Start A Petition
 
 
TRADITIONAL ROMANIAN MEAL October 21, 2007 5:25 AM

Food & Wine

The main ingredients used by Romanian chefs are meats such as pork, beef and lamb, fish, vegetables, dairy products and fruit. A traditional Romanian meal may include:

Appetizer
All kinds of cheeses, cold cuts and vegetable spreads.

Soup
"Ciorba de perisoare" (meatball soup), "ciorba taraneasca" (vegetable soup, with or without meat), "ciorba de burta" (tripe soup).

Fish
"Saramura" (grilled carp in brine), "nisetru la gratar" (grilled Black Sea sturgeon) or "scrumbie la gratar" (grilled herring).

Entree
"Tocanita" or "tochitura" (meat stew seasoned with onions and/ or spices), "ghiveci" (over 20 vegetables cooked in oil), "sarmale" (pickled cabbage leaves stuffed with a mix of minced meats, rice and spices) and "mititei" (The "Wee Ones" - small skinless grilled sausages) are among the favorites.

Dessert
"Papanasi" (cottage cheese donuts, topped with sour cream and fruit preserve), "clatite cu branza" (crepes filled with cottage cheese, raisins and spices) and "cozonac" (traditional holiday sweet bread filled with walnuts, poppy seeds or cream cheese).

A traditional drink enjoyed with appetizers is "tuica" (a potent plum brandy) which varies in strength, dryness and bouquet according to the production area.

Whether you travel in Romania along the coast of the Black Sea or in the Dorbrudja Plateau near the Danube Delta region or in the Province of Moldova or along valley slopes of the scenic Carpathian Mountains or in Transylvania Province or in Wallachia or in nearly any agricultural area throughout Romania, you’re in wine country.
Romania is one of the world’s top-ranking producers of numerous delicious wines, some of which never leave its borders.

Archeological evidence of country-wide wine production in Romania’s grape-friendly soil and climate dates back to the classical Greek and Roman eras of settlement in Romania. Today, on a list of the world’s “Top 12 Wine Producers,” in which France ranks number one and Italy is listed as number two, Romania ranks tenth (10th) among the world’s top wine producers by volume. (Attribution: U.S. News & World Report, May 20, 2002, page 30, citing source: Wine Institute based on data from Office Internationale de la Vigne et du Vin.)

For the traveler interested in adding viniculture to his or her cultural itinerary, a trip to Romania offers many opportunities to visit wine-producing regions and to discover and sample the many different wines of Romania, from little known local and regional wines to Romania’s great wine labels, such as Murfatlar, Cotnari, Jidvei, Dealu Mare and Odobesti.

Romania’s climate and soil are hospitable to the production of many different types of wines, from dry, sparkling whites to rich, aromatic, purplish reds. And, since traditional Romanian fermentation methods do

 [ send green star]
 
DINER AT THE COUNT'S BY JOYCE DALTON October 21, 2007 5:27 AM

Dinner at the Count's
by Joyce Dalton

Torches burn in front of the early 20th century Bucharest mansion. A black-cloaked doorman reminds guests that they "enter freely" and "of (their) own will." Two words familiar to aficionados of Bram Stoker's classic novel, Dracula, diners enter the Count Dracula Club, a theme restaurant situated, appropriately, in Bucharest — Romania's capital.

The restaurant's three dining salons feature a distinct decor. In the Transylvania room, hand-carved chairs, service plates from the ceramics center of Corund, a ceiling of wooden shingles, and walls adorned with pottery, festival masks and cloth witches remind diners of the Count's home turf.

In the Hunting Salon, the pelts of a wolf, a wild cat, a wild boar and a Carpathian bear cover the walls, along with the antlered head of a stag. All are from the collection of a man who lived and hunted in the area of the Borgo Pass, which the fictional Jonathan Harker crossed on his fateful visit to Dracula's castle. Tables are carved of rough wood and chairs sport black woolen covers.

For an introduction to a major figure in Romanian history, a portrait of Vlad Tepes dominates the Medieval Room. While the prince dealt harshly and often gruesomely with all he perceived as enemies, Tepes is revered by Romanians for his bravery against invading Turks and many resent Stoker's portrayal of their hero as a vampire. Armor and crossed halberds, leased from Bucharest's Military Museum, evoke the Medieval mood, as do engravings of 15th Century battle scenes, an iron chandelier and heavy, silver plated service plates. A ceramic stove, or soba, stands against one wall. Lined with photographs from Dracula films, a narrow staircase leads to a cellar level English pub, reminiscent of the Count's London days, and to a small, book-filled Library. Beyond a secret door (a moveable wine rack), the Chapel houses, in addition to tables and chairs, a box filled with Transylvanian soil. This is Dracula's daytime resting place.

romanian

Night, of course, is a different story. As guests sip such concoctions as Transformation, Elixir Dracula and Transylvania Night, the lights begin to dim and the air seems to chill. If diners move quickly, they might reach the Chapel in time to see the Count pushing back the cobwebs surrounding his coffin to emerge for his nightly prowl. First, though, he wanders through each room, presumably, checking out dinner possibilities.

Since, as Bram Stoker has told us, books are Dracula's friends, he pauses in the Library, but no one occupies its one table that evening. Moving on to the English pub, he recalls pleasant days spent in 19th Century London and smiles at a picture of the boat that brought him to England where he met Mina, his true love.

Happy to leave his solitude and mingle with guests, the Count mounts the narrow staircase as flames from the silver candelabrum in his hand cast flickering shadows on the walls. Reaching the Medieval room, he studies the portrait of his namesake and speaks of Vlad Tepes and the Order of the Dragon, which was awarded to Vlad's father, also known as Vlad Dracul.

romanian

Moving on to the Transylvania room, the Count, spying the masks and other traditional artifacts, reminisces about his native land and his beloved castle high in the Carpathian Mountains' Borgo Pass. "I've dined already," he tells his startled guests, a la Stoker, before moving on to the Hunting Salon.

As he listens to the howling of wolves and stares at the various skins and pelts covering the walls, Dracula recounts tales of hunting parties near his mountain home. "Listen to the children of the night. What music they make!" he exclaims, quoting, as always, his 19th century creator. Noticing that he is not alone, the Count inquires of his guests, "Do you prefer to hunt or be hunted?"

His head swirling with memories, Dracula puts a record on an ancient gramophone. But the sentimental music casts him into despair for it reminds him that Mina soon will marry another. With a swirl of his long black cloak and flowing white scarf, he takes his leave, hoping the dark streets of Bucharest will provide solace for an aching heart.

With their host now absent, diners' thoughts again return to the menu, which is a treat in itself as each item is named and described in Draculean words. Among the dozen or so hot and cold appetizers, diners can choose Professor's Van Helsing's favorite dish or lamb pastrami and polenta. The menu reminds diners that Van Helsing, the Count's most fierce enemy, preferred dried beef with cheese, basil, garlic and olive oil while Vlad Dracula's chef prepared the lamb dish for Mohammed II's messengers, serving it just before their impalement.



Several sour soups are offered. As the menu explains, Transylvanian cuisine uses sour cream, tarragon and eggs in a variety of soups. The egg, it adds, is a symbol of resurrection and in earlier days, an egg was put in a loved one's coffin.

Count Dracula's special entrees include Devil's Chicken in Hot Sauce ("Doubtless, there is something strange or magnetic in the sauce's ingredients which works for life in a peculiar way," according to the menu) and Outlaws' Brochettes (in Jonathan Harker's  [ send green star]
 
 October 21, 2007 5:27 AM

Papanasi ...  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
I ABSOLUTELY AGREE WITH YOU, DEAR ELENA October 21, 2007 5:34 AM

YES, DEAR ELENA, I AGREE........I'D LIKE TO EAT NOW 'PAPANASI' TOO,BUT TO GO AND COOK......LOL......I AM WAITING FOR COUNT DRACULA INVITE ME TO DINERR WITH HIM, LOL, WHAT DO YOU SAY, ARE WE GOING????????  [ send green star]
 
COME AND ENJOY 'COUNT DRACULA RESTAURANT! LET'S GO.... October 21, 2007 5:36 AM

Continental and Romanian offerings also feature several fish and game dishes. Tradition says that on St. George's night, at the stroke of midnight, all the evil in the world has full sway. However, if one stays on a lake's edge and sees a fish, he will be have luck throughout the year.

For dessert, clatite, a crepe filled with chocolate, fruit jam or cheese, shouldn't be missed. While ordinary mortals must settle for a less dramatic entry, an evening at the Count Dracula Club restaurant is certain to add a memorable note to a Romanian trip.

The restaurant is situated on the banks of the Dambovita River, a short taxi ride or reasonable walk from most Bucharest hotels:

Count Dracula Club Restaurant
Splaiul Independentei 8A
Bucharest, Romania
Telephone: 312 13 53
E-mail: office@romantic.ro  [ send green star]
 
TRADITIOANL MEALS October 27, 2007 4:18 PM

[edit] Romania
  • Piftie (pork- and cow-based aspic, with pork meat, vegetables and garlic)
  • Cârnaţi (pork-based saussages)
  • Tobā (various cuttings of pork, liver boiled, diced and "packed" in pork stomach like a salami)
  • Sarmale (rolls of cabbage pickled in brine and filled with meat and rice, see sarma)
  • Cozonac, sort of Romanian equivalent of panettone [
 [ send green star]
 
 October 28, 2007 3:53 PM

Back to the Romanian food, at a crama you'll find great portions of typical Romanian dishes such as cabbage rolls filled with pork.

There's also what Westerners might consider more exotic fare, such as ciorba de burta – tripe soup. This is mild-flavoured and really tasty with sour cream – an essential accompaniment to many Transylvanian soups.

 [ send green star]
 
 October 28, 2007 5:39 PM

Romanian cuisineIt’s true that people usually don’t travel in order to eat, but it’s impossible to ignore the traditional food of the places you visit. Actually, traditional dishes complete the gallery of special memories you bring from a vacation. In Romanian kitchen, the local history and geography are fully reflected. The variety of the relief offers a reach assortment of fruits and vegetables, substantially different from one region to another. The same time, the neighbors and colonists – especially in Transylvania – imprinted a delicious influence on the local cuisine. Romania was given with abundant hills and plains, high mountains and clear lakes, but also with the Black Sea coast and with the extraordinary Danube ...more information

 [ send green star]

 
A GOOD 'CIORBA' November 01, 2007 2:20 PM

 [ send green star]
 
'SARMALE' November 01, 2007 2:21 PM

 [ send green star]
 
AND SOME GOOD WINES November 01, 2007 2:22 PM

 [ send green star]
 
BON APPETIT November 01, 2007 2:24 PM

 [ send green star]
 
THAT'S HOW THE ROMANIAN CHEESE IS MADE November 01, 2007 2:28 PM

 [ send green star]
 
 November 02, 2007 4:46 PM

But don't imagine we eat this goodys all the time, we eat junkfood too! Especialy young generations. I have to admit I do not know how to cook " sarmale" ....but my mother knows  therefore I think I shoul visit her!!

a

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
November 8, 2007 Florida, U.S.A. November 08, 2007 10:51 AM

Hello Veronica and Simona !

Great thread ! But, just don't stop there!

 Could you tell us about your "special meals" for "holidays" and "holy days" ?

Namaste and Best Wishes,

Miriam

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
Cozonac November 08, 2007 7:45 PM

q

This is one of  traditional sweets, it ' made from sweet, nuts  cocoa and Turkish delight.

q

q

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
cozonac before you have baked November 08, 2007 7:48 PM

q  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
and after... November 08, 2007 7:55 PM

q

This is the traditional sweet for all hohydays,but are thew traditional cakes specifically every region or hollyday

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 November 08, 2007 7:58 PM

q

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 November 08, 2007 7:58 PM

q  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 November 08, 2007 7:59 PM

q  [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
FROM ' GO, ROMANIA TOURS' November 26, 2007 3:49 PM

Traditional Cuisine in Romania


Romanian Cuisine

The Local Beverage

A meal in Romania is incomplete without a drink of the local spirit, tuica. A plum brandy usually enjoyed before a meal along with some appetizers. It varies in strength, dryness and smell according to the region. But if you attempt this drink beware it does have a kick to it

The rich and tasty food in Romania is an influence of foreign settlers that have occupied the land in the past. Nations such as Greeks, Hungarians, Germans and Turks. These past influences have allowed Romania to create its is own unique gastronomy. Pork is the favourite main dish among most Romanians but you will also find great beef, lamb and chicken dishes. Savouring fish dishes are typical of the Danube Delta. Most meals are complemented by soup which is a national specialty in Romania. Also a variety of delicious cakes can be found on special events and holidays.

Here are a few of Romania's national dishes not to be missed:

COIRBA - A sour soup made from fermented bran, bacon, potatoes and beef or chicken.

MITITEI (Pronounced Meech) - Minced Meat Rolls with aromatic herbs.

TOCHITURA - A hearty meat stew seasoned with onions and/or spices.

MAMALIGA - Made from corn, a staple food that can be prepared in a variety of ways.

 


 

 [ send green star]
 
 November 27, 2007 12:03 AM

http://www.nexternal.com/vegane/images/LookInPeaceLg.jpg



This post was modified from its original form on 27 Nov, 0:05  [ send green star]  [ accepted]

 
EARTHLINGS - feature length documentary November 27, 2007 12:15 AM

Meat eaters, please watch the videos...

EARTHLINGS
is a feature length documentary about humanity's absolute dependence on animals (for pets, food, clothing, entertainment, and scientific research) but also...

WARNING! GRAPHIC!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhxKnys7Ryw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sRiH_Owq9U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8U9dw-9U4E

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]

 
 November 27, 2007 12:24 AM

Cute video!!!

Piggies are friends not food!

'
 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
WELL SAID, DEAR MONIKA January 19, 2008 6:57 AM

YOU'RE RIGHT......UNTILL HERE PEOPLE WILL UNDERSTAND WHY ARE ANIMALS ON THIS EARTH THEY WILL BELIEVE THEY ARE FOR US... FOR IT THEM.... FOR THEIR FUR....THAT'S HUMAN!!!!!!  [ send green star]
 
SOME TRADITIONAL MEALS........ NO COMMENT January 19, 2008 6:59 AM

DSC01183.jpg picture by veraiconelach
click to add description  [ send green star]
 
CIORBA DE PERISOARE January 19, 2008 8:36 AM

DSC01182.jpg picture by veraiconelach
 [ send green star]
 
 January 27, 2008 10:47 AM

OK, I'll be over for dinner.
What shall I bring?
 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous cozonac January 27, 2008 11:03 AM

someone send me some after baking  pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeee  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
anonymous  January 29, 2008 8:03 AM

now i'm hungry..  [report anonymous abuse]  [ accepted]
 
 January 29, 2008 11:11 AM

For info....

Call to stop suffering of pigs slaughtered in Romania without being stunned

From: Steven Blaakman
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 3:12 PM

Subject: Call to stop suffering of pigs slaughtered in Romania without being
stunned

PRESS INFORMATION


Brussels, 29 January 2007
Call to stop suffering of pigs slaughtered in Romania without being stunned

Two leading animal welfare organisations are calling for an end to the
Romanian practice of slaughtering pigs at home for Christmas without
stunning them first.

An investigation by Eurogroup for Animals and VIER PFOTEN Romania has
uncovered that the cruel practice is still widespread in the country despite
contravening a European Union directive stating animals must be killed
without unnecessary suffering.

The two groups have now written to Markos Kyprianou, Commissioner for Health
at the European Commission, to demand EU action on the backyard slaughter
that affects as many as 1.5 million pigs each year.

Many Romanian families kill one or two pigs in the festive season by
slitting the animals' throats. This contravenes a European directive that
stipulates pigs, sheep and goats should be stunned first if they are being
killed at home for own consumption. Romania is asking an exemption to the
directive on religious grounds.

Eurogroup and VIER PFOTEN want the Commission to take steps to make sure
Romania complies with European animal welfare legislation.

Sonja Van Tichelen, director of Eurogroup for Animals, said: "Although the
celebrations themselves might be tradition in Romania, there is nothing
religious about the way these animals are being killed.
"There is no reason for animals to be suffering so much when it can be
avoided."

Dr Marlene Wartenberg, director of VIER PFOTEN European Policy Office,
added: "It is time for Romania to bring its slaughter practices in line with
European legislation. There is no place for such a medieval practice in a
modern state."

Eurogroup is offering to help Romania adjust to the change by giving advice
and training.

- ENDS -

For more information call Steven Blaakman, senior press officer at
Eurogroup, on 0032 (0)27400823 or email him on
s.blaakman@...

Pictures showing the slaughter of pigs in the Romanian villageof Calugareni
last December are available on request. They should be credited to VIER
PFOTEN / Mihail Vasile

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
FOOD WITHOUT MEAT January 30, 2008 7:32 AM

Q

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
 January 30, 2008 1:20 PM

Thank you dear Simona !!!   It looks delicious!!

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]

 
 November 04, 2008 3:29 PM

Simona I beg you on mny knees have you got the recipie?
It just looks MARVELOUS!!!
I just adore traditional cuisine...what I have read so far sounds FANTASTIC!!!
I am trying to become vegetarian, even though I like meat...for an ethical reason I have gotten rid of most meat in my meals. But CAKES and ANY veggie option is more than welcome
Pretty pretty pleeeeeaseee......can you post some recipies?
I have seen some DELICIOUS goodies and I am just DYING to try them out

What is this beauty you posted above? Is it potatoes? and what is the stuffing?
And the sauce?

 [ send green star]  [ accepted]
 
HI, DEAR ALICE, November 05, 2008 12:47 PM

WENICE TO SEE YOU HERE,INDEED IT LOOKS DELICIOUS.............. HOPE, SIMONA WILL SEE YOUR QUESTION AND WILL REPLY, LET"S WAIT HER, SIMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

 [ send green star]
 
  New Topic              Back To Topics Read Code of Conduct

 

This group:
Romania, the land of Dracula?
288 Members

View All Topics
New Topic

Track Topic
Mail Preferences


New to Care2? Start Here.