START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
Group Discussions
label:  
  HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS
| track thread
« Back to topics
HANGMAN GAME # 174
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I NEVER KNEW WHAT LETTERS TO TAKE OFF ETC. HOPE THAT MAKES SENSE!

2 years ago

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Can I have an E please Nyack ? 

2 years ago

Hello, Kay- no E

 

Letters Guessed

E

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _     _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

T Please Nyack.

2 years ago

No T, Koala

 

Letters Guessed

E, T

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available   

 

A,B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Could I pretty please have an N????

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

E, T, N, A

 

 

_ A _ _ _ _ _ N _ A    _ _ N _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

California Condor

2 years ago

CONGRATULATIONS, JOHN!

2 years ago

Well done John!

2 years ago

Help California Condors

 

PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/164/522/951/help-california-condors/

 

  • Target: Secretary of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service Southwest Region
  • Sponsored by: Animal Advocates
  •  

    Native to North America, the California condor is extremely endangered and was reduced to just 8 in the wild in 1987. They were taken into captivity and an intensive captive breeding programme has led them to being released back into the wild.


    California condors still face one of the same problems that nearly led to their extinction in the first place in 1987. Lead poisoning following ingestion of carcasses shot with lead ammunition.


    Golden eagles, peregrine falcons, loons and other birds die incredibly painful unnecessary deaths from lead poisoning. Lead ammunition is used in hunting deer, wild pig, elk, pronghorn antelope, coyotes, ground squirrels, and other non-game wildlife. Lead also threatens top predators such as wolves, bears and panthers.


    BAN LEAD IN AMMUNITION and FISHING TACKLE.

    Secretary of the Interior

    Ken Salazar

    U.S. Department of the Interior
    1849 C Street, N.W. / Washington DC 20240
    feedback@ios.doi.gov
    Secretary_of_the_Interior@ios.doi.gov

     

    Fish and Wildlife Service

    Southwest Region

    Benjamin Tuggle

    P.O. Box 1306

    Albuquerque

    New Mexico, 87103

    Phone: 5o5-248-6587

    EMail: benjamin_tuggle@fws.gov



    This post was modified from its original form on 25 Mar, 22:27
    2 years ago

    Petition signed. Thanks Nyack

    2 years ago

    California-condor-in-flight--lateral-view.jpg

     

    California Condor

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Condor

     

    The California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) is a New World vulture, the largest North American land bird. This condor inhabits only the Grand Canyon area, Zion National Park, and coastal mountains of central and southern California and northern Baja California. Although other fossil members are known, it is the only surviving member of the genus Gymnogyps.

    The plummage is black with patches of white on the underside of the wings and the head is largely bald, with skin color ranging from yellowish to bright red depending on the bird's mood. Its almost 3.0 meter wingspan is the largest of any North American bird, and its weight of up to 29 lbs. makes it second only to the Trumpeter Swan among native North American birds. The condor is a scavenger and eats large amounts of carrion. It is one of the world's longest-living birds, with a lifespan of up to 60 years.

    Condor numbers dramatically declined in the 20th century due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction. A conservation plan was put in place by the United States government that led to the capture of all 22 remaining wild condors in 1987. These surviving birds were bred at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and the Los Angeles Zoo. Numbers rose through captive breeding and, beginning in 1991, condors have been reintroduced into the wild. The project is the most expensive species conservation project ever undertaken in the United States. The California Condor is one of the world's rarest bird species: as of December 2011, there are 390 condors known to be living, including 210 in the wild.The condor is a significant bird to many Californian Native American groups and plays an important role in several of their traditional myths.

    2 years ago

    DESCRIPTION

    The adult California Condor is a uniform black, with the exception, of large triangular patches or bands of white on the underside of the wings. It has gray legs and feet, an ivory-colored bill, a frill of black feathers surrounding the base of the neck, and brownish red eyes. The juvenile is mostly a mottled dark brown with blackish coloration on the head. It has mottled gray instead of white on the underside of its flight feathers.

    As an adaptation for hygiene, the condor's head and neck have few feathers, which exposes the skin to the sterilizing effects of dehydration and solar ultraviolet light at high altitudes. The skin of the head and neck is capable of flushing noticeably in response to emotional state, a capability that can serve as communication between individuals. The skin color varies from yellowish to a glowing reddish-orange.

    Contrary to the usual rule among true birds of prey, the female is slightly smaller than the male. Overall length can range from 109–140 cm (43–55 in) and the wingspan is 2.49–3 m (8.2–9.8 ft). Their weight can range from 7–14.1 kg (15–31 lb), with estimations of average weight ranging from 8–9 kg (18–20 lb). Wingspans of up to 3.4 m (11 ft) have been reported but no wingspan over 3 m (9.8 ft) has been verified. Most measurements are from birds raised in captivity, so determining if there are any major differences in measurements between wild and captive condors is difficult.

    California Condors have the largest wingspan of any North American bird. They are surpassed in both body length and weight only by the Trumpeter Swan and the introduced Mute Swan. The American White Pelican and Whooping Crane also have longer bodies than the condor. Condors are so large that they can be mistaken for a small, distant airplane, which possibly occurs more often than they are mistaken for other species of bird.

    The middle toe of the California Condor's foot is greatly elongated, and the hind one is only slightly developed. The talons of all the toes are straight and blunt, and are thus more adapted to walking than gripping. This is more similar to their supposed relatives the storks than to birds of prey and Old World vultures, which use their feet as weapons or organs of prehension.

    2 years ago

    CONSERVATION- RECOVERY PLAN

    As the condor's population continued to decline, discussion began about starting a captive breeding program for the birds. Opponents to this plan argued that the condors had the right to freedom, that capturing all of the condors would change the species' habits forever, and that the cost was too great. However, the project received the approval of the United States government, and the capture of the remaining wild condors was completed on Easter Sunday 1987, when AC-9, the last wild condor, was captured.There were only 22 condors in existence, all in captivity.

    The goal of the California Condor Recovery Plan was to establish two geographically separate populations, one in California and the other in Arizona, each with 150 birds and at least 15 breeding pairs. As the Recovery Program works toward this goal the number of release sites has grown. There are three active release sites in California, one in Arizona and one in Baja California, Mexico.

    The captive breeding program, led by the San Diego Wild Animal Park and Los Angeles Zoo, got off to a slow start due to the condor's mating habits. However, utilizing the bird's ability to double clutch, biologists began removing the first egg from the nest and raising it with puppets, allowing the parents to lay another egg.

    As the number of condors grew, attention began to focus on releasing some back into the wild. In 1988, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service began a reintroduction experiment involving the release of captive Andean Condors into the wild in California. Only females were released, to eliminate the possibility of accidentally introducing a South American species into the United States. The experiment was a success, and all the Andean Condors were recaptured and re-released in South America. California Condors were released in 1991 and 1992 in California, and again in 1996 in Arizona near the Grand Canyon. Though the birth rate remains low in the wild, their numbers are increasing steadily through regular releases of captive-reared adolescents.

     

    The California Condor conservation project may be one of the most expensive species conservation projects in United States history, costing over $35 million, including $20 million in federal and state funding, since World War II. As of 2007 the annual cost for the condor conservation program was around $2.0 million per year. However, nesting milestones have been recently reached by the reintroduced condors. In 2003, the first nestling fledged in the wild since 1981.

    2 years ago

    CURRENT STATUS

    In modern times, a wide variety of causes have contributed to the condor's decline. Its exacting mating habits and resulting low birth rate, combined with a late age of sexual maturity, make the bird vulnerable to loss of population. Significant damage to the condor population is also attributed to poaching, especially for museum specimens, lead poisoning (from eating animals containing lead shot), DDT poisoning, electric power lines, egg collecting, and habitat destruction. During the California Gold Rush, some condors were even kept as pets.

    In addition to this, cattle ranchers who observed condors feeding on the dead young of their cattle assumed that the birds killed the cattle. This fallacy led to the condor's extinction in some parts of the western United States. This belief was so deeply ingrained that the reintroduction of condors to the Grand Canyon was challenged by some cattle ranchers, who mistakenly believed that the bird hunted calves and lambs.

    Unanticipated deaths among recent condor populations occurred due to contact with Golden Eagles, power lines, wind turbines and other factors such as lead poisoning. Since 1994, captive-bred California Condors have been trained to avoid power lines and people. Since the implementation of this aversion conditioning program, the number of condor deaths due to power lines has greatly decreased. Lead poisoning due to fragmented lead bullets in large game waste is a particularly big problem for condors due to their extremely strong digestive juices; this lead waste is not as much of a problem for other avian scavengers such as the Turkey Vulture and Common Raven. This problem has been addressed in California by the Ridley-Tree Condor Preservation Act, a bill that went into effect July 1, 2008 that requires that hunters use non-lead bullets when hunting in the condor's range.

    2 years ago

    * Despite there being a ban on lead bullets, condors are tested and STILL have lead in their systems.

    This is why I am petitioning to remove lead from ammunition altoghter.

    2 years ago

    WOW John!!!! Congrats big time!! That was fast! Petition signed for sure! Thanks Nyack and thanks for all the info!

    Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Congratulations John. Very fast!

    Signed, Thanks Nyack.

    2 years ago

    CONGRATS JOHN -

     

    SEEMS I JUST WATCH THESE GAMES FLY BY!

     

    THANKS AGAIN NYACK FOR THE INFORMATION AND THE PETITION!

    2 years ago

    Congratulations John Noted info and signed petition Nyack :-0 thanx