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HANGMAN GAME # 178
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I NEVER KNEW WHAT LETTERS TO TAKE OFF ETC. HOPE THAT MAKES SENSE!

2 years ago

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

T please Nyack.

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T

 

 

 

_ _ _ _ T _ _ _     _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T, E

 

 

 

_ _ _ _ T _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _ E _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

R please.

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T, E, R

 

 

 

_ _ _ _ T R _ _    R _ _ _ _ _ E R _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

Sumatran Rhinoceros.

2 years ago

CONGRATULATIONS, BRENDA!

 

Stop Poaching Rhinoceros

 

PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/769/022/584/stop-poaching-rhinoceros/

 

  • Target: China Minister of Finance- Director General Mr. Xiaosong Zheng, Deputy Director Ms. Jiandi Ye
  • Sponsored by: Animal Advocates
  •  

     

    The Sumatran Rhinocerous is critically endangered. Once numerous throughout Southeast Asia, fewer than 275 remain due to illegal poaching for its horn.


    Uses of the rhinoceros's body parts among the local people of Sumatra are documented, such as the use of rhino horns in amulets and a folk-belief that the horns offer some protection against poison.


    Hunting the rhino has primarily been driven by a demand for rhino horns with supposedly medicinal properties, claiming to to cure diarrhea, leprosy, tuberculosis, skin diseases and as an aphrodisiac, although traditional Chinese medicine never used it for this purpose.


    We ask the Chinese government to discourage the use of rhinoceros horns, providing alternatives to this medicine and make rhinoceros poaching a serious crime and to take a more active role in rhinocerus conservation.


    Mr. Xiaosong Zheng
    Director General
    Ministry of Finance - International Department
    Sanlihe Xicheng District
    Beijing - 100820
    China
    Tel: + 8610 6855 1122
    Fax: + 8610 6855 1125
    EMail: xs.zheng@mof.gov.cn

    Ms. Jiandi Ye

    Deputy Director
    Ministry of Finance
    IFI Division III International Department San Li He St. Xichengqu
    Beijing - 100820
    China
    Tel: + 86 10 6855-1171
    Fax: + 86 10 6855 1125
    EMail: jdye@mof.gov.cn

     

    javan_rhino.jpg

     



    This post was modified from its original form on 29 Mar, 14:13
    2 years ago

    Sumatran-rhinoceros-grazing.jpg

     

    Sumatran Rhinoceros

    http://www.arkive.org/sumatran-rhinoceros/dicerorhinus-sumatrensis/

     

    This prehistoric-looking, armour-plated giant is the most endangered of all five rhinoceros species. Despite being the smallest of all the living rhinos, the Sumatran rhinoceros is still an immense animal, with leathery, dark grey-brown skin, measuring up to 16 millimetres thick. This thick skin has a covering of reddish-brown hair, which is long and dense on calves and young adults, but becomes sparser and blacker as the rhino ages. The other rhinoceros species do not have such copious hairs, and thus the Sumatran rhinoceros is often called the ‘hairy rhino’. A large fold of skin extends across the back, behind the shoulder, and thick, wrinkles of skin encircle the eye. The Sumatran rhinoceros is the only rhino in Asia which bears two horns; in fact, the genus name Dicerorhinus comes from the Latin word for two (di), horn (ceros) and nose (rhinos). However, the second horn can be so short, rarely measuring more than ten centimetres, that often it appears to be single-horned with just the first horn, measuring up to 30 centimetres, showing clearly

    2 years ago

    Sumatran Rhinoceros

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumatran_rhinoceros

     

    The Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is a member of the family Rhinocerotidae and one of five extant rhinoceroses. It is the only extant species of the genus Dicerorhinus. It is the smallest rhinoceros, although is still a large mammal. This rhino stands 112–145 cm (3.67–4.76 ft) high at the shoulder, with a head-and-body length of 2.36–3.18 m (7.7–10.4 ft) and a tail of 35–70 cm (14–28 in). The weight is reported to range from 500 to 1,000 kg (1,100 to 2,200 lb), averaging 700–800 kg (1,500–1,800 lb), although there is a single record of a 2,000 kg (4,400 lb) specimen. Like the African species, it has two horns; the larger is the nasal horn, typically 15–25 centimetres (5.9–9.8 in), while the other horn is typically a stub. A coat of reddish-brown hair covers most of the Sumatran rhino's body.

    Members of the species once inhabited rainforests, swamps and cloud forests in India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and China. In historical times they lived in southwest China, particularly in Sichuan. They are now critically endangered, with only six substantial populations in the wild: four on Sumatra, one on Borneo, and one in the Malay Peninsula. Their numbers are difficult to determine because they are solitary animals that are widely scattered across their range, but they are estimated to number fewer than 275. Survival of the Peninsular Malaysia population is in doubt, and one of the Sumatran populations may already be extinct, total numbers today may be as low as 200. The decline in the number of Sumatran rhinoceros is attributed primarily to poaching for their horns, which are highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine, fetching as much as US$30,000 per kilogram on the black market.

    The Sumatran rhino is a mostly solitary animal except for courtship and offspring-rearing. It is the most vocal rhino species and also communicates through marking soil with its feet, twisting saplings into patterns, and leaving excrement. The species is much  is much better studied than the similarly reclusive Javan rhinoceros, in part because of a program that brought 40 Sumatran rhinos into captivity with the goal of preserving the species. The program was considered a disaster even by its initiator; most of the rhinos died and no offspring were produced for nearly 20 years, representing an even worse population decline than in the wild.

    2 years ago

    DISTRUBUTION AND HABITAT

    The Sumatran rhinoceros lives in both lowland and highland secondary rainforest, swamps and cloud forests. It inhabits hilly areas close to water, particularly steep upper valleys with a lot of undergrowth. The Sumatran rhinoceros once inhabited a continuous range as far north as Burma, eastern India and Bangladesh. Unconfirmed reports also placed it in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. All known living animals occur in Peninsular Malaysia, the island of Sumatra and Sabah, Borneo. Some conservationists hope Sumatran rhinos may still survive in Burma, though it is considered unlikely. Political turmoil in Burma has prevented any assessment or study of possible survivors. The last reports of stray animals from Indian limits were in 1990s.

    The Sumatran rhino is widely scattered across its range, much more so than the other Asian rhinos, which has made it difficult for conservationists to protect members of the species effectively. Only six areas are known to contain communities of more than a handful of Sumatran rhinoceros: Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Gunung Leuser National Park, and Way Kambas National Park on Sumatra; Taman Negara National Park in Peninsular Malaysia; and the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

    The Kerinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra's largest, was estimated to contain a population of around 500 rhinos in the 1980s, but due to poaching, this population is now considered extinct. The survival of any animals in Peninsula Malaysia is also in doubt.

    2 years ago

    CONSERVATION

    Sumatran rhinoceroses were once quite numerous throughout Southeast Asia. It is now estimated that fewer than 275 individuals remain.The species is classed as critically endangered, primarily due to illegal poaching. Until the early 1990s, the population decline was estimated at more than 50% per decade, and the small, scattered populations now face high risks of inbreeding depression. Most remaining habitat is in relatively inaccessible mountainous areas of Indonesia.

    Poaching of Sumatran rhinoceros is a cause for concern, as the price of its horn has been estimated as high as $30,000 per kilogram. This species has been overhunted for many centuries, leading to the current greatly reduced – and still declining – population.The rhinos are difficult to observe and hunt directly (one field researcher spent seven weeks in a treehide near a salt lick without ever observing a rhino directly), so poachers make use of spear traps and pit traps. In the 1970s, uses of the rhinoceros's body parts among the local people of Sumatra were documented, such as the use of rhino horns in amulets and a folk-belief that the horns offer some protection against poison. Dried rhinoceros meat was used as medicine for diarrhea, leprosy and tuberculosis. "Rhino-oil", a concoction made from leaving a rhino's skull in coconut oil for several weeks, may be used to treat skin diseases. The extent of use and belief in these practices is not known. It was once believed that rhinoceros horn was widely used as an aphrodisiac; in fact traditional Chinese medicine never used it for this purpose. Nevertheless, hunting in this species has primarily been driven by a demand for rhino horns with supposedly medicinal properties.

    The rainforests of Indonesia and Malaysia, which the Sumatran rhino inhabits, are also targets for legal and illegal logging because of the desirability of their hardwoods. Rare woods like merbau, meranti and semaram are valuable on the international markets, fetching as much as $1,800 per m3 ($1,375 per cu yd). Enforcement of illegal-logging laws is difficult because humans live within or near many of the same forests as the rhino. The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake has been used to justify new logging. Although the hardwoods in the rainforests of the Sumatran rhino are destined for international markets and not widely used in domestic construction, the number of logging permits for these woods has increased dramatically because of the tsunami. However, while it has been suggested that this species is highly sensible to habitat disturbance, it appears this is of little importance compared to hunting, as it can withstand more or less any forest condition.

    2 years ago

    Congrats Brenda and thanks for the info on the rhinos Nyack, I LOVE rhinos!!! and signed and shared petition

    2 years ago

    Well done Brenda. Petition Signed. Thanks Nyack

    Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Thank you Nicole and Joan.

    Signed. Thanks Nyack.

    2 years ago

    Congrats Brenda Thanx Nyack for info and I already signed the Petition

    Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Thanks Barbara.