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anonymous Polar Bears July 17, 2007 2:17 PM

Polar bears roam the Arctic ice sheets and swim in that region's coastal waters. They are very strong swimmers, and their large front paws, which they use to paddle, are slightly webbed. Some polar bears have been seen swimming hundreds of miles from land—though they probably cover most of that distance by floating on sheets of ice.

Polar bears live in one of the planet's coldest environments and depend on a thick coat of insulated fur, which covers a warming layer of fat. Fur even grows on the bottom of their paws, which protects against cold surfaces and provides a good grip on ice. The bear's stark white coat provides camouflage in surrounding snow and ice. But under their fur, polar bears have black skin—the better to soak in the sun's warming rays.

These powerful predators typically prey on seals. In search of this quarry they frequent areas of shifting, cracking ice where seals may surface to breath air. They also stalk ice edges and breathing holes. If the opportunity presents itself, polar bears will also consume carcasses, such as those of dead whales. These Arctic giants are the masters of their environment and have no natural enemies.

Females den by digging into deep snow drifts, which provide protection and insulation from the Arctic elements. They give birth in winter, usually to twins. Young cubs live with their mothers for some 28 months to learn the survival skills of the far north. Females aggressively protect their young, but receive no help from their solitary male mates. In fact, male polar bears may even kill young of their species.

Polar bears are attractive and appealing, but they are powerful predators that do not typically fear humans, which can make them dangerous. Near human settlements, they often acquire a taste for garbage, bringing bears and humans into perilous proximity.
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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:17 PM

Photo: Mother polar bear coaxes her cub up a snow bank  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:18 PM

Type: Mammal
Diet: Carnivore
Average lifespan in the wild: 25 to 30 years
Size: Head and body, 7.25 to 8 ft (2.2 to 2.5 m); Tail, 3 to 5 in (7.5 to 12.5 cm)
Weight: 900 to 1,600 lbs (410 to 720 kg)
Size relative to a 6-ft (2-m) man:
Illustration of the animal's relative size
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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:19 PM

Photo: A polar bear sleeps soundly
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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:20 PM

Photo: Close-up of polar bear paws
Polar bear paws have thick fur and sharp claws. The fur gives them better traction on ice, while the claws are excellent weapons for hunting.
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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:20 PM

Photo: A wet polar bear sticks his head up above the ice
Morning!!!  
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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:21 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:22 PM

Global Warming in the Arctic has caused the slow demise of the Polar bear species. The melting ice hascaused many problems for the polar bears. One reason that this is effecting the Polar bears is because this is where a lot of Polar bears live and now they have no home. This is the first time that Polar bears have found dead from drowning because their homes are melting away. Some Polar bears were noted swimming 60 miles without find another home.

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:23 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:24 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:24 PM

Goals of the Sea World Education Department

Based on a long-term commitment to education, Sea World strives to provide an enthusiastic, imaginative, and intellectually stimulating atmosphere to help students and guests develop a lifelong appreciation, understanding, and stewardship for our environment.  Specifically, our goals are...

  • To instill in students and guests of all ages an appreciation for science and a respect for all living creatures and habitats.
  • To conserve our valuable natural resources by increasing awareness of the interrelationships of humans and the environment.
  • To increase students' and guests' basic competencies in science, math, and other disciplines.
  • To be an educational resource to the world.

"For in the end we will conserve only what we love. We will love only what we understand. We will understand only what we are taught." -B. Dioum

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:25 PM

I. Scientific Classification.

A. Order - Carnivora.
The scientific order Carnivora includes bears, dogs, cats, raccoons, otters, weasels, and their relatives. All typical carnivores have well developed claws and a pair of specialized cheek teeth for cutting hard foods.

B. Family - Ursidae.
All bears belong to this family. The family is divided into three subfamilies, Ursinae (black bears, brown bears, polar bears, sloth bears, and sun bears), Tremarctinae (spectacled bears), and Ailuropodinae (giant pandas).

C. Genus, species - Ursus maritimus.

1. There are five other species in the genus Ursus: brown bears, American black bears, Asiatic black bears, sun bears, and sloth bears. Species can be distinguished by size, build, coloration, and habitat.

2. Ursus maritimus is Latin for "sea bear".

D. Fossil record.
The oldest known polar bear fossil is less than 100,000 years old. Polar bears probably developed during the Pleistocene era from an ancestral brown bear. Polar bears and brown bears are still closely related; when cross-bred, they produce fertile offspring.

Habitat and Distribution



Polar Bear Index

 


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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:25 PM

II. Habitat and Distribution.

A. Distribution.

1. Polar bears are found throughout the circumpolar Arctic.



normal range normal range occasional range over pack occasional range over pack occasional range over permanent ice occasional range over permanent ice

2. Polar bears, or their tracks, have been reported almost as far north as the pole; however, scientists believe few bears frequent areas north of 82 north latitude. The northern Arctic Ocean has little food for them.

3. The polar bears' southern range is limited by the amount of sea ice that forms in the winter. Polar bears prefer to travel on sea ice.

    a. In the south, polar bears are annual visitors to St. Lawrence Island, southern Labrador, and Svalbard.

    b. In heavy ice years, polar bears have traveled as far south as the Pribilof Islands,Kamchatka, Newfoundland, and Iceland.

    c. The most southerly dwelling polar bears live year-round in James Bay, Canada.


4. The majority of polar bears are found near land masses around the edge of the polar basin.

5. Scientists believe there are 15 relatively discrete polar bear subpopulations (Wiig, 1993-94). A subpopulation is a group of polar bears with a home range independent of but overlapping that of other polar bears. For example, two subpopulations live in the James/Hudson Bay area, one in western Hudson Bay and the other in northwestern Ontario and James Bay (Stirling, 1988).

B. Habitat.

1. Polar bears inhabit Arctic sea ice, water, islands, and continental coastlines.

2. Polar bears prefer sea ice habitat with leads, next to continental coastlines or islands(Stirling, 1993).

    a. Leads are water channels or cracks through ice which may remain open (ice free) for only a few minutes to several months, depending upon weather conditions and water currents.

    b Polar bears hunt seals in the leads, using sea ice as a platform.

    c. The "Arctic ring of life" is a biologically rich system of leads and
    polynyas. It runs parallel to the polar basin coastline.

    (1)Polynyas are areas of water, surrounded by ice, that remain open throughout the year due to winds, upwellings, and tidal currents.

    (2)Polynyas are important breathing and feeding areas for wintering or migrating marine mammals and birds.

3. Some polar bears spend part of the year on land.

    a. Polar bears in warmer climates may become stranded on land. In summer, sea ice melts along the coastlines, and pack ice (floating sea ice, or floes, not connected to land) moves north.

    b. Most pregnant females spend the autumn and winter on land in maternity dens.


4. Air temperatures in the Arctic average -34C (-29F) in winter and 0C (32F) in summer. The coldest area in winter is northeastern Siberia, where the temperature has been recorded as low as -69C (-92F). The warmest areas in summer are inland regions of Siberia, Alaska, and Canada where temperatures can reach as high as 32C (90F).

5. The ocean temperatures in the Arctic are about -1.5C (29F) in summer. In winter the ocean temperatures can drop to -2C (28F), at which point seawater freezes.

Arctic ring of life
The "Arctic ring of life" is a biologically rich system of leads and polynyas. It runs parallel to the polar basin coastline.

C. Migration.

1. Polar bears travel throughout the year within individual home ranges.

    a. Home range size varies among individuals depending upon access to food, mates, and dens (Stirling, 1988).

    b. Home ranges tend to be larger than for other mammal species because sea ice habitat changes from season to season and year to year.

      (1) A small home range may be 50,000 to 60,000 square km (19,305/23,166 square mi.). Small home ranges can be found near Canadian Arctic islands.

      (2)A large home range may be in excess of 350,000 square km (135,135 square mi.). Large home ranges can be found in the Bering or Chukchi Seas.

    c. Polar bears don't mark or defend their home ranges.

2. Polar bears show "seasonal fidelity": they remain in the same area during the same season (Stirling, 1988).

3. Polar bears are capable of traveling 30 km (19 mi.) or more per day for several days (Stirling, 1988). One polar bear was tracked traveling 80 km (50 mi.) in 24 hours (Sage, 1986). Another polar bear traveled 1,119 km (695 mi.) in one year (Macdonald, 1987).

D. Population.

1. The world polar bear population is estimated to be between 21,000 and 28,000 individuals (Wiig, 1993/94).

2. Due to governmental regulations on hunting, the population has increased from an estimated 10,000 polar bears in 1968 (Stirling, 1988).

3. The ratio of males to females is approximately one to one.

Polar Bear Physical Characteristics

 

Polar Bear Index
Polar Bear Index


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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:26 PM

III. Physical Characteristics.

A. Size.

1. Polar bears are the largest land carnivore.

2. Male polar bears (boars) grow two to three times the size of female polar bears (sows). Boars weigh about 350 to more than 650 kg (772-1,433 lb.) and are about 2.5 to 3 m (8.2-9.8 ft.) long (Stirling, 1988).

3. Sows weigh about 150 to 250 kg (331-551 lb.) and are about 2 to 2.5 m (6.6-8.2 ft.) long. Pregnant females can weigh as much as 500 kg (1,102 lb.) (Stirling, 1988).

4. The largest polar bear ever recorded was a male weighing 1,002 kg (2,209 lb.) and measuring 3.7 m (12 ft.) long (Domico, 1988).

B. Body shape.

Compared to other bears, polar bears have elongated bodies and long slender necks.

C. Coloration. paws

The coat can vary from pure white to creamy yellow to light brown depending upon season and angle of light.

D. Limbs.

1. The hind limbs are longer than the forelimbs. This makes the large, muscular hind end stand higher than the shoulders.

2.Polar bear legs are large and stocky.

3.Feet are five-toed paws.

    a. Polar bears have large paws compared to body size, reaching 30 cm (12 in.) in diameter. The large paws of a polar bear act like snowshoes, spreading out the bear's weight as it moves over ice and snow.

    b. The forepaws are round, and the hind paws are elongated.

    c. Each toe has a thick, curved, nonretractable claw. The claws are used for grasping prey and for traction when running or climbing on ice.

    d. The sole of a polar bear's foot has thick, black pads covered with small, soft papillae (dermal bumps). The papillae create friction between the foot and ice to prevent slippage. Long hairs growing between pads and toes also help prevent slippage.

E. Head.

1. A polar bear's head is oblong and relatively small compared to body size. The muzzle is elongated with a "Roman-nosed" (slightly arched) snout.

2. The nose is broad and black.

3. Teeth.

    a. Polar bears have 42 teeth, which they use for catching food and for aggressive behavior.

    b. Polar bears use their incisors to shear off pieces of blubber and flesh.

    c. Canine teeth grasp prey and tear tough hides.

    d. Jagged premolars and molars tear and chew.

    e. Polar bears swallow most food in large chunks rather than chewing.


4. A polar bear's eyes are dark brown, set relatively close together, and look forward.

5. The ears are small and rounded, and lay flat when under water.

F.Tail.

The tail is small, about 7 to 12 cm (2.8-4.7 in.) long.

G.Hair.

1.Polar bears are completely furred except for the nose and footpads, which are black.

2.A polar bear's coat is about 2.5 to 5 cm (1.2 in.) thick. A dense, woolly, insulating layer of underhair is covered by a relatively thin layer of stiff, shiny, clear guard hairs.

3.Polar bear fur is oily and water repellent. The hairs don't mat when wet, allowing the polar bears to easily shake free of water and any ice that may form after swimming. Ice forms when the wet fur is exposed to air temperatures at or below freezing.

4.The hairs reflect light, giving a polar bear its white coloration. Oxidation from the sun, or staining, can make the hairs look yellow or brown.

5.Polar bears completely molt (shed and replace their fur) annually, in May or June. The molt can last several weeks.

H.Skin.

A polar bear's skin is black.

hair
A polar bear's coat is about 2.5 to 5 cm (1-2 in.) thick. A dense, wooly, insulating layer of underhair is covered by a relatively thin layer of stiff, shiny, clear guard hairs.


Polar Bear Senses

 

Index
Polar Bear Index

 


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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:27 PM

IV.Senses.

A. Hearing.

A polar bear's hearing is probably as sensitive as human hearing. Humans can hear sounds with frequencies as low as 0.02 kHz and as high as 20 kHz.

B. Eyesight.

The eyesight of polar bears appears to be similar to human's. Polar bears have a protective membrane over their eyes, that may help shield the eyes from ultraviolet light.

C. Tactile.

Little is known about a polar bear's sense of touch; however, polar bears have been observed delicately moving or touching objects with the nose, tongue, and claws.

D. Taste.

Polar bears prefer certain foods, but researchers don't know how acute the sense of taste is or how important it is in food preference.

E. Smell.

A polar bear's sense of smell is acute, and it is the most important sense for detecting prey on land. A polar bear can smell a seal more than 32 km (20 mi.) away (Domico, 1988).

Polar Bear Adaptations

 

Polar Bear Index
Polar Bear Index


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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:28 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:29 PM


Ursus Maritimus

Polar bears live year round near arctic waters hunting seal and other animals, rarely coming on land except on islands and rocky points.  In winter they hunt along the Arctic shelfs looking for tasty seals, fish, and even humans!  Their white coats provide camouflage in the ice and snow which make them almost invisible as they stalk their prey. 

In winter, when they are far from land they search for breathing holes made by seals.  When the seal comes up for air, the polar bear will kill it and flip it out of the water with a single blow of its great clawed paw! Polar bears are very dangerous, and grow to a huge size and weigh as much as small automobile (1000 pounds). They have longer legs than other bears and large furry feet. These big feet help to distribute their weight as they walk on thin ice in the arctic waters. Polar bears are strong swimmers and can stay submerged for two minutes at a time. Their fur is made of hollow hairs which trap air and help to insulate them in the frigid waters. 

In November polar bears retire to dens dug out of the snow or permafrost. The females remain until the spring when they emerge with one or two cubs who stay with them for the next year and a half. The males spend a shorter time in the dens and may be seen out and about at any time of the year. 

POLAR BEAR

Polar Bear
Photo © William Fitzhugh

Picture  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:30 PM


Edward Nelson Recounts:

"The Eskimo of Saint Lawrence Island and the American coast are well supplied with firearms which they use when bear-hunting.  In winter, north of the straits, the bears often become thin and very savage from lack of food.

A number of Eskimo on the Alaskan coast show frightful scars obtained in contests with them in winter.  One man, who came on board the Corwin, had the entire skin and flesh torn from one side of his head and face including the eye and ear, yet had escaped and recovered. One incident was related to me which occurred near Point Hope during the winter of 1880-'81. Men went out from Point Hope during one of the long winter nights to attend to their seal nets, which were set through holes in the ice.  While at work near each other, one of the men heard a bear approaching over the frosty snow, and having no weapon but a small knife, and the bear being between him and the shore, he threw himself upon his back on the ice and waited.  The bear came up and for a few moments smelled about the man from head to foot, and finally pressed his cold nose against the man's lips and nose and sniffed several times; each time the terrified Eskimo held his breath until, as he afterwards said, his lungs nearly burst. The bear suddenly heard the other man at work, and listening for a moment he started towards him at a gallop, while the man he left sprang to his feet and ran for his life for the village and reached it safely.  At midday, when the sun had risen a little above the horizon, a large party went out to the spot and found the bear finishing his feast upon the other hunter and soon dispatched him.  Cases similar to this occur occasionally al1 along the coast where the bear is found in winter."

Picture

Polar bear with face
bloodied by seal
Photo © Stephen Loring

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:32 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:33 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:33 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:34 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:34 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:35 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:35 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:36 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:37 PM

polar bear with cub  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:38 PM

polar bear walking in snow

two polar bear in landscape

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:39 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:41 PM

polar bear photo Search Alaskaphotogrpahics for more polar bear picturesPolar bears  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:41 PM

polar bear photo Polar bear, Ursus maritimus  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:42 PM

Polar bear mother and cubs polar bear photo  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:42 PM

polar bear photo  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:43 PM

polar bear photo  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:46 PM

Of all mammals, the Polar bear captures the imagination as the great lord of the Northern Hemisphere. It's solitary existence in remote and severe locations provoke mystery and intrigue. As the top trophic level carnivore in the remote arctic, they have uniquely adapted to this harsh and unforgiving environment.

General description

Polar bears and brown bears evolved from a common ancestor and are still closely related, as demonstrated by matings and production of fertile offspring in zoos. Polar bears are similar in size to large brown bears.

Adaptations by the polar bear to life on sea ice include:

  • a white coat with water repellent guard hairs and dense under fur,
  • short furred snout,
  • short ears,
  • teeth specialized for a carnivorous rather than an omnivorous diet,
  • and hair nearly completely covering the bottom of the feet.

Cubs weigh between 1 and 2 pounds (0.5-0.9 kg) at birth. An extremely large adult male may weigh 1,500 pounds (680 kg). Most mature males weigh between 600 and 1,200 pounds (273-545 kg), and are between 8 and 10 feet (2.4-3.0 m) in length. Mature females weigh 400 to 700 pounds (182-318 kg).

Life history

Polar bears, other than family groups of females and young, are solitary most of the year. During the breeding season in late March, April and May, males actively seek out females by following their tracks on the sea ice.

  • Bears are polygamous, and the male remains with a receptive female a relatively short time and then seeks another female.
  • Pregnant females seek out denning areas in late October and November. Denning occurs on land and on sea ice.
  • A denning female excavates a depression in the snow under a bank, on a slope, or near rough ice. She enlarges the denning chamber as drifting snow accumulates in depth.
  • Young are born in the den in December.
  • A litter of two is the most common.
  • The female cubs emerge from the den in late March or early April when cubs weigh about 15 pounds (6.8 kg).
  • They make short trips to and from the open den for several days as the cubs become acclimated to outside temperatures. They then start traveling on the drifting sea ice.
  • Young most commonly remain with the mother until they are about 28 months old.
  • Females can breed again at about the same time they separate from their young, so normally they can produce litters every third year.
  • Bears in the wild have been recorded as old as 32 years but most probably do not live beyond 25 years.
Distribution and migration  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:47 PM

Polar bears are most abundant near coastlines and the southern edge of the ice, but they can occur throughout the polar basin. They make extensive movements related to the seasonal position of the ice edge.

  • In winter, bears off Alaska commonly occur as far south as St. Lawrence Island and may even reach St. Matthew Island and the Kuskokwim Delta.
  • During the summer, bears occur near the edge of the pack ice in the Chukchi Sea and Arctic Ocean, mostly between 70° and 72° north latitude.
  • Pregnant females concentrate for winter denning on Wrangel Island and other Russian islands, islands in the Canadian arctic, Greenland, and Spitsbergen.
  • Some denning occurs along the north Alaska coast, especially within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and on the adjacent sea ice.
  • Mark and recapture studies indicate that there are several populations of polar bears in the polar basin that have relatively little interchange with one another. Off Alaska there are two populations.
  • The Beaufort Sea population occurs along the North Slope of Alaska and ranges into western Canada.
  • The Chukchi population occurs off western Alaska with its range extending to Wrangel Island and eastern Siberia.
Foods

polar bear photo
Polar bears play in Churchill, Manitoba, CANADA © Patrick J. Endres
The main food of polar bears adjacent to Alaska is the ice-inhabiting ringed seal. Bears capture seals by waiting for them at breathing holes and at the edge of leads or cracks in the ice. They also stalk seals resting on top of the ice and catch young seals by breaking into pupping chambers in snow on top of the ice in the spring.

Bears prey to a lesser extent on:

  • bearded seals,
  • walruses, and beluga whales.
  • They also feed on carrion, including whale, walrus, and seal carcasses they find along the coast.
  • They occasionally eat small mammals, bird eggs, and vegetation when other food is not available.
  • A keen sense of smell, extremely sharp claws, patience, strength, speed, and the camouflaging white coat aid in procuring food.
Human uses
polar bear photo
Polar bear coexist with Alaska native villages. © Patrick J. Endres

Polar bears occur in areas under the jurisdiction of five nations--Russia, Norway, Denmark, Canada, and the United States--and also on the high seas where jurisdiction is not clearly defined. In Alaska prior to the late 1940s, nearly all polar bear hunting was by Eskimos with dog teams. Sport hunting, sometimes with the use of aircraft, started in the late 1940s and continued through 1972. In 1972 the state of Alaska prohibited the use of aircraft in polar bear hunting. With the passage of the Statehood Act, Alaska began a polar bear management program. State regulations required sealing of skins, provided a preference for subsistence hunters, and protected cubs and females with cubs.

The federal Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA)

polar bear photo
Degradation to polar bear habitat is currently of more concern than effects of hunting on populations. Human activities, especially those associated with oil and gas exploration and extraction, pose the greatest immediate threat. © Patrick J. Endres
of 1972 transferred management authority from the state to the federal government and placed a moratorium on hunting of marine mammals by people other than Alaska Natives. This resulted in a reduced total harvest, but an increase in the proportion of female bears and cubs. The MMPA includes provisions that allow for waiver of the moratorium or transfer of management authority back to states. At intervals since 1972, the state of Alaska has made efforts at regaining polar bear management. State management could allow a resumption of sport hunting and produce increased economic opportunities in coastal rural communities. For a variety of reasons, efforts to regain state management have been discontinued. Polar bear meat, other than that of males in the rut, is quite palatable when boiled. It is a favored subsistence food in some areas. Meat should be cooked thoroughly before eating as polar bears have a high incidence of trichinosis, the round worm which occurs in pork and in other bear species.

Representatives of the five polar bear nations prepared an international agreement on conservation of polar bears in November 1973. The pact was ratified in 1976. It allows bears to be taken only in areas where they have been taken by traditional means in the past and prohibits the use of aircraft and large motorized vessels as an aid to taking. The agreement has created a high seas polar bear sanctuary but does not prohibit recreational hunting from the ground using traditional methods. In Canada, recreational hunting of polar bears currently provides significant economic benefits to Native people.

The stocks of polar bears in Alaska are shared with other nations and national management programs should be coordinated. In 1988, the North Slope Borough Department o  [report anonymous abuse]

 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:49 PM

Representatives of the five polar bear nations prepared an international agreement on conservation of polar bears in November 1973. The pact was ratified in 1976. It allows bears to be taken only in areas where they have been taken by traditional means in the past and prohibits the use of aircraft and large motorized vessels as an aid to taking. The agreement has created a high seas polar bear sanctuary but does not prohibit recreational hunting from the ground using traditional methods. In Canada, recreational hunting of polar bears currently provides significant economic benefits to Native people.

The stocks of polar bears in Alaska are shared with other nations and national management programs should be coordinated. In 1988, the North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management (representing Alaska Natives) and the Inuvialuit Game Council (representing Canadians) signed an agreement to provide for coordinated management of the Beaufort Sea polar bear stock. Negotiations are currently underway between the U.S. and Russia for an agreement on management for the Chukchi stock.

Degradation to polar bear habitat is currently of more concern than effects of hunting on populations. Human activities, especially those associated with oil and gas exploration and extraction, pose the greatest immediate threat. Oil exploration and drilling activities in denning areas could cause bears to den in less suitable areas. Oil spills from offshore drilling and transportation of oil through ice covered waters could contaminate bears and reduce the insulating value of their fur, or adversely affect animals in the food chain below them. Severe environmental conditions would hinder or prevent containment of a spill, and currents and ice movement could distribute oil over large areas

Text by Jack Lentfer
Revised by Lloyd Lowry and reprinted 1994

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:50 PM

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A typical scene from the Tundra Lodge


Polar Bear Photo Tour

Photographers have flocked to Churchill for many years, taking advantage of the wonderful nature encounters this remarkable region has to offer. This photography expedition is designed to provide the very best polar bear photography available. From the newly constructed Great White Bear Tundra Lodge, situated outside of Churchill on the tundra itself, you can photograph bears as they approach the “hotel.” Since use of this facility is exclusive to these tours, you will have plenty of room for gear and for shooting. There will also be a vehicle on site so you can take daily excursions around the tundra. On this special adventure, join accomplished photography tour leaders, all of whom have extensive experience shooting in Churchill. Your Expedition Leaders may include Colin McNulty and Steven Morello, two of the most established nature photographers in the world!

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:51 PM

Funny Picture of a Polar Bear on Ice  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:53 PM

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anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:59 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 2:59 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 3:00 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 3:00 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 3:01 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 3:01 PM

Original image is larger than shown here. DISPLAY FULL IMAGE.  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 17, 2007 3:02 PM

Display this image ONLY on new window   [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  December 02, 2007 12:34 PM

Polar Polar bear 

Female polar bear with very young cubs

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anonymous  December 03, 2007 8:49 AM

I LOVE POLAR BEARS.  APART FROM GORILLAS I THINK THESE BEAUTIFUL CREATURES ARE IN GRAVE DANGER OF EXTINCTION BECAUSE OF THEM DROWNING DUE TO NO ICE..   [report anonymous abuse]
 
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National Geographics Animal Kingdom
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