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HANGMAN GAME # 203
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I NEVER KNEW WHAT LETTERS TO TAKE OFF ETC. HOPE THAT MAKES SENSE!

2 years ago

_ _ _ _ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

T please Nyack.

2 years ago

"A" Please!  Hello Brenda, Nyack & Val!  May your day be a Special one!  xx

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T, A

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ -_ _ _ _ T _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ A _ T

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

Hi Everyone How about an E please Nyack ) ) )

2 years ago

Letters Guessed

T, A, E

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ E -_ _ E _ T E _   _ _ _ _ _ _ A _ T

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

2 years ago

R please Nyack

2 years ago

"M" Please?

2 years ago

 

Letters Guessed

T, A, E, R, M

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ E -_ R E _ T E _   _ _ R M _ R A _ T

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,N,O,P,Q,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

Double Crested Cormorant....good one Nyack!

2 years ago

  CONGRATULATIONS, BRENDA!

2 years ago

Stop Bird Killing Bill

 

PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/702/786/622/stop-bird-killing-bill/

 

 

Representative John Kline, Minnesota, has introduced a bill that would amend the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to allow states to kill large populations of double-crested cormorant- "The Cormorant Management and Natural Resources Act" (H.R. 3074). The bill is based on invalid science and the misguided belief that they are "eating all the fish."

 

There is ample research that shows double-crested cormorants rarely have much effect on any fish stocks at all. In fact, double-crested cormorants actually benefit fish stocks by weeding out the unfit, and preying on predators or alien species. Double-crested cormorants also often are instrumental in helping to make soil suitable for vegetation.

 

SOURCE and Additional Petition:

https://secure3.convio.net/bfusa/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=743&JServSessionIdr004=fwu19a0um5.app334a

 

This amendment would allow states to cull large populations of double-crested cormorants. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act is a federal issue and "management" should remain a federal responsibility.

 

Please contact your Senators and ask them  to oppose the Cormorant Management and Natural Resources Act (H.R. 3074).



This post was modified from its original form on 19 May, 1:14
2 years ago

 

Double-crested Cormorant

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-crested_Cormorant

 

The Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. It occurs along inland waterways as well as in coastal areas, and is widely distributed across North America, from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska down to Florida and Mexico. Measuring 70–90 cm (28–35 in) in length, it is an all-black bird which gains a small double crest of black and white feathers in breeding season. It has a bare patch of orange-yellow facial skin. Five subspecies are recognized.

The Double-crested Cormorant is found near rivers, lakes and along the coastline. It mainly eats fish and hunts by swimming and diving. Its feathers, like those of all cormorants, are not waterproof and it must spend time drying them out after spending time in the water. Once threatened by use of DDT, the numbers of this bird have increased markedly in recent years.

2 years ago

 

DESCRIPTION

The Double-crested Cormorant is a large waterbird with a stocky body, long neck, medium-sized tail, webbed feet and a medium sized hooked bill. It has a body length of between 70–90 cm (28–35 in) long, with a wingspan of between 114–123 cm (45–48 in).Double-crested Cormorants weigh between 1.2–2.5 kg (2.6–5.5 pounds) Males and females do not display sexual dimorphism.

This species has dark-colored plumage with bare super-loral skin and gular skin that is yellow or orange. An adult in breeding plumage will be mostly black with the back and coverts being a dark grayish towards the center. Nuptial crests, for which the species is named, are either white, black or a mix of the two. These are located just above the eyes with the bare skin on the face of a breeding adult being orange. A non-breeding adult will lack the crests and have more yellowish skin around the face. The bill of the adult is dark-colored. The Double-crested Cormorant is very similar in appearance to the larger Great Cormorant, which has a more restricted distribution in North America, mainly on the Canadian maritime provinces; it can, however, be separated by having more yellow on the throat and the bill.

The plumage of juvenile Double-crested Cormorants is more dark grey or brownish. The underparts of a juvenile are lighter than the back with a pale throat and breast that darkens towards the belly. As a bird ages, its plumage will grow darker. The bill of a juvenile will be mostly orange or yellowish.

2 years ago

DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT

A very common and widespread species, it winters anywhere that is ice-free along both coasts, as far north as southern Alaska (on the west coast) and southern New England (on the east coast). It can be found as far south as Mexico and the Bahamas. It migrates from the coldest parts of its breeding range, such as eastern Canada, and has occurred in Europe as a very rare vagrant, for example in Great Britain, Ireland, and the Azores.

2 years ago

RECOVERY

The Double-crested Cormorant's numbers decreased in the 1960s due to the effects of DDT. Colonies have also been persecuted from time to time in areas where they are thought to compete with human fishing.

Recently the population of Double-crested Cormorants has increased. Some studies have concluded that the recovery was allowed by the decrease of contaminants, particularly the discontinued use of DDT. The population may have also increased because of aquaculture ponds in its southern wintering grounds. The ponds favor good over-winter survival and growth.

In 1894, Thomas McIlwraith in his book, Birds of Ontario, concludes his section on Double-crested Cormorants by saying: “When the young are sufficiently grown, they gather into immense flocks in unfrequented sections, and remain until the ice-lid has closed over their food supply, when they go away, not to return till the cover is lifted up in the spring.”

For populations nesting in the Great Lakes region, it is believed that the colonization of the lakes by the non-native alewife (a small prey fish) has provided optimal feeding conditions and hence good breeding success. Double-crested cormorants eat other species of fish besides alewives and have been implicated in the decline of some sport-fish populations in the Great Lakes and other areas. Scientists are not in agreement about the exact extent of the role of cormorants in these declines, but some believe that Double-crested Cormorants may be a factor for some populations and in some locations.

In light of this belief, and because of calls for action by the public, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (the U.S. Federal government agency charged with their protection) has recently extended control options to some other government entities. This includes culling of populations and measures to thwart reproduction, in an effort to control their growing numbers.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service retains oversight and the control measures are not extended to the general public (no hunting season). Many government agencies at different levels in both the U.S. and Canada continue to wrestle with how best to respond to the situation.

In May 2008, the Canadian government reduced significantly the number of nests of the birds on Middle Island, a small island in Lake Erie and part of Point Pelee National Park. This is an attempt to keep the small island in balance and preserve its vegetation but opponents to the plan have pointed out that it is based on faulty information, provided in part by anglers who view cormorants as competitors.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Nyack, interesting information.

2 years ago

Congratulations Brenda Hi Nyack, Noted all the excellent info and sent Messages to the 2 U. S. Senators that represent MI)) Tried to get into the 2 petition links but couldn't Help ! Thanx Barb (Matrix Kitty, One of the many Voices for the Voiceless) ) ) )

2 years ago

Hmmmm... sorry about that Barbara- try this link?

 

Stop Bird Killing Bill

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/702/786/622/stop-bird-killing-bill/

 

 

2 years ago

Congrats Brenda!!!

 

Signed Nyack - new link works.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Val.

Signed Nyack.

2 years ago

Noted and signed Petition STOP BIRD KILLING BILL Thanx Nyack hugggsss

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Barbara.

2 years ago

Well done Brenda. Petition signed. Thanks Nyack

2 years ago

Thank you Nyack, we gladly added our meows to this one. We LIKE seeing the cormorant drying it's wings on the piers down here near our home.  We dont want them killed off due to bad science.    

 

We commented: "Please make a decision based on good science and well rounded research so that you will be called blessed good men of wisdom by future generations. thank you."

 

and BARBARA E.  sometimes, most times, when you find a link that is not "hot" wont underline and let you click it, you can do this....  highlight it all blue with your mouse and then right click your mouse to get a menu that should include, "open link in a new window".  If you do that, it will take you to the petition to sign.  That is what I did here for this one since I did not see the new link that Nyack posted below the first one.  So, just a hint for future reference in case you need it. 

2 years ago

And, also, forgot to say, Nyack, signed BOTH petitions above and very nice that you do this Purposeful and FUN exercise in learning about animals. Very cool way to do this.. GREAT idea you had. 

 

and also, I am going to TRY and post a "hot" link below for the second petition to make it a bit easier to sign it for folks.  If it fails to post as a "hot" link, sorry..  it is showing up hot in my copy, so hope it translates to a hot link here.  but they do not always do that for any of us, do they??    so hoping, hoping..

 


https://secure3.convio.net/bfusa/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=743&JServSessionIdr004=fwu19a0um5.app334a

2 years ago

And, of course it did not post as I had hoped.. oh well..  the TIP I gave Barbara works for it just fine, in case anybody had trouble with it before..  Oh, if only we could all be computer geniuses..... LOL     as for me... NOT!!!  

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Joan.

Hello RC, good to have you with us.

2 years ago

Thanks Brenda, and CONGRATS on your win here!! 

 

  It is nice to be here, I would hve been commenting a lot sooner but  right after I joined your group, a computer/technical glitch at Care2 and Change.org kept me from commenting or signing petitions..  It was "white page hell" for me whenever I tried to comment!!    so just got back on here today!!  YAY. and hopefully, I will be able to comment a lot before the next computer glitch. 

2 years ago

Hi RC this is Barbara E. I am going to try what you did for change.org I haven't been able to post them for about a month now. So happy to have you with us