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two more!!
7 years ago

Here are the last two for a while when I can get on here I will post what was out while I was gone. 

Newer drugs extending survival for breast cancer

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2196&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Avastin given thumbs up in Europe for lung cancer

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2197&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Intensive fruit, vegetable diet no better than '5-a-day'
7 years ago

Here is one saying "Intensive fruit, vegetable diet no better than '5-a-day' "

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2195&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

7 years ago

Here is 2 more articles.

National Lung Cancer Partnership debuts new patient tools

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2191&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Tumor painting may improve cancer surgery

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2192&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Surgeons call for more "keyhole" lung surgery
7 years ago

Here is one named "Surgeons call for more "keyhole" lung surgery"

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2190&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Hormone blocking drug shows promise
7 years ago

Here is a article saying that a "Hormone blocking drug shows promise".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2189&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Rash from newer drugs linked to longer survival
7 years ago

Here is one title "Rash from newer drugs linked to longer survival".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2188&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

MRI plus mammography doubles breast cancer detection
7 years ago

Here is one says that "MRI plus mammography doubles breast cancer detection".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2187&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Blood type and lung cancer risk
7 years ago

Here is one that talks about the "Blood type and lung cancer risk".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2186&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Morning sickness has a bright side
7 years ago

Here is one that says that "Morning sickness has a bright side".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2185&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Prostate protection from tomatoes questioned
7 years ago

Here is a article saying that "Prostate protection from tomatoes questioned".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2184&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Simple steps can boost exercise, quality of life
7 years ago

Here is one that was posted yesterday saying that some "Simple steps can boost exercise, quality of life".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2183&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4 

News from 6/9/07-6/18/07
7 years ago

Here are all the articles that was posted while I was gone. 

Estrogen may play a role in lung cancer survival: http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2181&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Early exposure linked to specific skin cancer: http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2178&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Cisplatin slightly better than carboplatin: http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2179&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

FDA grants priority review of anti-cancer pill: http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2180&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Heat added to chemo boosts cancer-free survival
7 years ago

The new article says that "Heat added to chemo boosts cancer-free survival".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2177&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

New treatment options for advanced colorectal cancers
7 years ago

There was a new article put out saying that there is "New treatment options for advanced colorectal cancers".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2176&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Longer survival with arsenic trioxide
7 years ago

Here is a article saying that you have a "Longer survival with arsenic trioxide"

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2175&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

New drug approved for kidney cancer extends survival
7 years ago

Here is one that was put out on May 31 saying that a New drug approved for kidney cancer extends survival.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2174&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Vitamin D and calcium may lower breast cancer risk
7 years ago

Here is one that was put out on May 28 saying that Vitamin D and calcium may lower breast cancer risk.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2173&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Combination chemo halts cancer longer
7 years ago

Here is one that says "Combination chemo halts cancer longer".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2172&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Early tumor response shown by imaging technique
8 years ago

Here is one saying that "Early tumor response shown by imaging technique".

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2171&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4
Oral sex increases risk of throat cancer
8 years ago

Here is a article saying that Oral sex increases risk of throat cancer I can kinda see how that could be true.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2170&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Chemotherapy more effective before breast cancer surgery
8 years ago

Here is a new one that was put out on May 10.  It is title Chemotherapy more effective before breast cancer surgery.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2169&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Pap Test for breast cancer featured at gynecologists meeting
8 years ago

Here we have a article about Pap Test for breast cancer featured at gynecologists meeting. 

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2168&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

'Wrapping' Gleevec fights drug-resistant cancer
8 years ago

Here is some news on 'Wrapping' Gleevec fights drug-resistant cancer

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2167&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Update!!
8 years ago

Sorry was a way for a while.  Was having problems with care2, but now am up and working.  Here are all the sites to the articles that has came up that I couldn't post.

Gleevec reduces recurrence in colon cancer http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2157&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

 Second vaccine shows 100 percent protection against viruse http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2161&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Combination boosts progression free survival http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2162&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Virtual colonoscopy most cost-effective screening test http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2163&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Protein could boost prostate cancer screening accuracy http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2164&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Targeted drug extends life in pancreatic cancer patients http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2165&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Finding may overcome drug resistance in lung cancer http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2166&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Breast cancer patients say caregiver's job not 'highly-affected'
8 years ago

Here is one on Breast cancer patients say caregiver's job not 'highly-affected'!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2155&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Smoking down since California's tobacco control program
8 years ago

Here is one on Smoking down since California's tobacco control program!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2154&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Center recruiting for new lung cancer prevention trial
8 years ago

Here is some news on Center recruiting for new lung cancer prevention trial!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2153&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Prostate cancer vaccine given nod by FDA panel
8 years ago

Here is one on Prostate cancer vaccine given nod by FDA panel!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2151&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

MRI detects most missed tumors in opposite breast
8 years ago

Here is one on MRI detects most missed tumors in opposite breast!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2150&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Rice bran could reduce risk of colon cancer
8 years ago

Here  is on on Rice bran could reduce risk of colon cancer!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2148&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

New procedure reduces swelling after surgery
8 years ago

Here is one on New procedure reduces swelling after surgery!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2147&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Mouse study shows blood pressure drug could treat NSCLC
8 years ago

Here is one on Mouse study shows blood pressure drug could treat NSCLC

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2146&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Soy study opens more questions than answers
8 years ago

Here is one on Soy study opens more questions than answers

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2145&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

FDA approves Tykerb for advanced breast cancer patients
8 years ago

Here is one on FDA approves Tykerb for advanced breast cancer patients

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2143&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Lung motion model may lead to better radiation treatment
8 years ago

Here is one on Lung motion model may lead to better radiation treatment

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2142&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Anti-inflammatory drugs do not prevent colorectal cancer
8 years ago

Here is one on Anti-inflammatory drugs do not prevent colorectal cancer!

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2141&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

CT scans up diagnoses, but may not cut lung cancer deaths
8 years ago

Here is one called CT scans up diagnoses, but may not cut lung cancer deaths.

Cindy S.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2139&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Green tea and arthritis drug slow prostate cancer
8 years ago

Here is one on Green tea and arthritis drug slow prostate cancer.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2140&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

HPV infection common among U.S. females
8 years ago

Here is one on HPV infection common among U.S. females.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2138&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Cindy S.

NSCL cancer vaccine study begins in 30 countries
8 years ago

Here is one on NSCL cancer vaccine study begins in 30 countries.
http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2137&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Company influence growing with research funding.
8 years ago

Here is  one on Company influence growing with researdh funding.

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2135&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Tamoxifen cuts long-term breast cancer risk.
8 years ago

For now on instead of me posting each article i will put the site on here when new things come in.

Cindy S.

Here is one on Tamoxifen cuts long-term breast cancer risk. 

http://www.cancerfacts.com/Home_News.asp?NewsId=2136&CB=14&CancerTypeId=4

Genetic markers for Herceptin Resistance ID'd
8 years ago

Genetic markers for Herceptin resistance ID'd
Source: (cancerfacts.com)
Tuesday, February 20, 2007


PHILADELPHIA – Feb. 20, 2007 – Researchers have found genetic markers that identify breast cancer subtypes resistant to Herceptin®. They say this advance could help further refine therapy for the 25 to 30 percent of breast cancer patients with this type of tumor.

In the Feb. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, the researchers co-led by Dr. Lyndsay Harris, associate professor and director of the Breast Cancer Disease Unit at Yale University Medical Center, found that HER2-positive tumors that did not respond to Herceptin produced a certain pattern of proteins. One of these, insulin-growth factor receptor 1(IGF-1R), was linked to a Herceptin response rate that was half that of tumors that did not produce the protein.

"Herceptin has revolutionized the care of HER2-positive breast cancer for many patients, but unfortunately, not for some," Harris said in a prepared statement. "This work demonstrates that digging deeper into the molecular subtypes of these tumors helps us understand why some tumors are resistant and may point to ways to remedy that."

The researchers also discovered that resistant tumors continue to over produce the HER2 growth factor protein, which is an important finding given that many scientists had thought that loss of HER2 was likely responsible for resistance to Herceptin.

If additional studies confirm these findings, it may be possible to select those HER2-positive patients that will become resistant to Herceptin and treat them with additional drugs to restore Herceptin sensitivity. "Our goal is to see what the tumor tells us before any treatment starts and tailor therapy accordingly," Harris said.

To determine Herceptin sensitivity, investigators took a small tumor biopsy from 48 patients with newly diagnosed and operable stage II/III breast cancer. They examined the biopsy tissue using both single and multi-gene microarrays, looking for RNA that has been activated to produce proteins. Microarrays, sometimes referred to as biochips, were developed as part of the technology used to decipher the human genome (all the genes that make a human). The technology allows researchers to analyze thousands of gene simultaneously.

They then treated the women with a combination of Herceptin and the chemotherapy drug Navelbine® weekly for 12 weeks. Although this is not the first study to test Herceptin use before surgery, it is the first to examine the use of Navelbine, a drug approved for lung cancer treatment, in combination with Herceptin to treat HER2-positive tumors.

"We were motivated to use Navelbine because we found it has few side effects when used to treat metastatic breast cancer," said Harris, who conducted much of the research study at Harvard before moving to Yale.

After treatment, the tumors were surgically removed and gene chips were again used to look at the activated genes in the tumor tissue. The researchers then divided tumors into groups depending on how well they responded to therapy, and examined the differences in which genes were activated before and after therapy to find patterns of genes that were more commonly activated in Herceptin sensitive and Herceptin resistant tumors.

They first found that some single gene markers, such as HER2 and ER (estrogen receptor), did not change in the majority of tumors.

"That tells us that the cancer cells are still creating HER2 surface proteins even as Herceptin is being used, and that means HER2 loss does not appear to be a mechanism of resistance in early stage breast cancer," Harris said.

Then, using multigene microarrays, the researchers derived a panel of transcribed genes that appeared likely to play a role in Herceptin resistance. Some, such as IGF-1R, were suspected, because this protein is frequently over-expressed in breast tumors, Harris says, but others were not. For example, non-responding tumors were more likely to express genes associated with basal-like breast cancer, which the researchers found to be surprising. "Most basal-like tumors are HER2-negative," Harris said.

Herceptin resistant tumors were also more likely to produce a variety of growth factors, suggesting that "activation of parallel pathways may release tumors from dependence on HER2 proliferation and survival," she said.

Although the study was not designed to look at outcome, the researchers determined that 42 of 48 patients had a complete or partial clinical response (meaning all signs of tumor disappeared or shrank to 50 percent or less for more than four weeks) among those treated with the Herceptin and Navelbine treatment before surgery, and five patients experienced heart-related side effects. After a median 2.6-year-follow-up, three of 48 patients relapsed and one died of her disease.

The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute's SPORE grant to the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the Department of Defense Clinical Translational Research Award granted to Dr. Harris in 2003.

Copyright © 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 NexCura, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution

Genetic markers for Herceptin resistance ID'd
8 years ago

Genetic markers for Herceptin resistance ID'd
Source: (cancerfacts.com)
Tuesday, February 20, 2007


PHILADELPHIA – Feb. 20, 2007 – Researchers have found genetic markers that identify breast cancer subtypes resistant to Herceptin®. They say this advance could help further refine therapy for the 25 to 30 percent of breast cancer patients with this type of tumor.

In the Feb. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, the researchers co-led by Dr. Lyndsay Harris, associate professor and director of the Breast Cancer Disease Unit at Yale University Medical Center, found that HER2-positive tumors that did not respond to Herceptin produced a certain pattern of proteins. One of these, insulin-growth factor receptor 1(IGF-1R), was linked to a Herceptin response rate that was half that of tumors that did not produce the protein.

"Herceptin has revolutionized the care of HER2-positive breast cancer for many patients, but unfortunately, not for some," Harris said in a prepared statement. "This work demonstrates that digging deeper into the molecular subtypes of these tumors helps us understand why some tumors are resistant and may point to ways to remedy that."

The researchers also discovered that resistant tumors continue to over produce the HER2 growth factor protein, which is an important finding given that many scientists had thought that loss of HER2 was likely responsible for resistance to Herceptin.

If additional studies confirm these findings, it may be possible to select those HER2-positive patients that will become resistant to Herceptin and treat them with additional drugs to restore Herceptin sensitivity. "Our goal is to see what the tumor tells us before any treatment starts and tailor therapy accordingly," Harris said.

To determine Herceptin sensitivity, investigators took a small tumor biopsy from 48 patients with newly diagnosed and operable stage II/III breast cancer. They examined the biopsy tissue using both single and multi-gene microarrays, looking for RNA that has been activated to produce proteins. Microarrays, sometimes referred to as biochips, were developed as part of the technology used to decipher the human genome (all the genes that make a human). The technology allows researchers to analyze thousands of gene simultaneously.

They then treated the women with a combination of Herceptin and the chemotherapy drug Navelbine® weekly for 12 weeks. Although this is not the first study to test Herceptin use before surgery, it is the first to examine the use of Navelbine, a drug approved for lung cancer treatment, in combination with Herceptin to treat HER2-positive tumors.

"We were motivated to use Navelbine because we found it has few side effects when used to treat metastatic breast cancer," said Harris, who conducted much of the research study at Harvard before moving to Yale.

After treatment, the tumors were surgically removed and gene chips were again used to look at the activated genes in the tumor tissue. The researchers then divided tumors into groups depending on how well they responded to therapy, and examined the differences in which genes were activated before and after therapy to find patterns of genes that were more commonly activated in Herceptin sensitive and Herceptin resistant tumors.

They first found that some single gene markers, such as HER2 and ER (estrogen receptor), did not change in the majority of tumors.

"That tells us that the cancer cells are still creating HER2 surface proteins even as Herceptin is being used, and that means HER2 loss does not appear to be a mechanism of resistance in early stage breast cancer," Harris said.

Then, using multigene microarrays, the researchers derived a panel of transcribed genes that appeared likely to play a role in Herceptin resistance. Some, such as IGF-1R, were suspected, because this protein is frequently over-expressed in breast tumors, Harris says, but others were not. For example, non-responding tumors were more likely to express genes associated with basal-like breast cancer, which the researchers found to be surprising. "Most basal-like tumors are HER2-negative," Harris said.

Herceptin resistant tumors were also more likely to produce a variety of growth factors, suggesting that "activation of parallel pathways may release tumors from dependence on HER2 proliferation and survival," she said.

Although the study was not designed to look at outcome, the researchers determined that 42 of 48 patients had a complete or partial clinical response (meaning all signs of tumor disappeared or shrank to 50 percent or less for more than four weeks) among those treated with the Herceptin and Navelbine treatment before surgery, and five patients experienced heart-related side effects. After a median 2.6-year-follow-up, three of 48 patients relapsed and one died of her disease.

The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute's SPORE grant to the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the Department of Defense Clinical Translational Research Award granted to Dr. Harris in 2003.

Copyright © 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 NexCura, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of cancerfacts.com content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of NexCu

Breath test detects lung cancer in early stages
8 years ago

Breath test detects lung cancer in early stages
Source: (Press Releases)
Friday, February 16, 2007


FORT LEE, N.J. – Feb. 16, 2007 (PRNewswire) – A new breath test has been reported to detect lung cancer in its early stage. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and doctors believe that early detection could offer sufferers their best chance for survival.

Dr. Michael Phillips, CEO of Menssana Research, the company that developed the breath test, said, "We developed a breathalyzer that is one billion times more sensitive than those the police use to measure alcohol in the breath. It detects around 200 different chemicals in a person's breath, and some of these chemicals are markers of cancer. A breath test has great advantages over most other medical tests - it is completely safe, painless and non-invasive. All you have to do is breathe gently into a tube for two minutes. There are no potentially dangerous x-rays to worry about, and it will certainly be a lot less expensive than chest imaging."

In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health that will be published in Cancer Biomarkers, researchers studied 404 smokers and ex-smokers aged over 60. The breath test predicted lung cancer with almost the same accuracy as computerized tomography, or chest CT, the best screening test for lung cancer currently available.

Early detection is essential to save lives. Lung cancer affects over 170,000 Americans annually and more than 95% of them are dead within 5 years if the tumor has metastasized to other organs, versus only 20% if the tumor is found while it is still confined to the lung.

The breath test will not be available in the USA until approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but may be available sooner in the European Union.

Menssana Research is currently developing breath tests to detect several other diseases in their early stages, including pulmonary tuberculosis, breast cancer, and ischemic heart disease.

The FDA has already approved the Heartsbreath test for heart transplant rejection. Dr. Phillips said he hopes that physicians and patients will eventually consider a breath test the way we think of a chest x-ray or blood test: as an inexpensive and convenient screening test which can detect several diseases in their earliest and most treatable stages.

SOURCE: Press release from Menssana Research, Inc.

Lung cancer much higher among women non-smokers
8 years ago
Lung cancer much higher among women non-smokers Source: (cancerfacts.com) Wednesday, February 14, 2007 STANFORD, Calif. – Feb. 14, 2007 – Close to 20 percent of cases of lung cancer in women and around 8 percent in men occur among never-smokers, a new study shows. Among women that rate is surprisingly higher than experts had previously thought. While it has long been estimated that about 10 percent of lung cancers occurred among non-smokers, there haven't really been any studies to directly analyze the rate says Dr. Heather Wakelee, assistant professor of medicine at Stanford, who led the study appearing in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. "People tend to banter about this number of 10 to 15 percent of lung cancer cases being in people who have never smoked," Wakelee said in a prepared statement. ""But when you actually try to find the hard data to show that, it's very limited. We can actually put numbers on it now. Before this, we could only estimate based on our own census." The researchers used multiple databases from both the United States and Sweden to track the incidence of lung cancer in more than 1 million people from the ages of 40 to 79. They calculated the lung cancer incidence rates in terms of new cases per person-year, representing every year that someone was included in the study. They found that for women, the lung cancer incidence rate in never-smokers ranged from 14.4 to 20.8 cases per 100,000 person-years. In men, it ranged from 4.8 to 13.7 incidents. For current smokers, the rates were about 10 to 30 times higher. Putting these numbers in perspective, Wakelee points out that the lung cancer rate among non-smoking women are comparable to cervical cancer with 15.4 cases per 100,000 women and thyroid cancer with 17.3 cases per 100,000 people. The study was not designed to answer why the rate is so much higher among women than men, but the suggestion of secondhand smoke comes to mind since more men than women smoke. Wakelee added, however, that a number of environment pollutants and occupational exposures, including asbestos, chromium, arsenic and radon, are thought to cause lung cancer in never-smokers, but these links have not been unquestionably proven and more study is needed to establish those links and answer these and other questions regarding lung cancer among non-smokers. Eventually showing which factors increase the chances of never-smokers developing lung cancer will allow doctors to understand, at a molecular level, how the cancer works. And this, Wakelee hopes, will lead to new treatment options. Already, scientists know that some therapies work better in lung cancer patients who never smoked because the histology of their tumors is different. Clinical observations have suggested an upward trend in non-smoking-associated lung cancer rates, and the Stanford researchers hope their data can eventually be used to test this. They see their current work as a baseline, and want future studies of the same type to allow them to extrapolate a trend. The team also hopes that by studying lung cancer in never-smokers, they can alleviate some of the stereotypes associated with the disease. "I have a lot of patients who have never smoked," said Wakelee. "And because of the stigma, people are embarrassed to speak out about their disease. They feel like as soon as they say they have lung cancer, everyone judges them." She added that the stigma affects not only patients' lives, but funding and support for researchers. Copyright © 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 NexCura, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of cancerfacts.com content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of NexCura. NexCura® is a registered trademark and cancerfacts.com™ is a trademark of NexCura, Inc. or its affiliates. Copyright © 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 2006, 2007. All rights reserved. This information is for educational purposes only.
Cancer News 1
8 years ago
| Need to Read
Here I will be posting all cancer news. To new research, medicines and so on. Read as you would like. Cindy S.