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2 years ago

Wolf Facts Did you know these Wolf Facts?

  • wsppup.jpgLoss of habitat and persecution by Humans are leading factors in the Wolves "Endangered Species Status".   This protection had been removed in Montana and Idaho in 2009 but reinstated in August of 2010.
  • Wolves lost the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in Idaho and Montana in 2009 but Federal protection was reinstated in August of 2010.  
  • In 2009 hunting of Wolves during specified seasons and in certain areas is now legal in Idaho and Montana.  This is unprecedented in the history of the ESA.
  • The weight of the North American Wolf can be as little as 40 pounds or as large as 175 pounds.
  • The length of the North American Wolf varies between 4'6" and 6'6" from muzzle to tip of tail.
  • The height of an average Wolf is between 26 and 32 inches at the shoulder.
  • Wolves have large feet, the average being 4 inches wide by 5 inches long.
  • Wolves can live up to 13 years in the wild but the average is only 6 to 8 years.
  • Wolves in captivity have been known to live up to 16 years.
  • Wolves have 42 teeth.
  • Wolves breed once a year, December through March, depending on latitude, the gestation period is 63 days.
  • Wolf pups are born in northern climates as late as early June and in southern climates as early as late February
  • The average litter size is 4 to 6 cubs.
  • The cubs weigh approximately one pound at birth and cannot see or hear.
  • Fur color varies from gray, tan and brown to pure white or black.
  • Packs can have as little as 2 members or as many as 30 members. Average Pack size is 6 to 8.
  • Pack Territories vary with location. In the Alaskan or Canadian Wilderness the territory for one pack ranges from 300 to 1,000 square miles while in the continental U.S. the territory is between 25 and 150 square miles.
  • A Wolf in a hurry can go as fast as 35 miles per hour for short distances.
  • The Wolves' diet of choice consists of deer, moose, caribou, elk, bison, musk-oxen and beaver. They have been know to survive on voles and mice if need be.

wspnikoakni.jpg

2 years ago


Wolf Pictures, Wa-ta-chee - these are Wolf pictures of our Alpha Male taken at Wolf Howl Animal Preserve beginning in July of 2008.

Wolf Pictures, Ohoyo - these are recent pictures of our Alpha Female Wolf, Ohoyo.

Wolf Pictures, Waya - see the pictures of our subordinate Wolf, Waya.

Wolf Pictures, Niko Akni - Wolf pictures of our yearling Male Pup, Niko.

Wolf pictures, Woha - see the pictures of the darling little girl Wolf we've named Woha.

Wolf pictures, Chito - see our beautiful yearling female Wolf in these pictures.

Wolf pictures, Nita - these Wolf pictures are of our Omega, Nita.  She is a yearling Wolf pup and a very funny girl.

2 years ago

Our Story

Our Siberian Husky Niko It all began with a purchase of a Siberian Husky Pup, Niko. I began researching and learning as much as I could about the breed. I scoured the library and searched the Internet. I soon discovered that these dogs displayed, more so than other breeds, characteristics of "The Wolf". Now, I'm sure that most of you have heard that our domestic dog's primary descendant was the Wolf. It's hard to imagine that a poodle or pug could share common genes with Canis Lupus, but not so hard to imagine a Siberian doing the same.

Wolves were mentioned in almost all of the material I read regarding Huskies. It sparked my curiosity and my search for information took on a new vein. I read everything I could about Wolves. I read fact and historic fiction. I was fascinated and at the same time saddened by their plight. This great predator was in danger of becoming extinct. I began to look for ways to defend this creature, whom I have never met. I made donations, signed petitions and searched for things that I could do to secure their future on this planet. It was during this search that I met my first Wolf.

I discovered a wonderful facility that provided a home to Wolves and they were open to the Public. My husband, Don and I made the trek from Wisconsin to Indiana to check it out. We were impressed with what we found. The facility had a pack of Wolves in a seven-acre enclosure that sported a lake. They also had separate enclosures for older Wolves or ones that could no longer hack the life in a pack. They conducted wonderfully informative tours and different lectures throughout the day. These were all given in an environment where you could observe the Wolves while you listened.


The facility has a "Howl Night". As the sun set over the park, the wolves became active and we were able to observe them from our bleacher seats located outside of the main pack enclosure. We witnessed evidence of the pecking order, watching as the Alpha chased off the Omega. A game of chase ensued with other pack members. There was a lot of tail biting and roughhousing going on. My every sense was filled with the spirit of the "Wolf".

The Alpha Male started to howl and soon the rest of the pack responded. The cool night air was filled with the most beautiful, yet eerie sound. That sound was the most phenomenal song that I have ever heard. It entered through my ears, quickly spreading over my body causing goose bumps to appear on my skin. The chorus of howls continued and settled in my heart, where it has never left. I cannot say enough about a Wolf's Howl. It's impossible to describe while doing it justice. You have to hear their voices for yourself and feel them reach into your soul. Our visit to this Wolf facility further instilled in me the desire to work for and with these amazing animals.

 I quite accidentally stumbled upon a facility about an hour's drive from my home where seventeen Wolves were housed. I decided to volunteer my services. Within two weeks, I was conducting tours and in another week care taking of the Wolves. My relationship with these shy creatures grew as I spent more time around them. They greeted me with a chorus howl when I arrived in the morning to prepare their meals and clean their enclosures. It made getting up at 4:00am all worth while. I found myself chipping away at frozen scat and emptying water buckets while braving the cold Wisconsin winters. I would sweat in the heat while combating millions of mosquitoes during the summer. Working with these amazing Wolves led Don and me to our decision, to provide a safe haven and educational facility on our own land. The gears started turning.

Wolf Preserve Don "left a good job in the city working for the man both night and day", and we loaded up the truck and moved to Mississippi. Why Mississippi..........you ask? Well, we searched for almost two years for land that was large enough and also affordable. We found just that in Mississippi. It was the perfect place for our Animal Preserve. Wolf Howl Animal Preserve is officially in Pinedale, in the northeastern part of the state located right at the foot of the Holly Springs National Forest. Wolf Howl has approximately thirty-three acres in woods and seven acres in open field. There is a large, deep creek that runs through the center of the property and extends through the entire width. There are huge boulders nestled in the woods where Wolves would love to sunbathe and plenty of large trees, foliage and vegetation.

wsppup2.jpgWe are happy to report that we have put up our first large Wolf enclosure in September of 2005 and three wonderful Wolf pups have come to claim it as their territory!  Meet Our Wolves and listen to them howl.

On a sad note, our oldest Alpha Siberian Huskie, Niko, passed away shortly before the 2007 Wolf pups were born at the Preserve.  He will live on forever at Wolf Howl Animal Preserve in spirit, as he was the reason for all of this.

      Best Regards,
      Nakoo Wolf

2 years ago

Wolf Talk

wspohoyohowl2.jpgWolves express themselves in many ways. There is the howl-bark, which is usually a distress call. It starts out as a high pitched bark and quickly turns into a short howl. It's a "Wolf Alarm", a warning to pack mates of possible danger. There are the yips, yaps, squeals, and chirps of play. These sounds are also used to show submissiveness to higher ranking pack members. The Wolf Growl is distinctive. It is a very bass sound, which emits from deep inside the animal. It is a warning that should be taken seriously. The Wolf Howl is harmonic. The howl usually shifts pitches to achieve a discord. It is believed that this is done to confuse unwelcome visitors as to the actual size of the pack. It appears that Wolves love a good Howl. I personally have seen wolves stop what they were doing, no matter how involved they were to join in a hearty chorus howl. I have seen them Howl upon awakening, to attract a mate, to let pack members know where they are at the moment and just to send a greeting. While I was working with wolves, I heard them react to sirens with a howl. In the wild, Wolves howl to scare prey, hoping it will come out of hiding. They also Howl when they are distressed by something but not enough to flee. Wolves seem to Howl frequently before a hunt. You can liken this to a human "Sports Rally". Under ideal weather conditions, a Howl can be heard for up to ten miles away from the source.

Listen to Wolf Howl Animal Preserve's Wolves, Watachee, Waya and Ohoyo participating in an evening chorus howl, one of their first!
WolfHowlWolves2
WolfHowlWolves

Here is a Midnight howl recorded in January of 2011 during the peak of their breeding season.  The deeper howls are from Wa-ta-chee and Waya.  The higher pitched sounds are from Woha and Niko Akni.  Nita can be heard in a chatter, too.

allthree.jpgBelow is a link to an mp.3 of our Wolves howling, recorded on December 27, 2006.  The howl is in response to a coyote that is approximately 2 miles away from the Preserve.  If you turn up your speakers, you will hear the coyote in the distance soon joined by a pack of coyotes.  Our Wolves howls become frenzied and excited.  The Wolf starting this howl is Waya.  Breeding season has started, our female, Ohoyo is in proestrus and we've seen wild coyotes coming into the Preserve during daylight hours.  We suspect that Waya is communicating with a young female that we've spotted at the edge of the woods.  This sound file runs approximately 6 minutes.

Looking for Love, howl

Here is a video of our Wolf Pups, Niko Akni, Chito,
Woha and Nita howling at 18 days old.

Here is a sample of one of our Wolves, Ohoyo in a distress howl, called a "bark-howl".  She wasn't happy with the presence of a female visitor at the Preserve.  You will hear her speaking to Ohoyo as she distress howls.  This is a video link of the bark-howl and may take awhile to load.  Here is just an audio sample of the distress howl that will load much quicker.

We have recorded a CD of our Wolves howling called, Wolf Songs.  If you are interested in hearing 48 minutes of pure Wolf howls, growls and sounds, click here to purchase our Wolf Howl CD.  The audio quality is the best digitally recorded howl CD I've heard to date.

Three of our Wolves, Wa-ta-chee, Ohoyo and Waya are sharing their songs in the PBS Special, The National Parks: America's Best Idea airing September of

2 years ago

Wolf Facts Did you know these Wolf Facts?

  • wsppup.jpgLoss of habitat and persecution by Humans are leading factors in the Wolves "Endangered Species Status".   This protection had been removed in Montana and Idaho in 2009 but reinstated in August of 2010.
  • Wolves lost the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in Idaho and Montana in 2009 but Federal protection was reinstated in August of 2010.  
  • In 2009 hunting of Wolves during specified seasons and in certain areas is now legal in Idaho and Montana.  This is unprecedented in the history of the ESA.
  • The weight of the North American Wolf can be as little as 40 pounds or as large as 175 pounds.
  • The length of the North American Wolf varies between 4'6" and 6'6" from muzzle to tip of tail.
  • The height of an average Wolf is between 26 and 32 inches at the shoulder.
  • Wolves have large feet, the average being 4 inches wide by 5 inches long.
  • Wolves can live up to 13 years in the wild but the average is only 6 to 8 years.
  • Wolves in captivity have been known to live up to 16 years.
  • Wolves have 42 teeth.
  • Wolves breed once a year, December through March, depending on latitude, the gestation period is 63 days.
  • Wolf pups are born in northern climates as late as early June and in southern climates as early as late February
  • The average litter size is 4 to 6 cubs.
  • The cubs weigh approximately one pound at birth and cannot see or hear.
  • Fur color varies from gray, tan and brown to pure white or black.
  • Packs can have as little as 2 members or as many as 30 members. Average Pack size is 6 to 8.
  • Pack Territories vary with location. In the Alaskan or Canadian Wilderness the territory for one pack ranges from 300 to 1,000 square miles while in the continental U.S. the territory is between 25 and 150 square miles.
  • A Wolf in a hurry can go as fast as 35 miles per hour for short distances.
  • The Wolves' diet of choice consists of deer, moose, caribou, elk, bison, musk-oxen and beaver. They have been know to survive on voles and mice if need be.

wspnikoakni.jpg

2 years ago

An early Spring in 2007 brought Wolf Howl Animal Preserve a special treat. Four new Wolf pups were born to Ohoyo and Wa-ta-chee, our Alpha Female and Male. See the Wolf Pup Video of Ohoyo and her pups shortly after their birth. The Pups were pulled from the den at 8 days old due to expected heavy rains and the chance of the pups drowning in their den.  They were all good size pups, the smallest being 2 lbs 5 oz. and the largest 2 lbs 12 oz. There were three females Wolf Pups and one male Wolf pup.

The pups were brought into the nursery where they were hand-raised and bottle-fed to socialize them to humans.* This makes their lives in captivity less stressful and in routine medical procedures and emergencies makes treating the Wolf so much easier. After a short period of time, 3 months, they were returned to the main enclosure to live with their Wolf Mother, Wolf Father and rest of the pack. The Wolf pups spent some of their time living in the home of the Founder and her Husband, Maria and Donald Ferguson. Some of the evenings had been too chilly to keep the nursery at 80 degrees which is required until the pups can regulate their own temperatures. That was a very eye opening experience for the caretakers and pups alike. They have bonded nicely and enjoyed their cuddly home in a lambswool lined garden tub. Meal times allowed them to explore the kitchen and adjacent rooms of the home. When they were in the nursery, they could climb up onto the mattress where the caretakers slept with them and explore the building which is 12x20. They had their own fenced in yard to play in when the weathered permitted.   Check out a video of the Wolf pups at 4 weeks old. 

Since our Wolf pups are now 2 years old, we've included their grown up pictures and stories in Meet Our Wolves!  On this Wolf Pups Page you can enjoy pictures of them from the time they were pulled from the den, while they were being socialized to humans and when they were returned to the pack.

                                             Wolf mom and pups picture

   wolf pups pulled from den picture

wolf pup out of den picture

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

wolf pups pulled from den picture   wolf pups pulled from den photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

wolf pups pulled from den picture   male wolf pup photo 13 days old

                  female wolf pup 13 days old

2 years ago

Once virtually wiped off the map by decades of hunting, trapping, and poisoning, wolf numbers are slowly rising thanks to recovery efforts.
Take Action! Tell President Obama to stop a deadly policy to eliminate federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming and allow shoot-on-sight killing of wolves and their pups in most of the state.
Keep up to date on actions you can take to help wolves and make a difference on other environmental issues. Subscribe to updates from Earthjustice today!

2 years ago

Featured Stories
Since our founding more than four decades ago, Earthjustice has fought to protect hundreds of special places and wildlife species. And while every victory that preserves a national park or saves an endangered species is a significant accomplishment, some animals we defend are iconic symbols of the wild. Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than in the case of the Northern Rockies gray wolves.
On August 31, 2012, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced it is eliminating federal protections for Wyoming wolves, handing wolf management over to Wyoming, which will open almost all of the state to immediate, unconditional wolf killing.
Wolf 253 was one of the first casualties as the federal government stripped Endangered Species protections for gray wolves in the northern Rockies. But this particular wolf was unique.
Explore the history of the northern Rocky gray wolves, beginning in the 1930s when their numbers were decimated after years of persecution, through their successful reintroduction in the 1990s, to current day's first legal wolf hunt in the northern Rockies in nearly a century.

2 years ago

2 years ago

Southern Rockies Wolf Restoration Project rockywolf.org

The Southern Rocky Mountains need wolves! Successfully restoring wolves to their ecological role in the Southern Rocky Mountains [a vast region that includes most of western Colorado and northwestern New Mexico hinges on you and your fellow citizens becoming engaged in the issue. Our vision of wolves roaming the hunting grounds of their ancestors in the Southern Rockies can’t succeed without your involvement and energy.

California Wolf Center

californiawolfcenter.org

The California Wolf Center is a 501(c)(3) non-profit wildlife education center committed to increasing public awareness and understanding of the importance of all wildlife by focusing on the history, biology, behavior, and ecology of the gray wolf (Canis lupus). This is accomplished by offering engaging educational presentations, participating in conservations programs, and hosting and funding research on both captive and free-ranging wolves.

Pacific Wild

www.pacificwild.org

Pacific Wild is a conservation voice dedicated to ensuring that the Great Bear Rainforest remains one of the planet’s greatest cradles of biodiversity. This is an excellent website devoted to the protection of British Columbia, and the “last wild wolves”, grizzly bears, and other wildlife that make their home there.

Humane Society

humanesociety.org

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest and most effective animal protection organization—backed by 11 million Americans, or one in every 28. Established in 1954, The HSUS seeks a humane and sustainable world for all animals—a world that will also benefit people.

Trophic Cascades Report

cof.orst.edu/cascades/index.php

Research and educational program at Oregon State University with the purpose of investigating the role of predators in structuring ecological communities. This program puts special emphasis on the role of potential keystone species in top-down community regulation, with linkages to biodiversity via trophic cascades.

MAINE WOLF COALITION

http://mainewolfcoalition.org/

The Maine Wolf Coalition is dedicated in its efforts to return the Eastern gray wolf back into Maine and the northeast habitat.  Please support their efforts by visiting their website.

 

Yoshihito  Shibata  Photography “Yoshi” has a beautiful collection of photography and we highly recommend visiting his website!

http://www.aikiyoshi.com/

 

2 years ago

Alaska Wildlife Alliance

http://www.akwildlife.org/

Founded in 1978, the Alaska Wildlife Alliance is the only group in Alaska solely dedicated to the protection of Alaska’s wildlife. Our mission is the protection of Alaska’s natural wildlife for its intrinsic value as well as for the benefit of present and future generations. The Alliance is your voice for promoting an ecosystem approach to wildlife management that represents the non-consumptive values of wildlife. AWA was founded by Alaskans and depends on the grassroots support and activism of its members.

RED  WOLF COALITION

 

 

connecting people, places, and red wolves http://redwolves.com/rwc/index.html

 

 

Wildlife Along The Rockies

wildlifealongtherockies.homestead.com

An incredible website of Dan and Cindy Hartman’s wildlife photography as their studio is nestled right outside the northeast entrance to Yellowstone National Park. Dan’s wildlife journal is a must read as he offers some great accounts of wildlife viewing and encounters!

Wolves and Moose of Isle Royale

isleroyalewolf.org/wolfhome/home.html

The wolves, the moose, and their interactions have been studied continuously and intensively since 1958. This is the longest study of any predator-prey system in the world. Great work is done here presently by Project leaders Rolf Peterson and John Vucetich.

US Fish and Wildlife

fws.gov/midwest/wolf/aboutwolves/wolfrecoveryna.htm

On the website under this link is a great link covering all the wolves of north America and what they do. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Western Watersheds

westernwatersheds.org/wildlife/wolves
The mission of Western Watersheds Project is to protect and restore western watersheds and wildlife through education, public policy initiatives and litigation.

Western Wolves

westernwolves.org/
Western Wolf Coalition works with biologists, hunters, ranchers, tribal leaders and other citizens to inform the public about wolf behavior and patterns, and reduce wolf-related conflicts. Our goal? To ensure a healthy, sustainable population of wolves managed responsibly by the states in the same way other game species have been managed for decades.

TRAP FREE NEW MEXICO…

http://www.trapfreenm.org/

A site dedicated to banning traps on public lands in New Mexico. Also a link to their Facebook site.  Very important work by very dedicated advocates!

 

Jimmy Jones Photography

Most of my work is wildlife. Although I do other genres. My preference is North American predators. The favorite being gray wolves. My love for wolves goes back to when I was a boy, I have always found them facinating. Having shot at various locations, I have found the choice location for wolves, grizzlies, and other large animals is Yellowstone.

 http://jimmyjonesphotography.com/

 

 Wolf and Wildlife Studies  http://www.wolfandwildlifestudies.com/index.php   “Learning to Live with Wildlife.”   Wolf & Wildlife Studies is an organization owned and operated by Jay Mallonee, and is dedicated to educating the public about the environment. This occurs through ongoing field research of northwest Montana’s wolves, including the nine year study of the Fishtrap wolf pack…..

 

Coyotes-wolves-cougars.blogspot.com

…is a site that invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on the suite of native animals(predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our “Wild America” as we

2 years ago

Oregon Wild

http://www.oregonwild.org/

Founded in 1974, Oregon Wild works to protect and restore Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife and waters as an enduring legacy for all Oregonians. Highly recommended by NWC  for their work with wolves and their habitat.

 

 

 

Alliance for the Wild Rockies

wildrockiesalliance.org

Works to protect wilderness, wild and scenic rivers, and biological corridors in the US northern Rockies. The Alliance is committed to see wolf recovery through—from the first mention and repercussions of the reintroduction …

Yellowstone Wolf Project

 

http://www.nps.gov/yell/naturescience/wolves.htm

The National Park Service’s report on wolves in the park.  Doug Smith signed on with Yellowstone’s wolf project in 1994 as a field biologist, and two years later became the project leader, following Mike Phillips. It’s been an opportunity to study wolf behavior while restoring an essential component to the natural world, he says. they study wolf behavior in Yellowstone National Park and serve as a catalyst in wolf behavior and research…The Yellowstone Wolf Genome Project

www.supportwolfgenomics.orgROJECT OVERVIEW:

The highly successful reintroduction of western gray wolves to native habitats in Central Idaho (CID) and Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is testimony to how well a scientifically-based and carefully executed plan can succeed. The plan unfolded in large, high quality ecosystems that allowed wolves to flourish in the Northern Rocky Mountains, which began with 66 founding wolves with the initial reintroduction, and now estimated to be approximately 1,700. The challenge moving forward is the creation of wolf management plans that are viable, both biologically and politically. A critical issue all plans must address is the overall genetic health of the entire population. In fact, the recovery plan for delisting the wolf of the Northern Rockies required that populations be connected by genetically effective migration so that genes important to adaptation could be preserved and inbreeding minimized.

“Please visit our website www.supportwolfgenomics.org to learn more about The Yellowstone Wolf Genome Project and how you can help to support the project with your generous donation”

“Mollies pack (photo credit: D. Stahler, NP

 

International Wolf Center

www.wolf.org

The International Wolf Center advances the survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wild lands and the human role in their future.

Wildlife Science Center

http://www.wildlifesciencecenter.org/

Through its research and educational efforts, the WSC’s expertise is often sought by international, national, and regional institutions regarding the care, handling, breeding, and ecological significance of wolves.

LINKS AND RESOURCES AND INFORMATION{#1}
2 years ago
| ANIMAL STUFF

Defenders of Wildlife

www.defendersofwildlife.com

Defenders and many other conservation organizations have been working tirelessly on wolf conservation in North America from aerial hunting in Alaska to restoration efforts in the lower 48 States. Wolves are an integral part of an ecosystem as a top tier predator and Defenders will continue to make sure this iconic symbol of America always has a place here.

Wolf Tracker

wolftracker.com

Dr. Nathan Varley and biologist Linda Thurston’s expertly guided trips into Yellowstone to observe wolves and other wildlife, combined with educational classes. Join them for an adventure of a lifetime. They also offer amazing content and resources on their website!
Park native Nathan Varley, Phd, and wolf behavior expert, Linda Thurston, MS, have been tracking and observing wolves since their reintroduction in 1995. They host group and individual wolf watching programs for every season.    Highly recommended !

Wolf Conservation Center

nywolf.org

Founded in 1999. The Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) is a 501c3 organization that promotes wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment, and the human role in
protecting their future

National Wolfwatcher Coalition is a strong supporter of the WCC!

This is an amazing Center as it offers educational classes and wolf viewing, and also serves as a major wolf recovery center for the Mexican gray wolf and the Red wolf. Join Maggie Howell and staff for a complete Wolf Center experience.

WILDEARTH GUARDIANS WildEarth Guardians works to protect and restore wildlife, wild places and wild rivers in the American West

 

 

 

Lobos of the Southwest

mexicanwolves.org

A great website devoted to the Mexican Gray wolf…

Mexicanwolves.org is a collaborative effort of local, regional, and national conservation, scientific and sportsmen’s organizations, and concerned citizens using the Internet to help save the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

Earth Justice

www.earthjustice.org

Environmental Law: Because the Earth Needs a Good …
Non-profit environmental law firm dedicated to protecting the natural environment, especially in the American West. Includes policy and legislation … Great work for the continued protection of wildlife!

nrdc.org

The Natural Resources Defense Council works to protect wildlife and wild places and to ensure a healthy environment for all life on earth.

Oregon Wild

http://www.oregonwild.org/

Founded in 1974, Oregon Wild works to protect and restore Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife and waters as an enduring legacy for all Oregonians. Highly recommended by NWC  for their work with wolves and their habitat.