START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
Group Discussions
label:  
  HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS
| track thread
« Back to topics
HANGMAN GAME # 213
2 years ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I NEVER KNEW WHAT LETTERS TO TAKE OFF ETC. HOPE THAT MAKES SENSE!

2 years ago

We will try both the scientific name, and common name this time- (a little more challanging...)

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

" _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _     _ _ _ _ _ "

 

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

 

 

2 years ago

T please Nyack

2 years ago

Hi, Joan!

 

Letters Guessed

T

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

" T _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _     _ _ _ _ _ "

 

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

R please Nyack.

2 years ago

Hello Brenda- Hope you are having a nice weekend

 

Letters Guessed

T, R

 

 

_ _ R _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    _ _ R R _ _ _ _

 

" T _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _     _ _ _ _ _ "

 

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
2 years ago

Hello Nyack- It would be nice if it would stop raining!!

2 years ago

Hi Everyone Happy Sunday...May I have an A please ) ) )

2 years ago

Thanks Nyack - had plans to come back and start one - and totally forgot - I think I need to go into a cave for a few weeks -   of course the dog and the cat would have to come too!

 

E????

Anonymous
2 years ago

Sarcophilus Harrisii......Tasmanian Devil.

This post was modified from its original form on 03 Jun, 12:43

2 years ago

  CONGRATULATIONS, BRENDA!

2 years ago

 

Stop the Cull of Tasmanian Devils


PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/678/291/237/stop-the-cull-of-tasmanian-devils/

 

The Honorable Julia Gillard MP, Prime Minister Australia

 

Culling does not effectively control the contagious cancer threatening the Tasmanian devil, researchers of a new study suggests. In fact, cases exists where culling wild animals has made the problem worse.

 

But despite the study, presently wild Tasmainain devils are being rounded up and those infected are being culled, those not infected are being put in isolation. Devils from a healthy stock will be used to re-populate the area.

 

Biologists find that 20% of the population is never captured and could be acting as a reservoir for the disease.

 

Researchers have trapped and euthanised sick animals two to five times a year from an isolated population in the south-east of Tasmania in the past. Each year, the project costs more than $200,000 (£122,000) on programs that do not work. Critics say this money could otherwise be spent on captive breeding programmes and vaccine research.

 

First seen in 1996, in some areas 90% of the population has been wiped out by highly unsual cancer, - Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) - which is spread by biting during aggressive mating encounters. The disease forms tumours around the mouth interfering with feeding, leading to death.

 

With 90% of the population gone and the Tasmanian devil so close to extinction, a cull would be a mistake since a cure and/ or a vaccine in a very real possibility.

 

SOURCE:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15158814

 

The Hon Julia Gillard MP

Prime Minister
PO Box 6022
House of Representatives
Parliament House
Canberra ACT 2600

Tel: (02) 6277 7700
Fax: (02) 6273 4100

Email the Prime Minister

2 years ago

 

Tasmanian Devil


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasmanian_devil

 

The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial of the family Dasyuridae, now found in the wild only on the Australian island state of Tasmania. The size of a small dog, it became the largest carnivorous marsupial in the world following the extinction of the thylacine in 1936. It is characterised by its stocky and muscular build, black fur, pungent odour, extremely loud and disturbing screech, keen sense of smell, and ferocity when feeding. The Tasmanian devil's large head and neck allow it to generate the strongest bite per unit body mass of any living mammal, and it hunts prey and scavenges carrion as well as eating household products if humans are living nearby. Although it is usually solitary, it sometimes eats with other devils and defecates in a communal location. Unlike most other dasyurids, the devil thermoregulates effectively and is active during the middle of the day without overheating. Despite its rotund appearance, the devil is capable of surprising speed and endurance, and can climb trees and swim across rivers.

It is believed that ancient marsupials migrated from what is now South America to Australia tens of millions of years ago during the time of Gondwana, and that they evolved as Australia became more arid. Fossils of species similar to modern devils have been found, but it is not known whether they were ancestors of the contemporary species, or whether the current devils co-existed with these species. The date that the Tasmanian devil disappeared from the Australian mainland is unclear; most evidence suggests they had contracted to three relict populations around 3000 years ago. A tooth found in Augusta, Western Australia has been dated to 430 years ago, but archaeologist Oliver Brown disputes this and considers the devil's mainland extinction to have occurred around 3000 years ago. This disappearance is usually blamed on dingoes, which are absent from Tasmania. Because they were seen as a threat to livestock and animals that humans hunted for fur in Tasmania, devils were hunted and became endangered. In 1941, the devils, which were originally seen as implacably vicious, became officially protected. Since then, scientists have contended that earlier concerns that the devils were the most significant threat to livestock were overestimated and misplaced.

 

2 years ago

Devils are not monogamous, and their reproductive process is very robust and competitive. Males fight one another for the females, and then guard their partners to prevent female infidelity. Females can ovulate three times in as many weeks during the mating season, and 80% of two-year-old females are seen to be pregnant during the annual mating season. Females average four breeding seasons in their life and give birth to 20–30 live young after three weeks' gestation. The newborn are pink, lack fur, have indistinct facial features and weigh around 0.20 g (0.0071 oz) at birth. As there are only four nipples in the pouch, competition is fierce and few newborns survive. The young grow rapidly and are ejected from the pouch after around 100 days, weighing roughly 200 g (7.1 oz). The young become independent after around nine months, so the female spends most of her year in activities related to childbirth and rearing.

Since the late 1990s, devil facial tumour disease has drastically reduced the devil population and now threatens the survival of the species, which in 2008 was declared to be endangered. Programs are currently being undertaken by the Government of Tasmania to reduce the impact of the disease, including an initiative to build up a group of healthy devils in captivity, isolated from the disease. While the thylacine was extant it preyed on the devil, which targeted young and unattended thylacine cubs in their dens. Nowadays, the devil is also preyed upon by the illegally introduced red fox, and localised populations of devils have also been severely reduced by collisions with motor vehicles, particularly when they are eating roadkill themselves.

The devil is an iconic symbol of Tasmania and many organisations, groups and products associated with the state use the animal in their logos. It is seen as an important attractor of tourists to Tasmania and has come to worldwide attention through the Looney Tunes character of the same name. Due to export restrictions and the failure of overseas devils to breed, there are almost no devils outside Australia except for any that have been illegally smuggled.

2 years ago

CONSERVATION STATUS

Widespread across Australia in the Pleistocene, the Tasmanian devil had declined and become restricted to three relict populations during the mid-Holocene period around 3,000 years ago. Rock art and a single fossil near Darwin point to a northern population, and remains in the southeast signify a southeastern population ranging from the mouth of the Murray River eastwards to the vicinity of Port Phillip in Victoria. This population had contracted from northern Victoria and New South Wales. The rising sea levels in the Holocene also cut it off from Tasmanian populations. The third population was from southwest Western Australia. Fossil evidence from this last location has proven controversial. As with many native animals, ancient devils were larger than their contemporary descendants. In 1972, Mike Archer and Alex Baynes found a devil tooth at the foot of a cliff near Augusta in Western Australia and dated it to 430±160 years of age, a figure widely circulated and cited. Australian archaeologist Oliver Brown has disputed this, stating that the authors' uncertainty about the origins of the tooth casts doubts on its age, especially as other remains all date to around 3,000 years ago.

The cause of their disappearance from the mainland is unclear, but their decline seems to coincide with the expansion across the mainland of indigenous Australians and dingoes. However, whether it was direct hunting by people, competition with dingoes, changes brought about by the increasing human population, who by 3000 years ago were using all habitat types across the continent, or a combination of all three, is unknown; devils had coexisted with dingoes on the mainland for around 3000 years. Brown has also proposed that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) grew stronger during the Holocene, and that the devil, as a scavenger with a short life span, was highly sensitive to this. In dingo-free Tasmania, carnivorous marsupials were still active when Europeans arrived. The extermination of the thylacine after the arrival of the Europeans is well known, but the Tasmanian devil was threatened as well.

Thylacines preyed on devils, and devils attacked thylacine young; devils may have hastened the thylacine's extinction. While the thylacine was extant, apart from hunting devils, it may also have put pressure on the devil for survival, by competing for scarce food and dens; both animals sought caves and burrows. It has been speculated that devils may have become more predacious and presided over larger home ranges to fill in the vacancy left by the thylacine.

Habitat disruption can expose dens where mothers raise their young. This increases mortality, as the mother leaves the disturbed den with her pups clinging to her back, making them more vulnerable.

 

2 years ago

Cancer in general is a common cause of death in devils. In 2008, high levels of potentially carcinogenic flame retardant chemicals were found in Tasmanian devils. Preliminary results of tests ordered by the Tasmanian government on chemicals found in fat tissue from 16 devils have revealed high levels of hexabromobiphenyl (BB153) and "reasonably high" levels of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209).

Since 1999, all devils caught in the field have had ear biopsies taken, providing samples of DNA. As of September 2010, there are 5,642 samples in this collection.

 

POPULATION DECLINES

At least two major population declines, possibly due to disease epidemics, have occurred in recorded history: in 1909 and 1950. The devil was also reported as scarce in the 1850s. It is difficult to estimate the size of the devil population. In the mid-1990s, the population was estimated at 130,000–150,000 animals, but this is likely to have been an overestimate.The Tasmanian devil's population has been calculated in 2008 by Tasmania's Department of Primary Industries and Water as being in the range of 10,000 to 100,000 individuals, with 20,000 to 50,000 mature individuals being likely. Experts estimate that the devil has suffered a more than 80% decline in its population since the mid-1990s and that only around 10,000–15,000 remain in the wild as of 2008.

The species was listed as vulnerable under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 in 2005 and the Australian Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 in 2006, which means that it is at risk of extinction in the "medium term". The IUCN classified the Tasmanian devil in the lower risk/least concern category in 1996, but in 2009 they reclassified it as endangered.

2 years ago

FURTHER READING

 

  • Tasmanian Devil Babies - Care2 News Network
  • Mar 22, 2011 ... As comical as it is, the familiar Looney Tunes portrayal of a Tasmanian devil as a seething, snarling, insatiable lunatic is, at times, not all that far ...
2 years ago

Well done Brenda. Petition signed. Thanks Nyack

2 years ago

Wow! I was away yesterday and I come back to find that a whole game has come and gone without me. lol Congratulations, Brenda. Great job!!

Nyack, I signed the petition. Thanks for all the information about the cute little devil.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Nyack,Joan and Lynn
Signed petition.

2 years ago

Signed - congrats Brenda!

2 years ago

Congratulations Brenda Could hardly pronounce the whole name...Tasmanian Devil now I know how to pronounce that LOL Super Job !!! Noted all the info. and signed the petition Thanx Nyack...Have a Great Week Everyone ) ) )

Anonymous
2 years ago

Thanks Val and Barbara.