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HANGMAN GAME #145
3 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!

 

 

PS~ For our new members- you can guess only 1[one] letter before I answer- once I do, you can guess another. Thanks, Have a great day!

 

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z


3 years ago

Could I have an A please

3 years ago

Good Morning, David- yes- there are 2 A's

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ A _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

3 years ago

 

 

A, E

 

_ _ _ _ _ A _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
3 years ago

T please.

3 years ago

A, E, T

 

_ _ _ _ T A _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

3 years ago

You are doing great Nyack - thank you SO much....

 

How about an I???

 

 

3 years ago

You are very welcome Val-

 

A, E, T, I

 

_ _ _ _ T A I _   _ _ _ _ _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

3 years ago

I'll try S please Nyack.

 

And no, doubt I'll travel your way again. 3 things would have to happen.

 

1. The 3rd hip op is a roaring success and I can walk without too much mechanical assistance.

 

2. I've always travelled solo but I'd have to find the perfect travel partner who like me is flexible about routes, duration of stopovers, taking advantage of the moment.

 

3. A win of at least a million in Gold Lotto.

 

.......almost forgot 4. A cat sitter who'll give Fred the love and attention he so richly deserves.

 

Miracles do happen.

3 years ago

How about a R please. R as in right which i hope i am

3 years ago

VAL! Im sorry, I made a mistake, there WAS another I!

 

George, nice to see you still here playing a bit. Yes, miracles DO happen,~ you just may to make it to NY for a 3rd time! Never say never!

 

 

 

A, E, T, I, S, R

 

_ _ _ _ T A I _   _ _ R I _ _ 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

3 years ago

TAI. Would an L follow?

3 years ago

Could I please have an L? (Fingers X!!)

3 years ago

A, E, T, I, S, R, L

 

_ _ _ _ T A I _   _ _ R I L L

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,J,K,M,N,O,P,Q,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
3 years ago

Know it but will pass this time!

3 years ago

I will try an S this time.

3 years ago

Mountain Gorilla?????

3 years ago

CONGRATULATIONS, VAL!

3 years ago

mountaingorilla.jpg

 

 

Mountain Gorilla

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountain_Gorilla

 

The mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is one of the two subspecies of the eastern gorilla. There are two populations. One is found in the Virunga volcanic mountains of Central Africa, within three National Parks: Mgahinga, in south-west Uganda; Volcanoes, in north-west Rwanda; and Virunga in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The other is found in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. Some primatologists say that the Bwindi population in Uganda may be a separate subspecies, though no description has been finished. As of Spring 2010, the estimated total number of mountain gorillas worldwide is 790.

3 years ago

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

 

The fur of the mountain gorilla, often thicker and longer than that of other gorilla species, enables them to live in colder temperatures. Gorillas can be identified by nose prints unique to each individual. Males usually weigh twice as much as the females, and this subspecies is on average the largest of all gorillas. Adult males have more pronounced bony crests on the top and back of their skulls, giving their heads a more conical shape. These crests anchor the powerful masseter muscles, which attach to the lower jaw (mandible). Adult females also have these crests, but they are less pronounced. Like all gorillas they feature dark brown eyes framed by a black ring around the iris.

Adult males are called silverbacks because a saddle of gray or silver-colored hair develops on their backs with age. The hair on their backs is shorter than on most other body parts, and their arm hair is especially long. Fully erect, males reach 1.9 m (6 ft 3 in) in height, with an arm span of 2.3 m (7 ft 7 in) and weigh 220 kg (490 lb). The tallest silverback recorded was a 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) individual shot in Alimbongo, northern Kivu in May 1938. There's an unconfirmed record of another individual, shot in 1932, that was 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) tall. The heaviest was a 1.83 m (6 ft) silverback shot in Ambam, Cameroon which weighed about 266 kg (590 lb).

The mountain gorilla is primarily terrestrial and quadrupedal. However, it will climb into fruiting trees if the branches can carry its weight, and it is capable of running bipedally up to 6 m (20 ft). Like all great apes other than humans, its arms are longer than its legs. It moves by knuckle-walking (like the common chimpanzee, but unlike the bonobo and both orangutan species), supporting its weight on the backs of its curved fingers rather than its palms.

The mountain gorilla is diurnal, most active between 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Many of these hours are spent eating, as large quantities of food are needed to sustain its massive bulk. It forages in early morning, rests during the late morning and around midday, and in the afternoon it forages again before resting at night. Each gorilla builds a nest from surrounding vegetation to sleep in, constructing a new one every evening. Only infants sleep in the same nest as their mothers. They leave their sleeping sites when the sun rises at around 6 am, except when it is cold and overcast; then they often stay longer in their nests.

3 years ago

BEHAVIOR/ SOCIAL STRUCTURE

The mountain gorilla is highly social, and lives in relatively stable, cohesive groups held together by long-term bonds between adult males and females. Relationships among females are relatively weak. These groups are nonterritorial; the silverback generally defends his group rather than his territory. In the Virunga mountain gorillas, the average length of tenure for a dominant silverback is 4.7 years.

61% of groups are composed of one adult male and a number of females and 36% contain more than one adult male. The remaining gorillas are either lone males or exclusively male groups, usually made up of one mature male and a few younger males. Group sizes vary from five to thirty, with an average of ten individuals. A typical group contains: one dominant silverback, who is the group's undisputed leader; another subordinate silverback (usually a younger brother, half-brother, or even an adult son of the dominant silverback); one or two blackbacks, who act as sentries; three to four sexually mature females, who are ordinarily bonded to the dominant silverback for life; and from three to six juveniles and infants.

Most males, and about 60% of females, leave their natal group. Males leave when they are about 11 years old, and often the separation process is slow: they spend more and more time on the edge of the group until they leave altogether. They may travel alone or with an all-male group for 2-5 years before they can attract females to join them and form a new group. Females typically emigrate when they are about 8 years old, either transferring directly to an established group or beginning a new one with a lone male. Females often transfer to a new group several times before they settle down with a certain silverback male.

The dominant silverback generally determines the movements of the group, leading it to appropriate feeding sites throughout the year. He also mediates conflicts within the group and protects it from external threats. When the group is attacked by humans, leopards, or other gorillas, the silverback will protect them even at the cost of his own life. He is the center of attention during rest sessions, and young animals frequently stay close to him and include him in their games. If a mother dies or leaves the group, the silverback is usually the one who looks after her abandoned offspring, even allowing them to sleep in his nest. Experienced silverbacks are capable of removing poachers' snares from the hands or feet of their group members.

When the dominant silverback dies or is killed by disease, accident, or poachers, the family group may be severely disrupted. Unless he leaves behind a male descendant capable of taking over his position, the group will either split up or be taken over in its entirety by an unrelated male. When a new silverback takes control of a family group, he may kill all of the infants of the dead silverback. This practice of infanticide is an effective reproductive strategy, in that the newly acquired females are then able to conceive the new male's offspring. Infanticide has not been observed in stable groups.

3 years ago

RESEARCH

 

In October 1902, Captain Robert von Beringe (1865–1940) shot two large apes during an expedition to establish the boundaries of German East Africa. One of the apes was recovered and sent to the Zoological Museum in Berlin, where Professor Paul Matschie (1861–1926) classified the animal as a new form of gorilla and named it Gorilla beringei after the man who discovered it. In 1925 Carl Akeley, a hunter from the American Museum of Natural History who wished to study the gorillas, convinced Albert I of Belgium to establish the Albert National Park to protect the animals of the Virunga mountains.

George Schaller began his 20 month observation of the mountain gorillas in 1959, subsequently publishing two books: The Mountain Gorilla and The Year of the Gorilla. Little was known about the life of the mountain gorilla before his research, which described its social organization, life history, and ecology. Following Schaller, Dian Fossey began what would become a 18 year study in 1967. Fossey made new observations, completed the first accurate census, and established active conservation practices, such as anti-poaching patrols. The Digit Fund, which Dian Fossey started, continued her work and was later renamed the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International. The Fund's Karisoke Research Center monitors and protects the mountain gorillas of the Virungas. Close monitoring and research of the Bwindi mountain gorillas began in the 1990s.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Congratulations Val.

Thanks Nyack, they are beautiful animals!

3 years ago

THREATS

 

As with any flora and fauna, the decline of a population can usually be attributed to anthropogenic factors. Pollution, habitat destruction and fragmentation, over harvesting (in the form of illegal poaching), agriculture, and the introduction of diseases are some of the usual suspects; the mountain gorilla suffers from all of these. All of the aforementioned are due to the most significant threat to gorilla survival; human population growth

Poaching: Mountain gorillas are not usually hunted for bushmeat, but they are frequently maimed or killed by traps and snares intended for other animals. They have been killed for their heads, hands, and feet, which are sold to collectors. Infants are sold to zoos, researchers, and people who want them as pets. The abduction of infants generally involves the loss of at least one adult, as members of a group will fight to the death to protect their young. The Virunga gorillas are particularly susceptible to animal trafficking for the illegal pet trade. With young gorillas worth from $1000 to $5000 on the black market, poachers seeking infant and juvenile specimens will kill and wound other members of the group in the process. Those of the group that survive often disband. One well documented case was that known as the ‘Taiping 4’. In this situation, a Malaysian Zoo received four wild-born infant gorillas from Nigeria at a cost of US$1.6 million using falsified export documents. Poaching for meat is also particularly threatening in regions of political unrest. Most of the African great apes survive in areas of chronic insecurity, where there is a breakdown of law and order. The killing of mountain gorillas at Bikenge in Virunga National Park in January 2007 was a well documented case.

Habitat loss: This is one the most severe threats to gorilla populations. The forests where mountain gorillas live are surrounded by rapidly increasing human settlement. Through shifting (slash-and-burn) agriculture, pastoral expansion and logging, villages in forest zones cause fragmentation and degradation of habitat. The late 1960s saw the Virunga Conservation Area (VCA) of Rwanda’s national park reduced by more than half of its original size to support the cultivation of Pyrethrum. This led to a massive reduction in mountain gorilla population numbers by the mid-1970s. The resulting deforestation confines the gorillas to isolated deserts. Some groups may raid crops for food, creating further animosity and retaliation. The impact of habitat loss extends beyond the reduction of suitable living space for gorillas. As gorilla groups are increasingly geographically isolated from one another due to human settlements, the genetic diversity of each group is reduced. Some signs of inbreeding are already appearing in younger gorillas, including webbed hands and feet.

 

THREATS {continued}
3 years ago

Disease: Despite the protection garnered from being located in National parks, the mountain gorilla is also at risk from people of a more well-meaning nature. Groups subjected to regular visits from tourists and locals are at a continued risk of disease cross-transmission (Lilly et al., 2002) - this is in spite of attempts to enforce a rule that humans and gorillas be separated by a distance of 7 metres at all times to prevent this. With a similar genetic makeup to humans and an immune system that has not evolved to cope with human disease, this poses a serious conservation threat. Indeed, according to some researchers, infectious diseases (predominantly respiratory) are responsible for about 20% of sudden deaths in mountain gorilla populations. It is notable that with the implementation of a successful ecotourism program in which human-gorilla interaction was minimised, during the period of 1989-2000 four sub-populations in Rwanda experienced an increase of 76%. By contrast, seven of the commonly visited sub-populations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) saw a decline of almost 20% over only four years (1996–2000). From this, we can conclude that the negative impacts of ecotourism on gorilla health can be minimised if proper management is undertaken.

The risk of disease transmission is not limited to those of a human origin; pathogens from domestic animals and livestock through contaminated water are also a concern. Studies have found that water borne, gastrointestinal parasites such as Cryptosporidium sp., Microsporidia sp.,and Giardia sp. are genetically identical when found in livestock, humans, and gorillas; particularly along theborder of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda. Another example of human induced disease is Tuberculosis; Kabagambe et al. found that as high as 11% of cattle in Rwanda suffered from this affliction.

War and civil unrest: Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo have been politically unstable and beleaguered by war and civil unrest over the last decades. Simulation modeling, Byers et al. (2003) has suggested that times of war and unrest have negative impacts on the habitat and populations of mountain gorillas. For example, events such as 1994’s Rwanda genocide would take place approximately every 30 years, with each event lasting for 10 years. Due to the increase in human encounters, aggressive and passive alike, this would result in a rise in mortality rates and a decrease in reproductive success. More direct impacts from conflict can also be seen. Kanyamibwa notes that there were reports that mines were placed along trails in the Volcanos National Park, and that many gorillas were killed as a result. Pressure from habitat destruction in the form of logging also increased as refugees fled the cities and cut down trees for wood. During the Rwandan genocide, some poaching activity was also linked to the general breakdown of law and order and lack of any ramifications.

3 years ago

Thanks Nyack - already signed.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Already signed. Thank you Nyack.

3 years ago

Congrats Val!! Thanks for the petitions, Nyack, already signed!

3 years ago

Must've guessed L the extact time as George. Too funny! Sorry!

2 years ago

Noed info and already signed Nyack Thanx

2 years ago

Noted and signed already , Thanx Nyack