is used, for both pet food and for human consumption (increasingly), most of it is still left to rot where the animals falls.

Grigg argues that kangaroo meat is a product whose potential value is so far unrecognised and unrealised. At higher prices, kangaroos would be redefined, from pest to resource. He asserts that landholders in the sheep rangelands, where kangaroo numbers are highest, could make enough money from a harvest of free-range kangaroos to enable them to have lower stocking rates with sheep, thus lowering grazing pressure on these highly degraded landscapes and, perhaps, facilitating some rehabilitation.

Papers relating to these ideas can be found in Grigg's publication list.

(Also some info on arial kangaroo population surveys)

http://www.uq.edu.au/news/index.phtml?article=7608

Harvesting boosts native mammal value

Professor Grigg making friends with a guanaco (left) and the capybaras on campus at The University of Sao Paulo. Photos: courtesy of Professor Grigg.

Three of the largest native mammals in Australia and South America should be marketed better and harvested instead of being considered pests, according to a Brisbane zoologist.

The University of Queensland’s School of Integrative Biology Professor Gordon Grigg said such an approach was important for the long term conservation of these species.

Professor Grigg said there was still much economic potential in Australia’s kangaroos and also in South
America’s capybara, a giant wetland ‘guinea-pig’ and the Patagonian guanaco, a small camel related to alpacas.

He said the animals should be harvested for their meat, wool and leather which would provide money to conserve the species in native habitats.

As a longtime supporter of kangaroo harvesting, Professor Grigg has teamed up with South American biologists and ecologists who want to expand commercial use of native species.

“Like kangaroos, capybaras and guanacos are creatures that haven’t yet reached their economic potential,” Professor Grigg said.

“Commercial use of the animals, done properly, can lead to their conservation and sustainable use instead of the animals continually being seen as a pest and something that’s unwanted.

“If the animals are not valued commercially, they will remain second class citizens in their own lands.”

He said all three animals were in healthy numbers and used commercially at different levels now, but there had been no great push to further commercialise them.

Their meat held the biggest potential but guanacos also had fine wool rated at 14 microns compared to superfine merino fleece at 17-18 microns.

During a three-week study tour of Brazil and Argentina, Professor Grigg spoke with Brazilian and Patagonian biologists comparing the opportunities and constraints of the different animals.

While in Sao Paulo, Brazil’s biggest city with more than 20 million people, Professor Grigg observed ecologists count capybaras in the city’s waterways using a helicopter.

Unlike his own aerial surveys in Australia, his pilot had to dodge powerlines, bridges and weave through canyons of high-rise apartments.

Professor Grigg has personally expanded UQ’s link with Brazil over the last decade by hosting and supervising exchange students and shared research.

Next year he will work with behavioural ecologist Professor Luciano Verdade, visting from the University of Sao Paulo, on the behaviour and mating systems of red kangaroos in South Australia and Queensland.

Media: Professor Grigg (+61 07 3365 2470, g.grigg@uq.edu.au) or Miguel Holland at UQ Communications (07 3365 2619)

 [ send green star]
 
 May 22, 2005 6:51 PM

Some fun clips highlighting the problems with intensive agriculture:

http://www.themeatrix.com

http://www.storewars.org/flash/index.html

 [ send green star]
 
roo research May 19, 2005 2:33 AM

in a few weeks, i will be travelling by road to the lightning ridge area, and will have the opportunity to report on the numbers, conditions, and damage to the environment they are doing at the moment in mid to north central nsw.

if anyone has some specific things for me to look for, please message me.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 May 17, 2005 1:19 AM

more discussion:

http://www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?gpp=156&pst=71327

 [ send green star]
 
 May 17, 2005 1:17 AM

Please sign the roo meat petition:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/510307417

 [ send green star]
 
 March 16, 2005 6:53 PM

be gentle, she's only 13  [ send green star]
 
 March 16, 2005 6:52 PM

>>> HOW WOULD YOU FEEL IF YOU WERE BORN ON A FARM, LIVED FOR ONE YEAR, THEN SKINNED, CHOPPED UP AND EATEN.<<< Ellie, how does that differ from any other farm animal? sorry sweetie, but such is life  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Ellie, is it really? March 16, 2005 6:50 PM

well lets face it... in China they eat Dogs and Cats ( and they get killed in very inhumane ways), Guinea Pigs in South America, Monkey Brains in Malaysia... the list goes on. if that post is the meanest, most disturbing thing you have ever heard you must have lived a very sheltered life so far,welcome to the real world  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 March 16, 2005 6:47 PM

What's a wallaroo?  [ send green star]
 
 March 16, 2005 6:36 PM

THAT IS THE MEANEST, CRUELEST, MOST DISTURBING THING I HAVE EVER HEARD!!!!!! I LOVE WALLAROO'S WALLABIES AND KANGAROOS!!!!!!! HOW WOULD YOU FEEL IF YOU WERE BORN ON A FARM, LIVED FOR ONE YEAR, THEN SKINNED, CHOPPED UP AND EATEN. HOW COULD YOU EVER THINK OF EATING A POOR LITTLE ANIMAL LIKE THIS?!?!?!??!?!  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
ice March 05, 2005 9:04 PM

I've found that they sell kangaroo meat in the Coles where I live, so maybe other supermarkets are doing the same.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Supermarkets March 02, 2005 4:21 PM

Apparently the problem started when animal liberation groups protested outside supermarkets when they first introduced roo meat. Now they aren't game to stock it. We just need a little gentle pressure to get them to change back. We also need to stop people protesting, though I'm not sure whether that would still happen.  [ send green star]
 
 March 02, 2005 4:19 PM

Some small butchers carry it for human consumption.  [ send green star]
 
agreed March 02, 2005 3:55 PM

wholeheartedly, traditons will be heart to break and it is going to be a slow process. we could start making demands at supermarkets to carry roo meat for human consumption and educate the public with advertising campeigns. if they can sell it as pet meat, why not for humans as well. and it tastes good too  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 March 02, 2005 3:54 AM

Thanks Gari for the comment about my cat Junior.

He is gorgeous.

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 16, 2005 6:21 PM

http://www.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,4057,11959186%255E13762,00.html Kangaroo fur tuxedo hops in By Natasha Bita in Florence January 17, 2005 FOXES and minks face serious competition this week on the catwalks of Florence, where kangaroo fur has become the must-have pelt. Salvatore Ferragamo, the luxury leathergoods house, showed a slim tuxedo jacket made of kangaroo fur, lustrous as black velvet, in its 2005/06 autumn/winter menswear collection in the Italian fashion city yesterday. "We used kangaroo pelt to make the dinner jacket, but we shaved it right back with a razor to give it gloss," designer Massimiliano Giornetti said. Ferragamo used a menagerie of exotic hides, showing an extravagant cloak of Argentinean fox fur, coats of cropped mink, and python-leather jackets coloured orange by hand. Ermenegildo Zegna, the Italian label famed for its no-nonsense business suits, designed a velvety black roo-hide blazer for its youth line, Z-Zegna. "Do you eat kangaroo?" asked top designer Alessandro Sartori. "What does it taste like?" And roos are not the only Australian wildlife straying on to the international catwalks. The world's priciest crocodile skin is being fashioned into luxurious belts, bags, boots and coats. New Zealand, which considers the introduced brush-tail possum a pest, has built an industry selling fluffy possum pelts to eco-friendly designers for fur coats and jackets. Indonesia is a key supplier of snakeskin, feeding the fashion for exotic python leather. Even humble Australian cowhide is winning popularity in Europe. Blundstone, the Australian working-class boot, is selling 15,000 pairs in the world footwear capital of Italy each year, costing about E100 ($170) per pair. "It's original, it's versatile and it's very resistant," Andrea Cane, the company's Italian distributor, said at the Pitti Uomo menswear trade show in Florence. "Even though for you Australians it's a work boot, for us it is a long-wearing classic." Cane said it was crucial that Blundstone boots continued to be made in Australia, as it gave them a marketing edge in Europe. Cult surf label Mambo was the only other Australian company among more than 600 designers exhibiting at Pitti Uomo, Europe's biggest luxury menswear trade fair. For the first time, Mambo recruited three freelance designers from London to help craft its latest collection, which features cream duffle coats and lacy cardigans. The Australian  [ send green star]
 
 January 04, 2005 4:49 PM

Oh yes, thats a whole other can of worms.  [ send green star]
 
To roo or not to roo January 04, 2005 6:37 AM

G'day I'd get your lovely cat under cover Melanie These guys appear set to eat everything! Gari  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Sorry December 28, 2004 10:00 PM

roo = Kangaroo, an Australian native like the one in the group picture it won't make any difference to the dairy industry  [ send green star]
 
 December 28, 2004 9:55 PM

Ok, Freediver said that cows compact the soil and stir up dirt and rip the roots and all out of the ground as opposed to roos nibbling to the ground, how different will the milking cows and the cows that we currently eat be regarding to the soil and roots problem. Cows are cows are they not, correct me if Im wrong but by eliminating one breed does this really solve the problem.  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 December 08, 2004 2:50 AM

[quote]I really don't think that solves anything but nice idea.[/quote] Why doesn't this solve anything? Just out of curiosity...  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 December 05, 2004 8:03 PM

I'm not sure what the problem is. Farming roos is better for our environment than farming cows, and if consumers apply enough pressure (ie they start buying roo meat) the farmers will eventually stock roos instead of cows. Are you still worried about what will happen to all the cows?  [ send green star]
 
 December 05, 2004 7:45 PM

I really don't think that solves anything but nice idea.  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 December 03, 2004 9:35 AM

Easy...the cows that are used for milk are a different breed to the cows that are used for meat. So theoretically, if people stopped eating beef the number of beef cows would drop, leading to fewer cows in total leading to less environmental damage.  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 December 02, 2004 10:57 PM

The cattle won't still be there. We will eat them. The switch will happen slowly. As the consumption of roo meat goes up, the price of beef will drop. The farmers on the more marginal (arid) soil will go broke or switch to roo farming and sell their cattle. There will be less need for people to breed cattle if there is a temporary glut on the market. But this glut will most likely be unnoticable. There is a huge number of cattle bred each year to keep up with demand. The cattle a managed very intensively and each year the farmers decide which cattle to send off to slaughter and which to keep for breeders. There are also some people who only breed cattle and some farmers who buy calves to fatten up for the market.  [ send green star]
 
Roo meat vs Cow meat December 02, 2004 10:35 PM

Sorry to sound ignorant but this is a good argument. If we all switch to roo meat, what is supposed to happen to the cows. They are still going to be there and they are still going to be doing the same damage. please explain just how switching to roo meat is going to help the environment.  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 September 12, 2004 5:57 AM

I'm a vegetarian, but if I were to eat meat, I would probably eat kangaroo, it has the lowest fat count of any meat, it is virtually cholesterol free, and as a farmed species it would do less damage than introduced species.  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
roo meat August 12, 2004 11:06 PM

If you regularly eat steak please consider switching to roo meat. It is now available in many butchers. Cows do a lot of damage to our land that roos don't. Cows have hard hooves which compact the soil and stir up dust. Cows rip grass out roots and all, while kangaroos nibble it down to ground level, leaving the roots for faster regrowth and soil stability. If there is a big enough market, farmers will farm kangaroos instead of cattle.  [ send green star]
 
  New Topic              Back To Topics Read Code of Conduct

 

This group:
Australia
242 Members

View All Topics
New Topic

Track Topic
Mail Preferences