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The Dingo July 18, 2007 1:39 PM

Australian DINGO 


DINGO
GENERALThe Dingo is found in Australia (except Tasmania). It is a wild form of the domestic dog, and thus is a mammal. dingoes are not by nature a pack dog, but rather live and hunt alone or in pairs or as a small family group.(though it has been seen that some groups on occasions have "assisted" another group in a hunt) Dingoes appear to have clearly defined home territory, though parts of this territory may be shared with other dingoes Pack of dingoes
HISTORYThe Dingo is not truly native to Australia and there are 2 common theories to its arrival to our shores
-1) dingoes were brought to Australia at least 15,000 years ago by Aboriginal people, (evidence is now suggesting the Aborigine and the Dingo arrived at different times)
-2) The Dingo may have been related to the semi wild dogs found throughout South East Asia, and brought to Australia by sea farers who used them for trade and/or eating.

click for info on pic DESCRIPTIONIts short-haired coat colour wise, ranges from reddish ginger, rust, yellow to browns and (rarely) to black with white points on the feet, snout and the tip of the tail The dingo (the size of a medium dog) has a fairly bushy tail, strong claws a very angular alert looking head with erect ears. This canine does not bark (though it does howl) HABITATThe Dingo can be found in almost any part of the Australian mainland which provides access to drinking water, (as it needs to drink once a day). Because of this need for water the dingo prefers the edge of forests which butt on to grasslands, but are forced inland to more semi-arid areas (mainly by man)

FEEDING & HUNTINGclick on pic for info dingoes are an opportunistic carnivores (meat eating) predator hunting mainly at night. They prefer mammals but this diet can be supplemented by reptiles insects etc. The size of their prey ranges from small rodents, rabbits lizards through to sheep and kangaroos. dingoes usually hunt alone or in pairs but when small game is scarce and larger prey must be tackled, cooperative hunting takes place. BREEDINGThe Dingoes becomes sexually mature at the age of 1 year and they take a lifetime mate. Breeding takes place only once a year, with the bitch giving birth to between one and eight pups, (usually 3 to 4) in Spring Both the male and female Dingo takes part in raising the
pups, which stay with the parents for a period of 12 months up to 3 years. Pups are born blind but with a good covering of fur in a den. After being weened (2 months) the mother regurgitates food for the pups until they are about 4 months old when they are capable of starting to try and hunt for themselves. They are able to eat and hunt small game such as rodents and rabbit
Australia's Wild Dog  [ send green star]
 
 July 18, 2007 1:45 PM

DINGO

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 July 18, 2007 1:47 PM

Descended from the Indian wolf, the ancestors of today's dingo (Canis lupus dingo) were probably brought to Australia by seafaring Indonesians over 4,000 years ago.  They are usually ginger-yellow with white patches on the chest, muzzle and paws.  Other colors exist, and may show interbreeding with domestic dogs.  Dingos form packs when hunting large prey such as kangaroos, but often scavenge alone.  They are opportunistic carnivores, feeding on whatever is available, from insects to large mammals.  They used to be plentiful throughout the continent (but not on Tasmania) but are now not found in the heavily inhabited areas of southeastern and southwestern Australia.  To keep the dogs out of agricultural lands a 9,600 km-long (about 6,000 mile) "dingo fence" was erected several decades ago through New South Wales and Queensland.  The dingo is endangered due to interbreeding with domestic dogs and persecution by farmers.  The dominant pair of the pack breeds once a year and the entire pack helps feed and raise the litter of 1 to 10 pups.  We have seen wild dingos in the Queensland Outback and on Fraser Island.  Animals that have been fed or allowed to scavenge in campgrounds can become aggressive.  When walking on Fraser Island we were advised to carry a large stick (with which to defend ourselves vigorously if attacked) maintain eye contact, keep arms crossed in front, and back slowly away.  Never run or wave your arms.  Dingos howl to communicate with the pack.  They rarely bark.

Dingo

(or Warrigal) Dingo

The origins of the dingo are obscure and there is much controversy. It is not truly native to Australia but is thought to have arrived between 3500 and 4000 years ago. Whatever its origins, the dingo was a highly valued companion to the Aborigines. They were hunting companions, guard dogs, the dingos kept them warm at night.

Some believe they were brought here on rafts or boats by the ancestral aborigines. It has also been suggested that they came with Indonesian or South-East Asian fishermen who visited the northern coast of Australia.

The dingo can be found in all areas of Australia - from harsh deserts to lush rainforests. The highly adaptable dingo is found in every habitat and every state of Australia, except Tasmania. In deserts, access to drinking water determines where the animal can live. Pure-bred Dingo numbers in the wild are declining as man encroaches deeper and deeper into wilderness areas, often accompanied by his domestic dog.

Dingo

The dingo is different from the modern dog in several ways: it yelps and howls, but it does not bark, it has a different gait, and its ears are always erect. Dingos are naturally lean and they are usually cream to reddish-yellow with white points, some are black with tan points. An adult dingo stands more than 60cm high and weighs about 15kg. It is slightly smaller than a German Shepherd.

In its natural state the dingo lives either alone or in a small group unlike many other wild dog species which may form packs. Dingos have a clearly defined territory which they rarely leave and which they protect from other dingos, but which may be shared with other dingos when they form a group to hunt larger prey. The size of the home territory varies according to the food supply. Dingos hunt mainly at night. Groups are controlled by a dominant male. Members of a group maintain contact by marking rocks and trees within their territory, and by howling, particularly in the breeding season.

The dingo's diet consists of native mammals, including kangaroos, although domestic animals and some farm stock are also on the menu. This makes the animal unpopular with farmers. The dingo is thought to have contributed to the mainland extinction of the thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) through increased competition for food.

Dingo

The dingo is an intelligent animal. It is no more dangerous to man than any other feral dog. The natural prey of the dingo is small mammals and ground-dwelling birds, but with the introduction of white settlement, they became such a menace to sheep, calves and poultry that measures had to be taken in an attempt to control them, such as "dog-proof fences".

Dingos start breeding when they reach the age of one or two but only the dominant members within an established group breed. They breed only once a year. Mating usually occurs in autumn/early winter and after a gestation of nine weeks (same as domestic dogs) a litter averaging 4-5 pups is born, which are reared in a hollow log, a rock-shelter, or an old rabbit warren. Both parents take part in raising the pups. The pups are fully grown at seven months of age. A dingo may live for up to ten years.

Wild dingos are wary of humans and do not attack unless provoked. They will approach camps in the bush looking for food or perhaps out of curiosity. Dingos can be kept as pets but should be obtained at a very young age to enable them to bond with humans. Even when raised from pups they never seem to lose their instinct for killing poultry or small animals. Not all states in Australia allow dingos to be kept as pets and a permit is required. The export of dingos is illegal.

 

Dingos and domestic dogs interbreed freely resulting in very few pure-bred dingos in southern or eastern Australia. This threatens the dingo’s ability to survive as a separate species. Public hostility is another threat to the dingo. Because it takes some livestock, the dingo is considered by many to be a pest.

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 July 18, 2007 2:07 PM

Dingo may save Australian wildlife

Photo: Dingo in the desertENLARGEWALLPAPER

Dingo in the desert
Photograph by Jason Edwards
Dingo Profile

The dingo is legendary as Australia's wild dog, though it also occurs in Southeast Asia. The Australian animals may be descendents of Asian dingoes that were introduced to the continent some 3,000 to 4,000 years ago.

These golden or reddish-colored canids may live alone (especially young males) or in packs of up to ten animals. They roam great distances and communicate with wolf-like howls.

Dingo hunting is opportunistic. Animals hunt alone or in cooperative packs. They pursue small game such as rabbits, rodents, birds, and lizards. These dogs will eat fruits and plants as well. They also scavenge from humans, particularly in their Asian range.

Dingoes breed only once a year. Females typically give birth to about five pups, which are not independent until six to eight months of age. In packs, a dominant breeding female will kill the offspring of other females.

Australia is home to so many of these animals that they are generally considered pests. A famous "dingo fence" has been erected to protect grazing lands for the continent's herds of sheep. It is likely that more dingoes live in Australia today than when Europeans first arrived.

Though dingoes are numerous, their pure genetic strain is gradually being compromised. They can and do interbreed with domestic dogs to produce hybrid animals. Studies suggest that more than a third of southeastern Australia's dingoes are hybrids.

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Australian Dingo FactsA wild dingo doesn't carry any excess flesh.

An elegant medium sized dog, the fully grown Australian dingo is up to 60 cm tall and weighs between 13 and 19 kg.

(A pure bred dingo will usually be lean and taught...)

The colour of a dingo reflects its surroundings. Most common is a reddish, golden yellow or sandy coloured coat (desert dingoes).

About 10% of the population show a dark or even black coat with tan markings (in forest habitats), and a very small number, less than 1% can be very light cream, nearly white (alpine dingo).

Dingoes don't bark, they only howl.

The Australian dingo breeds once a year (twice is normal for dogs), usually starting at the age of one or two. The breeding season is from March - June and the average size of a litter is four to five.

Both parents take part in the raising of the pups. The den can be a hollow log, a rock shelter, an old rabbit warren or similar.

Young dingoes will start leaving the den for short periods of time at about 3 weeks of age, they will be fully grown at 7 months.

The normal life span of a dingo is up to 10 years in the wild,  [ send green star]

 
 July 18, 2007 2:11 PM

Return to top

Australian Dingo FactsA wild dingo doesn't carry any excess flesh.

An elegant medium sized dog, the fully grown Australian dingo is up to 60 cm tall and weighs between 13 and 19 kg.

(A pure bred dingo will usually be lean and taught...)

The colour of a dingo reflects its surroundings. Most common is a reddish, golden yellow or sandy coloured coat (desert dingoes).

About 10% of the population show a dark or even black coat with tan markings (in forest habitats), and a very small number, less than 1% can be very light cream, nearly white (alpine dingo).

Dingoes don't bark, they only howl.

The Australian dingo breeds once a year (twice is normal for dogs), usually starting at the age of one or two. The breeding season is from March - June and the average size of a litter is four to five.

Both parents take part in the raising of the pups. The den can be a hollow log, a rock shelter, an old rabbit warren or similar.

Young dingoes will start leaving the den for short periods of time at about 3 weeks of age, they will be fully grown at 7 months.

The normal life span of a dingo is up to 10 years in the wild, but can reach 13 to 18 years in captivity.

Dingoes have a clearly defined territory which they rarely leave. Often they live alone. They also form packs consisting of the parents and their offspring of several years.

Dingoes also hunt for food alone (mainly at night), although they can hunt bigger prey in packs.

The dingo is a carnivore, but like other wild dogs it can live without meat. Actually, like all dogs dingoes should be called omnivores. They can eat meat but don't need to.

                

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anonymous re: July 18, 2007 2:36 PM

do these dogs make good pets if their raised from a puppy>?  [report anonymous abuse]
 
 July 20, 2007 9:30 AM

Yes they do. Haven't you ever seen Steve Irwin with all their dingos? They are sweet animals, just like regular dogs.

Here's a 4-day old dingo pup -

More pups...

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 July 20, 2007 9:08 PM

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