START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
Group Discussions
label:  
  HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS
| track thread
« Back to topics
HANGMAN GAME #137
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!

 

Players please wait for George to post.  Have a great day!

 

ps.   FOR OUR NEW PLAYERS - YOU CAN GUESS 1 LETTER ONLY BEFORE GEORGE ANSWERS - ONCE HE DOES YOU CAN GUESS ANOTHER.  THANKS,

2 years ago

Late start sorry - aqua and gym day.

 

This one has personal meaning.

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

Have a good day George.

T please.

2 years ago

E George???  Hope you slept well.

2 years ago

letter A please

2 years ago

TEA  - hope you're not tea party supporters. Good guesses.

 

No Val, pain makes sleep fitful. Hoping the op will fix that.

 

_ _ _ E _ E A T E _

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Hello, everyone. Hope you are all well

 

O, George?

Anonymous
2 years ago

R please.

2 years ago

O and R both good.

 

Tomorrow's Australia Day, our July 4th. Won't be at pc much.

 

_ O _ E _ E A T E R

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,P,Q,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

good morning, letter N please

2 years ago

Hows about a Y?

 

Happy Australia Day George... and Fred!

 

{Tis a wombat, lol}

Anonymous
2 years ago

Honeyeater.....a bird.

2 years ago

Sounds good Brenda -

2 years ago

PS - I HAVE MORE OBLIGATIONS AT HOME NOW AND NEED TO GET MY CRAFTS OUT ON THE NET MORE TO SELL - THAT MEANS I HAVE LESS TIME ON CARE2 AND NEED TO FIND WAYS TO CUT BACK -


SO:  IS THERE ANYONE WHO WOULD BE WILLING TO POST THE INFORMATION ONCE GUESSED - GEORGE TRIED BUT HAD TOO MANY DIFFICULTIES - COULD BE THE WINNER OF THE GAME OR WE CAN TAKE TURNS - THOUGH THAT MIGHT GET CONFUSING AND GEORGE ARE YOU LEAVING TO GO SOMEWHERE NEXT MONTH STILL - IF SO NEED SOMEONE TO RUN THE GAME -


I WANT TO KEEO THIS GROUP GOING BUT WILL ASK - DOES ANYONE WANT TO HOST IT?  I WILL NOT LET IT JUST GO - THERE'S LOTS OF GOOD NEW/PETITIONS HERE AND I HAVE SOME GREAT FRIENDS.  BUT NEED TO THROW OUT THIS IDEA - WILL POST UNDER CO-HOSTS NEEDED AS WELL.  THANKS.!

2 years ago

Congratulations again Brenda!

 

I chose honeyeater as every year for the last few  years a honeyeater builds her nest on a chain hanging from a steel girder as part of my back porch roof. Last week I thought mum had done her bizo and the nest was deserted, but a friend who's taller than me saw a chick in it, and moments later mum popped by to feed it. Beautiful to watch. The birds are barely an inch long.

 

I'm off in about 3 weeks to get a new hip, out of action for about 2 months. 

Anonymous
2 years ago

Glad you still have your Honeyeater George.

Also pleased you are getting your new hip, 2 months is a long time but it will be worth it. Take care.

2 years ago

Honeyeater

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Honeyeaters Female Crescent Honeyeater, Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves Order: Passeriformes Suborder: Passeri Superfamily: Meliphagoidea Family: Meliphagidae
Vigors, 1825
2 years ago

The honeyeaters are a large and diverse family of small to medium sized birds most common in Australia and New Guinea, but also found in New Zealand, the Pacific islands as far east as Samoa and Tonga, and the islands to the north and west of New Guinea known as Wallacea. Bali, on the other side of the Wallace Line, has a single species.

Honeyeaters and the Australian chats make up the family Meliphagidae. In total there are 182 species in 42 genera, roughly half of them native to Australia, many of the remainder occupying New Guinea. With their closest relatives, the Maluridae (Australian fairy-wrens), Pardalotidae (pardalotes), and Acanthizidae (thornbills, Australian warblers, scrubwrens, etc.) they comprise the superfamily Meliphagoidea and originated early in the evolutionary history of the oscine passerine radiation.[4]

Although honeyeaters look and behave very much like other nectar-feeding passerines around the world (such as the sunbirds and flowerpeckers), they are unrelated, and the similarities are the consequence of convergent evolution.

The extent of the evolutionary partnership between honeyeaters and Australasian flowering plants is unknown, but probably substantial. A great many Australian plants are fertilised by honeyeaters, particularly the Proteaceae, Myrtaceae, and Epacridaceae. It is known that the honeyeaters are important in New Zealand as well, and assumed that the same applies in other areas.

 

2 years ago
Characteristics
A female Eastern Spinebill feeding. Honeyeaters typically hang from branches while feeding on nectar.

Unlike the hummingbirds of America, honeyeaters do not have extensive adaptations for hovering flight, though smaller members of the family do hover hummingbird-style to collect nectar from time to time. In general, honeyeaters prefer to flit quickly from perch to perch in the outer foliage, stretching up or sideways or hanging upside down at need. Many genera have a highly developed brush-tipped tongue, longer in some species than others, frayed and fringed with bristles which soak up liquids readily. The tongue is flicked rapidly and repeatedly into a flower, the upper mandible then compressing any liquid out when the bill is closed. These birds are one of only a few birds in the world that can fly backwards. This is because of their special wings.

In addition to nectar, all or nearly all honeyeaters take insects and other small creatures, usually by hawking, sometimes by gleaning. A few of the larger species, notably the White-eared Honeyeater, and the Strong-billed Honeyeater of Tasmania, probe under bark for insects and other morsels. Many species supplement their diets with a little fruit, and a small number eat considerable amounts of fruit,[5] particularly in tropical rainforests and, oddly, in semi-arid scrubland. The Painted Honeyeater is a mistletoe specialist. Most, however, exist on a diet of nectar supplemented by varying quantities of insects. In general, the honeyeaters with long, fine bills are more nectarivorous, the shorter-billed species less so, but even specialised nectar eaters like the spinebills take extra insects to add protein to their diet when they are breeding.

The movements of honeyeaters are poorly understood. Most are at least partially mobile but many movements seem to be local, possibly between favourite haunts as the conditions change. Fluctuations in local abundance are common, but the small number of definitely migratory honeyeater species aside, the reasons are yet to be discovered. Many follow the flowering of favourite food plants. Arid zone species appear to travel further and less predictably than those of the more fertile areas. It seems probable that no single explanation will emerge: the general rule for honeyeater movements is that there is no general rule.

 

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Val.

2 years ago

My pleasure!