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Discuss: Carl Sagan (1934-1996)
Anonymous
7 years ago
Take a look at this Share:

Tribute: Carl Sagan (1934-1996)
(1 comments) — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_SaganThis month marks the tenth anniversary of Carl Sagan's death, and his passing was a profound loss for science, as well for humanity in general. It is impossible to exaggerate the influence Sagan had...  more


CARL AND COSMOS!
7 years ago

I, too, was deeply affected by the "Cosmos" series, and by Carl and his hypnotic, velvet voice. Before that broadcast, I had never had much interest in outer space, but he woke me up to the wonder that is our universe! What a loss!

Dino Almond

Anonymous
7 years ago

It appears not everyone in Care2 respects Carl Sagan.

http://www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?gpp=187&pst=808274

Anonymous
7 years ago
Probably because it has nothing to do with C2 Feedback and Suggestions.  They've been pretty clear there about what constitues on and off topic discussion and not too many people appreciate discussion outside of that.  It has nothing to do with you Dale, I'm sure.
Anonymous
7 years ago

Well, let the Care2 admin decide that! What irks me is that the mysterious flagger strikes me and then does not explain openly why he did it.

Cowardice I have no regard for. Anonymous flagging or voting on flagged posts should not be allowed because it allows for no accountability for either the flaggers or the voters.

Anonymous
7 years ago
They are only doing what Care2 has set before them.  A little Nanny game so those who can't handle reading something that they don't like go for the Care2 baby tools.  Again... a Care2 problem, nothing about you.
7 years ago

Carl Sagan was a tremendous individual, a pioneering spirit in science and in bridging the gap between science and the public. I have read numerous books by his, watched the series, movies, etc. and all of them have that stroke of humanity that makes his work so accessible to all. A lot of times scientists lose themselves in their work, and quite often are unable to relate back to the public, either in terms of their own work or in general social experiences. Carl was different. He was both a great scientist and a great educator. He was able to instill that sense of amazement at the universe, at science, from the tiniest atom to the largest galaxy.  That is sorely lacking from a lot of the scientific teaching community as well, and they would do well to look to him to help positively motivate kids to do research and science for its own sake (i.e. not for monetary or celebrity rewards).  His loss will be sorely missed by all who continue to wonder at the universe at large, but he will always remain in our hearts.


(I could go on and on and on and on, but there's not enough space.)

Thank you dear Dale
7 years ago

Thank you for posting the Tribute in Care2 Feedback & Suggestion, an appropriate place for many admirers of Dr. Carl Sagan.

I remember how (many years back) I would save some money to buy Carl's wonderful Books, the first one was "COSMOS", a hard bound large Book with a very beautiful cover, and I spent many an afternoon reading his book! I also remember waking up early every Sunday morning and free myself from anything other to watch an hour long COSMOS series on Television. I remember his clear and distinct speech begining each of the series being shown. His explanation and appropriate use of words and clarity impressed me greatly! Yes, he is my hero, a source of scientific knowledge. His quest into unbound Space became my quest too!

Anonymous
Carl Sagan's official website
7 years ago

http://www.carlsagan.com/

Carl Sagan had five children including his son Nick, whose voice was immortalized at age six as a greeting on the Voyager Interstellar Record. This is what Nick Sagan had to say about his father recently.

My dad was a scientist and my mom's a writer, so there was definitely influence from both sides of the family. My relationship with my dad started out good and became great. There are so many kids who, when they're growing up, ask their parents questions -- "Why is the sky blue?" -- and get told, "Look it up!" or "Be quiet!" My dad, on the other hand, was the best teacher I could have had. A lot of times we'd be looking up at the stars, and we'd have philosophical discussions about where science and religion intersect, things like that. Of all the genres of fiction, I think science fiction is the one that comes closest to addressing these kinds of big questions.

He was the kind of father who loved to teach you about things he knew, but he also loved to learn. And there were some things we bonded over that had nothing to do with either—basketball, for example. Mainly, I feel incredibly lucky. As one of the leading astronomers of our time, he had an amazing ability to make complicated things understandable, and as a kid you have all these questions about how the universe works. I learned so much from him. On the other hand, there were times when his fame lent my childhood a surreal quality.

My school would show episodes of Cosmos, and so I’d be in science class watching my dad on television. Or we’d go out somewhere together and fans would come over wanting autographs, telling him he’d changed their lives. That would be cool, but it would also cut into our time together. I didn’t live with him growing up, so we tried to make every moment count.

flagged?
7 years ago

I missed that you had been flagged.  I do not understand this.  But based on the discussion here, it was a lowly act to flag without first announcing oneself and making a personal complaint here for discussion and understanding.

I will always honor Carl Sagan's enthusiasm and his teachings.  He brought science and love of this universe to the nation.  He gave us inspiration to continue learning about ourselves in the midst of the cosmos.

Anonymous
Reflections on a Mote of Dust
7 years ago

http://obs.nineplanets.org/psc/pbd.html

We succeeded in taking that picture [from deep space], and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there on a mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.

The earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and in triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us. It's been said that astronomy is a humbling, and I might add, a character-building experience. To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish that pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

--Carl Sagan

Anonymous
Carl Sagan speaks about evolution
7 years ago

Carl Sagan on evolution

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL2LzM-hmgw



This post was modified from its original form on 17 Aug, 18:22
Anonymous
Carl Sagan - Cosmos Intro
7 years ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7n71pm0K04

Still a glorious masterpiece after 27 years!

7 years ago

THANK YOU DALE,

I REALLY APPRECIATED CARL SAGAN, HE WAS A PEER (IN MY AGE BRACKET) WHO ACHIEVED SO MUCH IN SO LITTLE TIME.

HE WAS CALLED BACK SO EARLY.

KUDOS CARL. WE MISS YOU.

Anonymous
Carl Sagan Quotes - from Wikiquote
7 years ago
* It seems to me what is called for is an exquisite balance between two conflicting needs: the most skeptical scrutiny of all hypotheses that are served up to us and at the same time a great openness to new ideas … If you are only skeptical, then no new ideas make it through to you … On the other hand, if you are open to the point of gullibility and have not an ounce of skeptical sense in you, then you cannot distinguish the useful ideas from the worthless ones. o "The Burden of Skepticism" (1987) * "Humans -- who enslave, castrate, experiment on, and fillet other animals -- have had an understandable penchant for pretending animals do not feel pain. A sharp distinction between humans and 'animals' is essential if we are to bend them to our will, make them work for us, wear them, eat them -- without any disquieting tinges of guilt or regret. It is unseemly of us, who often behave so unfeelingly toward other animals, to contend that only humans can suffer. The behavior of other animals renders such pretensions specious. They are just too much like us." o -- Dr. Carl Sagan & Dr. Ann Druyan "Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors" (1992) * The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key. o "Wonder and Skepticism", Skeptical Enquirer Volume 19, Issue 1, (January-February 1995) * I try not to think with my gut. If I'm serious about understanding the world, thinking with anything besides my brain, as tempting as that might be, is likely to get me into trouble. o When asked a question to which he didn't know the answer and after he firmly said so and the questioner persisted: 'But what is your gut feeling?' [1] * "...that kind of skeptical questioning, don't accept what authority tells you -attitude of science- is also nearly identical to the attitude of mind necessary for a functioning democracy. Science and democracy have very consonant values and approaches, and I don't think you can have one without the other." o Talk of the Nation, 3 May 1996 * If we long for our planet to be important, there is something we can do about it. We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and by the depth of our answers. o From Cosmos Page 193
Anonymous
7 years ago
I miss Carl Sagan's influence on the scientific community. He peaked my interests in astronomy.

He was brilliant as an author. I particularly enjoyed three books, Contact, Dragons of Eden and Broca's Brain.